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JOSEPH R. MILES 

LLOYDS FILM STORAGE CORPORATION 
130 WEST 46th STREET 



Telephone 
BRYANT 5600-1 



NEW YORK CITY 



Telephone 
BRYANT 9740-1 



Scanned from the collection of 
Karl Thiede 



Coordinated by the 
Media History Digital Library 
www.mediahistoryproject.org 



Funded by a donation from 
Richard Scheckman 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/widsyearbook192000wids 



WID'S YEAR BOOK 



1920-1921 



Replete with .statistical data and other information 
of interest to all identified with the production, 
distribution or exhibition of motion pictures, in- 
cluding a complete record of all feature produc- 
tions of the year, recorded separately as well, under 
lists of productions, directors, stars and camera- 
men. This information should prove invaluable. 



WID'S FILMS AND FILM FOLKS, INC 



71 WEST FORTY-FOURTH STREET - - NEW YORK, N. Y. 
6411 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD - - HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 




// is suggested that this Year Book 
be retained for reference purposes 



F. C. (VVID) GUNNING 
JOSEPH DAN N EN BERG 
JOHN W. ALICOATE - 



- - President and Treasurer 
Vice-President and Editor 
Secretary and Business Manager 



FOR INDEX SEE PAGE 64 A 



All (ienuine Griffith Productions have the initials "D. G." 
and the written name "Griffith" stamped in the film. Any 
production advertised as by or supervised by D. W. Griffith, 
and not having this Trademark, is fraudulent. 




. Authentic Griffith Productions Since 1915 

I HE BIRTH OF A NATION" "THE GREAT LOVE" 

INTOLERANCE" "THE GREATEST THING IN LIFE" 

HEARTS OF THE WORLD" "A ROMANCE OF HAPPY VALLEY" 

BROKEN BLOSSOMS" "THE GIRL WHO STAYED AT 
THE MOTHER AND THE LAW" HOME" 

THE FALL OF BABYLON" TRUE HEART SUZIE" 

THE GREATEST QUESTION" "SCARLET DAYS" 

THE IDOL DANCER" "THE LOVE FLOWER" 

"WAY DOWN EAST" 



For Information Concerning Griffith Productions, Address 

ALBERT L. GREY, General Manager 
Suite 303 Longacre Building, 1480 Broadway, New York City 



I -A 



ONLY AN ORGANIZATION that has back of it the 
resources — in artists, in ideals and in equipment 
— that the Famous Players-Lasky Corporation has, can 
offer to exhibitors such a list of assured box-office suc- 
cesses as are now ready for release. 

The productions herein listed are typical of what the 
rest of the year will bring. They are all completed, and 
can be seen at the exchanges. 



\i FAMOUS PLAYERS - LASKY CORPORATION El W> 



SEPTEMBER 



GEORGE FITZMAURICE production "The Right to 



4*- Love." Alavish and beautiful production, with more human 
passion and more spectacular thrills than "On With the Dance." 

CHARLES RAY in "A Village Sleuth," a Thomas H. Ince pro- 
duction. Here's Charlie again in a funny hick role — full of laughs, 
with the pathos of real life underneath. 

ELSIE FERGUSON in "Lady Rose's Daughter." Never before 
has Miss Ferguson appeared to such advantage as in this, her 
biggest picture, dramatically and scenically. 

WALLACE REID in "What's Your Hurry?" Here are thrills 
and more than thrills; comedy and more than comedy. A thun- 
dering drama that is as vital as the elements. 

"HUMORESQUE," featuring Alma Rubens; a Cosmopolitan 
production. Its Broadway record tells the story. At high prices 
it packed houses during the hot summer months. The biggest 
picture of the year. 

DOROTHY DALTON in Sir James Barrie's famous play "Half 
an Hour." The author of "Male and Female" and "Peter Pan" 
has written here a tremendous emotional drama which makes 
a marvelous production. 

A HUGH FORD production- — Thomas Meighan in "Civilian 
Clothes." She saw him in uniform — and married him! Then 
when he came back in his civilian clothes she saw — horrors! — 
that he was a roughneck ! His strange winning of his wife makes 
an absorbing story. 

DOROTHY GISH in "Little Miss Rebellion." A princess who 
hates her job — and a revolution! And the princess landed in 
a restaurant — making flapjacks! See what happens then. Some- 
thing different for Miss Gish, something wholly delightful. 




OCTOBER 

CECIL B. De MILLE'S production "Something to Think 
About." Into simple humanities De Mille has gone in this 
production, and with his magic touch he invests them with 
compelling vitality. 

DOUGLAS Mac LEAN in "The Jailbird," a Thomas H. Ince 
production. The story of a bird who broke out of jail and 
started a lot of things, then broke back in to finish them. You 
know it'll be funny. 

ROSCOE (FATTY) ARBUCKLE in "The Round Up," a 
George Melford production. Fatty's first full-length drama! 
And made from the great melodramatic stage success! Will 
the people .eat it up? They will! 

MAURICE TOURNEUR'S production "Deep Waters." An 
idyll of New England's coast that tells a story of a love that 
could not be drowned even in the deep waters of jealousy. 

WILLIAM S. HART in "The Cradle of Courage." Hart is a 
crook who turns cop and fights a mighty fight to be square. 
Action and thrills to the limit. 

ETHEL CLAYTON in "A City Sparrow." A heart interest 
story that will move the most calloused to tears and the 
gloomiest to laughter. 

WILLIAM GILLETTE'S "Held by the Enemy." The biggest of 
all stage startlers, acted by an all-star cast and produced on a 
gigantic scale. A punch in every scene. 

BRYANT WASHBURN in "A Full House." A riproarious 
game of love that wasn't played exactly according to Hoyle. A 
royal flush of laughter that'll win a hand every time. 

COSMOPOLITAN production "The Restless Sex," with 
Marion Davies. Robert W. Chambers' great novel translated 
to the screen with all its passion and romance. 

CHARLES RAY in "An Old-Fashioned Boy," a Thomas H.Ince 
production. When a chap with 1840 ideas gets wise to himself 
and catches up with the calendar — watch him speed! It's a 
typical Ray comedy drama. 



NOVEMBER 



GEORGE MELFORD'S production "Behold My Wife," Sir 
Gilbert Parker's famous story of the meeting of two poles 
of society, staged against backgrounds of marvelous color and 
acted by an all-star cast. 

ETHEL CLAYTON in "Sinsof Rosanne." Sheloved onlyjewels, 
and her heart was as hard as her diamonds until a man found 
a way to awaken her. Wierd, thrilling and mystifying. 

WALLACE REID in "Always Audacious" (Toujours de l'Au- 
dace). A crook who looks like a millionaire and cops .his 
sweetheart, his home and his millions — until the beans are 
spilled. Five reels of laughter and excitement. 

ENID BENNETT in "Her Husband's Friend." A Thomas H. 
Ince production. These domestic dramas in which Enid Bennett 
has been appearing have made new friends for the star and 
patrons for the exhibitor. This is another one with a different 
angle, thoroughly captivating. 

BILLIE BURKE in "The Frisky Mrs. Johnson," Clyde Fitch's 
famous play of a woman who sacrificed even her reputation to 
save her friend. Billie Burke's best role. 

BRYANT WASHBURN in "Burglar Proof." He was so stingy 
you couldn't get a nickel out of him with dynamite. But a girl 
found the combination to his heart as well as to his pocketbook. 

A GEORGE FITZMAURICE production "Idols of Clay." In 
the South Seas, in London's Bohemia and in the palaces of the 
rich, she searched — for love. And the story of her search is 
stupendous in drama, opulent and spectacular in production. 

DOROTHY DALTON in "A Romantic Adventuress." 
Against her will an adventuress — a blackmailer! Forced to trick 
the man she really loved ! How does she save herself from her fate ? 




Qhe W/io and Why 
of Associated Producers 



Associated Producers are seven men of definite, achieved 
reputations and accomplishments in motion picture pro- 
duction. 

These seven men decided after long years of paying toll 
and tribute to distributors to cut beyond those distributors 
who used them to bolster up weak directors and trivial 
stars. 

They own their personal organization for the production, 
release and sale of their pictures directly to the exhibitors 
of the country. The advantages of this organization will 
be available to other producer-directors whose pictures de- 
serve to be taken into this selective organization. 

As a new organization, Associated Producers, Inc., will be 
assailed by many unfair and some malicious rumors that 
can be traced back to competing companies. Exhibitors 
may put 100% faith in our announcements to the trade. 
Our pictures will build their own confidence. Our organ- 
ization is liberally and properly financed and we own every 
dollar of it ourselves. It will endure and grow. 



THOMAS H. INCE -:• MACK SENNETT * MARSHALL NEILAN 
ALLAN DWAN * GEORGE LOANE TUCKER 
MAURICE TOURNEUR * J. PARKER READ JR. 

Associated Producers Inc. 

HOME OFFICES: 729 SEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK CITY 



1 




GEORGE LOANE TUCKER 

OFFERS 

"LADIES MUST LIVE" 



2 



MARSHALL NEILAN 

'PRODUCER OF 

"THE RIVERS END" "DONT EVER MARRY" 
"GO AND GET IT" "DINTY" 

RELEASING THROUGH FIRST NATIONAL 



MACK SENNETT 



Announces 

A new high standard for 5 reel 
comedies and comedy dramas. 
These Box Office Successes of 
the past are a guarantee of even 
greater attractions in the future: 

"TILLIE'S PUNCTURED ROMANCE" 

"MICKEY" 
"YANKEE DOODLE IN BERLIN" 
"DOWN ON THE FARM" 
"MARRIED LIFE" 



4 









^^^^ 






THOMAS H. INCE 


Associated Producers Inc. 




ALLAN DWAN 



Invites the Attention of Exhibitors to 
Coming Allan Dwan Productions : 

"THE SCOFFER" "HEART OF A FOOL" 
"THE SIN OF MARTHA QUEED" 

Mayflower — First National Release 

"THE FORBIDDEN THING" 

Associated Producers Release 



For pre-view, write 

BERT ADLER, Personal Representative 
140 West 42nd Street, New York City 



6 



e mher 
^ssocia.tedL^Todjv.ceTS Inc. 



J. barker 9^ ad Jr 

Produdlions 




C \. LOUISE GLAUM 
( ^ HOBAPvT BOSWOKTH 




• cMa.de a£ ike 
THOMAS H.INCE STUDIOS 
Q-ulOer- Ciij , C oulij^o r"*ii 



8 




LOIS WEB E R 
PRODUCTIONS 

"To Please One Woman" 
"What Do Men Want" 

Distributed by Famous Players- Lasky Corp. 



11 




12 




13 




E. K. LINCOLN 



is 




16 




Production/'/ 
M.P.D.A. 

„ Producing /»■ GolAvtyn „ 



0 

T>ro4*t<rtion.r Phofo^t'ApUeA by 

Pei'cy H i 1 b u f n_ 



17 



EVA NOVAK 

LA TE RELEASES 

"THE TESTING BLOCK" and "O MALLEY OF THE MOUNTED" 

with Win. S. Hart 

Miss Novak has just signed a long term contract to star in a series of Universal Specials. 



18 




19 



DIDECTOD y AILTHOQ 

Since 1916 Director of 25 Successful 
Productions .dutfior of 60 Successful Stones 



1916- 17 

1917- 19 
1919—20 



iDrote and Directed fox 
I nee - Uxian^e . 

Directed all of th~e 16 
ffart-Jrtcrqft Productions. 

Directing iPm S Hart's 
Super-Special drtcrqft Productions 

Directed and iJrote, ufie Doll Gate, 
Sand, Cradle qf Couna3s,3fie testing 
Block, O'Malle) of Me Mounted, etc. 



20 




PDODUCTION ED I TOD 

Editor of o-Oer J00 Productions inc/udm^ 
oJi ffaj-t -HiDjerdrtcraft Produ ctions. 



1915 — 1916 

1916— 1917 

1917 — 1919 
1919 — 1920 



Editor VfiomqsHlnce Productions 
including 'Civilization" 

Auditor Ince-JnariQe •Productions. 

Editor Ince Paramourrt-Jricraft 
Productions mcJudinPdgmJSert 
HiHjers Hart Pro auctions. 

EditorTDilham SHart Product ions 
Cam£ert HiUjer Director 



21 



BETTY BLYTHE 

LATE RELEASES 

Lew Cody in "OCCASIONALLY YOURS" 
James Oliver Curwood's "NOMADS of the NORTH" 



22 




PAUL SCARDON, M P. D A. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS 

(Assisted by TENNY WRIGHT) 

For Goldwyn— "MILESTONES" 
"PARTNERS OF THE NIGHT" 
"HER UNWILLING HUSBAND" 

with Blanche Sweet 

"THE BROKEN GATE" 

with Bessie Barriscale 

ADDRESS— HOLLYWOOD HOTEL, HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 
OR GREEN ROOM CLUB, NEW YORK CITY 



23 




EVELYN GREELEY 



24 





TOM TERRISS 



DIRECTOR Of— "THE LION AND THE MOUSE" "THE THIRD DEGREE" 
•THE CLIMBERS" "THE FORTUNE HUNTER" 

And Latest 

SPECIAL TOM TERRISS PRODUCTIONS 

'TRUMPET ISLAND" "DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES'' 

By Gouverneur Morris By E. W. Hornung— ( Raffles) 



25 




MARGUERITE CLAYTON 



26 



WALLACE 
MAC DONALD 



r 

"TRUMPET ISLAND" 

r 

"MOON MADNESS" 

r 

"CINDERELLA'S TWIN" 

r 



"ARE ALL MEN 
ALIKE" 




VICTOR SCHERTZINGER 

Supervising and Directing 

MABEL NORMAND PRODUCTIONS 

FOR GOLDWYN 



29 




Rosson 



Director 



DISTRIBUTED 
BY GOLDWYN 



Second 
production now 
tn tbe nvaton^ 



30 



BETTY COM PS ON 

Personally Producing Her Own Starring Productions at the 
Brunton Studios, Los Angeles 

First Release 

"PRISONERS OF LOVE" 

Distributed by Goldwyn 



31 




^^SfeMAN BEAIND- 

THE GREATEST NUMBER 

O/* COMSISTE NT 
COMEDY SUCCESSES 




32 



THOFLS 



foremost dramatists 
novelists and short 
story writers of the 
woiid will contribute 
the stories for these 
superb features. 

Every name is 
a guarantee of un- 
matched excellence 
and permits the ut- 
most in advertis- 
ing and publicity: 



ZAn.thonu3H.ope 



&u.jem~W&ltev 



fhsnids Jia>\iy U^Ji Justus JiUes E^--i.i>^ 





[2 Scott Jilzierald 




NAZIMOVA 

PRODUCTIONS/ first hoc of which will be 

MILLIONS * 

dH ^iptacisn bu CHARLES BRYANI from thi celebrated ~Jre*xcW 
pUi, jf TEAN JOSE FRAPPA And HENRY DUPUYAiAZUEL 

cad MADAME PEACOCK 

■ ■ bit RITA WEIMAN i 

METRO 




GEO 



D. BAKER 



Some Past 
Releases 



"TARANTULA" 

"THE WAGER" 

"THE WHITE 
RAVEN" 

"THE SHELL 
GAME" 

•REVELATION" 

• PEGGY DOES 
HER , 
DARNDEST" 

"CASTLES 
IN THE AIR" 

"THE MAN 
WHO LOST 
HIMSELF" 

"A WHIFF OF 
HELIOTROPE" 

"BURIED 
TREASURE" 



In Preparation 

"PROXIES" 




130 W. 44th St., New York 



33 




35 



Productions 




3IN ANSWER , 
TO THE PUBLIC S 
DEMAND FOR 
BETTER 
PICTURES 



STU 

7200 SANTA MONICA BLVD. 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
6 WEST 48- STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



36 



CLAIRE WINDSOR 

Lois W eber Productions 



37 




JACK NELSON 

Director 



BERT CANN 

Photogr, ipher 



THOMAS H. INCE STUDIOS 



38 





DORIS MAY 

THOS. H, INCE STUDIOS 

CO-STAR IN: 

;'23/ 2 Hours' Leave" COMING RELEASES: 

"What's Your Husband Doing?" "The Tailbird" 

"Mary's Ankle" (< _, „ 

"Let's Be Fashionable" The Rooki e's Return" 



39 



m 4©~a month, and pjrime* ! 





40 



ANITA STEWART 

Anita Stewart Productions, Inc. First National Attractions 



41 



JULIA BRUNS 

Co-Star with Arnold Daly 

in 

"WHEN WE LOVE" 



42 



JULIA BKUNS 

Co -Star with Arnold Daly in 

"WHEN WE LOVE 



43 



JOHN GILBERT, Directing 

HOPE HAMPTON 
at 

PARAGON STUDIOS, FORT LEE, New Jkrsey 



44 




45 



MAHLON HAMILTON 

LEADS 
Recent Releases 
"DADDY LONG LEGS" "IN OLD KENTUCKY" 

Early Fall Releases 
George Loane Tucker's "LADIES MUST LIVE" 
Hampton Special "HALF A CHANCE" 
Goldwyn's "EARTHBOUND" 



46 



1 i — 

JUSTINE JOHNSTON E— Realart 



47 



ROBERT G. VIGNOLA 
PRODUCTIONS 




MADE FOR 

COSMOPOLITAN 



RELEASED BYJ 

PARAMOUNT 




PHIL CARLE 
Asst. Director 



The Director 



AL. LIGUORI 
Cinematographer 

CURRENT KELEASE: 

"THE WORLD AND HIS WIFE" 

By CHARLES FREDERIC NIRDLINGEK 
Scenario by FRANCES MAPJON 

COMING : 

"THE PASSIONATE PILGRIM" 

By SAMUEL MERWIN 

Scenario by DONNAH DARRELL 

IN PrVEPAKATION . 

"THE MANIFESTATION OF HENRY ORT" 

(WORKING TITLE) 

By ETHEL WATTS MUMFOKD 
Scenario by FRANCES MARION 



49 



GEORGE MELFORD 

Director 



Recent Releases: 
"EVERY WOMAN" 
"SEA WOLF" 

Early Fall Releases: 
"THE ROUNDUP" 

"BEHOLD MY 
WIFE" 

"FAITH HEALER" 

By William Vaughn Moody 

Now in Preparation: 
"JUCKLINS" 

By Opie Read 




Now producing a series of George Melford 
Productions for Famous Players Lasky 



51 



DOROTHY PHILLIPS 

■ 

IN AN 

Allen Holubar Production 

MAN— WOMAN— MARRIAGE 

A FIRST NATIONAL ATTRACTION 



52 



ALLEN HOLUBAR 

announces his first independent super-pro- 
duction since 

"THE HEART OF HUMANITY" 

MAN— WOMAN— MARRIAGE 

A First National Attraction 
Starring MISS DOROTHY PHILLIPS 



53 




DUSTIN FARNUM 

Making his own productions to be released through 

ROBERTSON - COLE 

Initial Release 
"BIG HAPPINESS" by Pan 
"THE TRAIL OF THE AXE" by Ridgewell Cullum 

Now in Production 



55 



CHARLES SWICKARD, Director 

RECENT RELEASES 

"LI TING LANG" and "AN ARABIAN KNIGHT" 

Now back with Metro directing 
"BODY AND SOUL" with Alice Lake 



56 




57 



WILLIAMSON 
SUBMARINE PICTURES 




( r nder the title of— 

"Submarine Photography— A New Art" 

The Scientific American gave its front page and 
leading article on this original accomplishment 
by J. E. Williamson 

What followed : 

THE WILLIAMSON SUBMARINE EXPEDITION 

TWENTY THOUSAND LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA 
THE SUBMARINE EYE 

THE WHITE HEATHER 

GIRL OF THE SEA 

Watch for the next 

Williamson Submarine Picture 

Directed by 

RALPH INCE 



59 



W. W. HODKINSON 

President of the W. W. Hodkinson Corporation 

Mr. Hodkinson is one of the real pioneers of the motion picture industry . 
having entered the business in 1907. He has foreseen or taken part in 
launching every movement of consequence for the benefit of the exhibitor 
and of the public that has been made in the motion picture business in the 
past thirteen years. 

In 1914 he organized the Paramount Company and was president of 
this organization until 1917, at which time he organized the W. W. Hodkin- 
son Corporation in order that he might be enabled to carry out with a free 
hand the many ideas which his keen, clear brain saw as of great necessity 
I ( i I he industry. 

Mr. Hodkinson has been foremost always in bringing to the screen the 
works of the leading literary lights of the day and has stood always for uplift 
and progress in the Motion Picture industry. 



60 



VIRGINIA VALLI 

Bretton Hall Hotel 

NEW YORK 



01' 



GOLDWYN 
PICTURES 



Sixty pictures will be released by the 
Goldwyn Pictures Corporation during 
the 1920-1921 season. 

No effort or expense has been spared to 
put into these sixty pictures the finest 
elements of the film industry. 

From its inception, each picture is con- 
stantly under the supervision of men and 
women skilled in meeting the public 
taste. 



62 




The foremost authors of the world have 
co-operated in the production of a list of 
features marking a vast ste p forward jin 
screen effort. 

Aided by the best dramatic talent, their 
film work has been given the same per- 
sonal vita lity and_T emotional quality as 
their most not ed^ novels. 

Each picture produced is subjected to 
the severest fcritical examination, from 
every angle, ' as to its ^amusement and 
profit-getting qualities before it is offered 
for release. 



GOLDWYN 
PICTURES 




63 



For Distinctiv 


e Pictures 


Inquire at any of these 


Associated First National Exchanges 


Atlanta, Ga. . 




Boston, Mass. 




Buffalo, N. Y. 




Chicago, 111 




Cincinnati, 0. 


Broadway and Pioneer Sts. 


Cleveland, 0. . . ; 




Denver, Colo. 




Des Moines, la. . 


. . . . 326 Iowa Bldg. 


Detroit, Mich 




Indianapolis, Ind 


24 West Washington St. 


Kansas City, Mo 




Kansas City, Mo 


. . Twelfth St. Theatre 


Los Angeles, Calif 


. . . 732 So. Olive St. 


Louisville, Ky 




Milwaukee, Wis. .... 


. . . . 402 Toy Bldg. 


Minneapolis, Minn 


408 Loeb Arcade Bldg. 


New York, N. Y. ... 


. . . 729 Seventh Ave. 


New Orleans, La 


. . . 1401 Tulane Ave. 


Omaha, Neb 


. . . 314 So. 13th St. 


New Haven Conn 


128 Meadow St. 


Philadelphia, Pa 


. . . . 1339 Vine St. 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


. . . . 119 Ninth St. 


Richmond, Va. 


904 East Broad St. 


St. Louis, Mo 


. . 617 No. Grand Ave. 






Seattle, Wash 


. . . 2023 Third Ave. 


Salt Lake City, Utah 


. . 60 Exchange Place 




. . . 91-93 East Queen St. 


Montreal, Can 


. Film Exchange Bldg. 


Vancouver, B. C 


1318 Standard Bank Bldg. 


Washington, D. C 


. . . . 916 G St., N.W. 


FIRST NATIONAL EXCHANGES 




Old Mill Bldg. 


Little Rock, Ark 


. . . . 106 So. Cross St. 




127 So. Hudson St. 


tjhortfll be a Franchise everywhere 



64 



General Index 



Resume and Outlook 64D 

The Year in Headlines 65 

List of Educational Institutions Equipped 

with Projection Machines 105 

Leading Distributors' Exchange Addresses... 139 
Independent Exchanges and Product Handled 147 

Important Industrial Films 167 

National Motion Picture League — Purposes 

and Officials 177 

The Short Reel Outlook 179 

Photographs 180 

Membership American Society of Cinemeto- 

graphers 187 

Membership Theater Owners Asso. of Cali- 
fornia 189 

Membership Independent Exhibitors Corp. of 

Washington 189 

Seating Capacity Broadway Picture Houses 189 

M. P. T. O. of America 191 

Theater Chains 193 

M. P. D. A. Membership 211 

Assistant Directors Association Membership 213 

Legal Holidays in U. S 213 

Publishers of Tax Free Music 215 

M. P. Art Directors. Association 215 

What of the Coming Year? (Ideas of Pro- 
ducers, Distributors and Others as to What 

1920-21 Has in Store) 217 

Towns Booked from Exchange Centers 225 

Most Important Event of the Year (Comment 

of Important Film Folk) 227 

What of Prohibition? (Impressions on a Most 

Important Topic) 233 

The Foreign Market 239 

English Exchanges 241 

English Producers 241 

Film Exports for Year Ending June 30, 1920 241 

British Studios 243 

London Film Importers 243 

London Film Exporters 245 

French Customs Tariff 245 

French Censorship 245 

French Renters (Exchanges) and Dealers .... 247 

French Producers 247 

French Syndicates 247 

French Film Publications 247 

French Productions 247 

Spanish Producers 249 

Italian Producers 249 

Buyers in India 251 

Dutch Producers 251 

Belgian Renters 251 

Belgian Manufacturers 251 

Belgian Importers 251 

Australia 251 

Important English Theater Circuits 251 

Import and Export Statistics 253 

Percentage Tables of Distribution (American 

and Foreign) 255 

Opinions on Foreign Outlook 257 

Paramount's Foreign Offices 265 

Bureau of Commerce Reports: 

Germany 265 

Argentine 269 

Peru 269 

Japan 269 

Switzerland 269 

Belgium 269 

China 271 

Turkey (Constantinople) ." 271 



64a 



Egypt (Cairo) 271 

United Kingdom (With Import Table) 271 

Italy 271 

Burma 275 

Bulgaria . .275 and 491 

Mediterranean Conditions — Report from Brit- 
ish Department of Over-seas Trade, London 275 

Far East 275 

Important Incorporations of the Year 277 

Outlook Regarding Serials 285 

American Films in Czecho Slovakia 285 

Industrial-Carter Cinema Co. Releases 288a 

Bibliography — Books and Articles Regarding 

the Industry 288b 

Regarding Pictures in General 288b 

Regarding History and Early Experiments ... 288b 

Regarding Laws and Regulations 288b 

Regarding Plays 289 

Regarding Morals and Censorship 289 

Regarding Acting 291 

Regarding Photography 291 

Regarding Projection 291 

Regarding Music 291 

Regarding Art 293 

Advertising and Salesmanship 299 

Regarding Education 293 

Regarding Biographies 293 

N. A. M. P. 1 293 

Important First Run Houses 295 and 481 

Federal Laws and Regulations 305 

Copyright 305 

Loan, Rental, or Sale of Films 305 

Immoral Films 305 

Prize Fight Films 305 

Films sent by Mail 305 

Protection of the Uniform — Army and Navy 307 
Regulations Regarding Shipment of Films . . . 307 

Tariff Schedule 307 

Taxes on Films 307 

Excise Taxes 307 

Internal Revenue Taxes 309 

Lesees Tax Obligation 309 

Proposed Federal Legislation — Censorship . . 309 

Other Proposed Legislation 309 

State Laws 309 

Ordinances of Principal Cities of This Country 313 

Canadian Ordinances 327 

Age Limit of Minors in Theaters 327 

Important Legal Decisions 329 

Censorship — Conditions by States 333 

Japanese Censorship 335 

Film Exchange Associations with Officers and 

Addresses 335 

Federal Tax and Gross Business 335 

Productions of the Year, Including Title, 
Name of Releasing Company, Date of Re- 
lease, Star, Director and Date of Review . . 337 
Productions of the Year by Company Release. . 369 

State Rights Releases 375 

Directors and Their Productions 377 

National Board of Review Selections 383 

Americanization Idea in Films 383 

Womens' Clubs 383 

St. Louis Theater Capacities 383 

Stars and Their Productions 385 

Work of Cameramen 391 

Studios, East and West 397 

Laboratories, East and West 399 

Raw Stock 399 

First Film Made in U. S 399 

Companies Making Industrial Pictures 399 

Parcel Post Rates 489 

Membership Theater Owners Chamber of Com- 
merce of Greater New York 491 

A. M. P. A. Officials and Membership 491 

Australian Theaters and Number of Playing 

Days 491 

Too Late to Classify 493 

Farley Decision 

Additional Independent Exchanges and Pro- 
ductions Handled 

Additional Theater Chains 

Additional Comment on Outlook 
Industrial and Advertising Film Producers . . . 493 
Best Sellers of Year 495 



Index to Advertisers 



A 

Adams, Claire 407 

Adolfi, John G 334 

Alder, Win,' F 236 

Allen. Paul H 270 

Aller's Laboratory 525 

Allison, May 166 

American Cinema Corp. . . . 386 
American Society of Cinema- 

tographers 497 

Andrews, Del 440 

George Archainbaud ..... 419 

Arnold, John 500 

Associated Producers, Inc . 1 

Aywon Film Co. 521 

B 

Badger, Clarence G 484 

Bailey, Wm, N 432 

Baker. C. Graham 444 

Baker, George D 33 

Ballin, Hugo Prod.. Inc. ... 273 

Ballin, Mabel 272 

Barker, Reginald 16 & 17 

Barlatier, Andre 512 

Barnes Printing Co 494 

Barrows. James 0 482 

Barry, Wesley 400 

Bayne, Beverly 122 

Beal, Frank 156 

Beaumont, Harry 90 

Beban, George 240 

Behannesey 522 

Bennett, Enid 100 

Bennett. Chester 390 

Bennett, Whitman Studios . 194 

Benoit, Georges 505 

Beranger, Clara 108 

Beranger, George A . .286 & 287 

Bertram, Wm 274 

Berwilla Film Co 168 

Biograph Studios 527 

Bitzer, Billy 266 

Eilzer, J. C . . 510 

Bitzer, Louis C 270 

Bizeul, Jacques 514 

Black, Wm. J 512 

Blackton, J. Stuart Prod. 

Inside Back Cover 
Bloom Film Laboratories . 372 

Blythe, Betty 22 

Borden, Eugene 473 

Borzage, Frank 218 

Boyd Wm 484 

Breamer, Sylvia 276 

Bret, Tom 465 

Broadwell Prod., Inc 324 

Browne. Lewis Allen .... 455 

Browning, Tod 441 

Bruns, Julia 42 & 43 

Brunton, Robert (Studios) 

402 & 403 
Brunton, Robert (Produc- 
tions) 404 

Burston Films ; . . 352 

Bushman, Francis X 122 

Butler, David 210 

Burns, .Harry 426 

c 

Cabanne, W. Christy 382 

Cadwell, A. A 499 

Cameron, Donald .......... 445 

Campbell, W. S. 427 

Campbell, W. S. (Staff) . . 426 

Cairn, Bert 498 

Carry. Harry 164 

Carlcton, Lloyd 358 

Carlctoh, Wm. P 256 

Carr?. Ben 478 

Carrigan. Thos 326 

Cayuga Pictures, Inc 496 

Cazcneuve, Paul 448 

Chadwick, Helene 436 

Champury. Francis E 477 

Chaplin, Mildred Harris ... 435 



Chase, Colin 326 

Chaston. Fred 505 

Chautard, Emile 35 

Christie, Al 32 

Clark-Cornelius 290 

Clark, Harvey 467 

Clark, Marguerite 50 

Clawson, Dal 417 

Clayton. Marguerite 26 

Clermont Photoplays Corp. 380 

Cline, Eddie 370 

Collins, Treve 410 

Commonwealth Film Corp. . 298 

Compson, Betty 31 

Conklin, Wm 471 

Conway, Jack 407 

Condon, Mabel (Exchange) 516 

Cooper, J. Gordon 416 

Cooper, Wm. S. 510 

Cosmopolitan Productions. . 

306-308-310-312-314 

Courtot, Marguerite 432 

Cox, George L 230 

Criterion Pictures Co 524 

Crosland, Alan 124 

Cumberland, John 439 

Cunningham, Jack 362 

Curtis. Catherine Corp. . . . 320 

D 

Dana, Viola 166 

Davies, Marion 308 & 314 

Davis, Chas. J 513 

Davis, Mildred 228 

Davison, Grace 150 

Daw, Marjorie 400 

Dawn, Norman 452 

Dazey. Chas. T 330 

De 'Grasse, Joseph 224 

De Cordova, Leander 162 

Dean, Faxon 504 

Dean, Priscilla 547 

Del Ruth, Hampton 192 

Dent, Vernon 468 

Desmond. Wm 258 

Destenay, L 530 

Dillon, Jack 170 

Donaldson, Arthur Produc- 
tions 302 

Dowlan. Wm. C 130 

Drew, Mrs. Sidney 14 

Du Bray, J. A 507 

Duncan, William 398 

Dunmyre, L. H 515 

Dunn, Winifred 518 

Dwan. Allan 6 

E 

Eagler, Paul E 429 

Earle, W. P. S 465 

Easons 412 

Edmonds & Bouton, Inc. . . 520 

Elvidge, June 244 

Emerson. John ... 98 

Empey. Arthur Guy Prod. . 

338-340-342-344-346-348-350 

Empire State Engraving Co. 394 
Estee Studios & Laboratory, 

Inc 138 

Export & Import Film Co. 520 

F 

Fairfax, Marion .... 103 & 400 

Falkner-Tyrol Productions 524 

Famous Players-Lasky . . 1 - B 

Farnum, Dustin 55 

Fawcett, George 434 

Federal Phptoplays 405 

Fidelity Pictures Co 523 

Fielding, Romaine 140 

Fillmore. Clyde 17a 

Film Sales Company 518 

Film Service Bureau, Inc. 523 

Fine Arts Pictures, Inc. . . 396 

First National 61 

Fishback, Fred, Comedies.. 437 

Fishbcck, Harry A 154 

64b 



Fitzgerald, Dallas M 444 

Fitzmaurice, George 9 

Fleming, Victor 336 

Flower, A. B. Viragh 186 

Flynn. Emmet J 450 

Ford, Jack 468 

Forman, Tom 160 

Forst, Elmer 477 

Foster, Wm. C 498 

Fox Film Corp 238 

Francis, Alec B 464 

Franklin, Chester M 453 

Franklin, Sidney 110 

Fromme, Warren 517 



Gabourie. Fred 479 

Garetson, Ben 348 

Gandolfi, F. Alexander 511 

Garmes, Lee 426 

Garret, Sidney, Inc 521 

Garson Productions 422 

Gasnier, L .J 332 

Gaston, Mae 328 

Geleng, Louis A. J 513 

Gerber, Neva 455 

Gerrard, Charles 436 

Gevaert Raw Stock 530 

Glazer, J. Bennett 342 

Glendon, J. Frank 70 

Gilbert, John 44 

Goldwyn Pictures Corp. 62 & 63 

Gordon, Chas 126 

Gordon, Vera 421 

Goulding. Edmund 434 

Greeley, Evelyn 24 

Green, Alfred 462 

Gregory, Carl L 501 

Griffith, Corinne 452 

Griffith, D. W 1 - A & 264 

Griffith, Edward 438 

Griffith, Tom, L 200 

H 

Hamilton, 'Gilbert P 176 

Hamilton, Lloyd 234 

Hamilton, Mahlon 46 

Hamilton & White 234 

Hampton, Benjamin B. ... 406 

Hampton, Hope 45 

Hampton, J. D 128 

Hansen, Juanita 190 

Harder, Emil 490 

Harlan, Kenneth D 433 

Hart, Neal 360 

Hart, Wm. S 19 

Hartford, David 263 

Hawkes, Al 522 

Heffron, Thomas N 420 

Henaberry, Joseph 242 

Hersholt, Jean 472 

Hilburn, Percy R 508 

Hillyer, Lambert 20 

Hirsh, Nathan 521 

Hodkinson, W. W 60 

Hogan, James Patrick .... 254 

Holubar, Allen 53 

Hopper, E. Mason 482 

Hopper, Hedda De Wolf . . 474 

Horan. Charles T 152 

Horsley, Wm. Film Lab- 
oratories 519 

Horton, Clara 492 

Hulette, Gladys 268 

Hunt, J. Roy 514 

Hunter, T. Hays ... 424 & 4?5 

Hurst, W. 0 198 



Ince, Thomas H 5 

Ingram, Rex 246 

Ingraham, Lloyd 220 

Inter-Ocean Film Corp. . . 374 

Irving, George 476 



J 

Jackman, John 1 426 

Jacobs. Arthur H 322 

Jensen, Eulalie 492 

Johnson, Edith 398 

Johnson, Merle 450 

Johnson, Tefft 410 

Johnstone. Justine 47 

Junior, John 409 

K 

Keaton, Buster 370 

Keenan, Harry G 326 

Kelly, Anthony Paul 206 

Keepers, Harry L 350 

King, Bradley 473 

King, Burton- 446 

King, Henry 216 

Kirby, Frank Gordon 515 

Knoles Harley 94 

Kyson, Chas. H 480 

L 

Lake, Alice 148 

Landis. Cullen 447 

La Rue, Fontine 458 

Lee, Harry 346 

Lee, Rowland 469 

Legend Film Corp 408 

.Lesser, Sol 240 

Lewis, Edgar 66 

Lewis, Mitchell 112 

Lewis, Ralph 440 

Lewis, Vera 440 

Linder, Max 366 

Lisa. Mona 282 

Lichtig & Rothwell, Inc. . . 209 

Lincoln. E. K. . . 15 

Lloyd, Frank 116 

Lloyd, Harold 158 

Lloyds Film Storage . . . Inside 
Front Cover 

Loos, Anita 98 

Los Angeles Chamber of 

Commerce 400 - A 

Losee, Frank 248 

Love, Montagu 488 

Lovely, Louise 172 

Luther, Anne 54 

Lynch, John 88 

Lyons, Chester A 509 

Lyons & Mbran 490 

Lytell, Bert 13 

Me 

McCarthy, John P. Produc- 
tions 296 

McKenzie Mrs. Bob 426 

McKenzie. Ida May 426 

Mac Donald, Wallace 27 

MacDowell, Nelson 449 

MacLean, Douglas 38 

MacQuarrie, George 456 

MasRae, Henry 322 

M 

Madison, Cleo 34 

Marsh, Oliver T 511 

Marshall, Roy E 464 

Marshall, Tutly 102 

Martin, Florence Evelyn . . 340 

Martinelli, Arthur 507 

Mason, Sarah J 448 

Master Films 174 

Mathis, June 104 

May, Ann 134 

May, Doris 39 

Mayflower Photoplay Corp 392 

Meaney, Don 388 

Melford, George 51 

Menasco, Milton 480 

Metcalfe, Earl 441 

Metro Pictures Corp. . . 32 - A 

Miller, Ashley 461 

Miller, Walter 437 

Mitchell, Howard 204 

Mix, Tom 40 

Moore, Colleen 400 

Moore, Tom 72 

Moran, William 439 

Moreno, Antonio 146 

Morrison, James Woods ... 84 



Mullin, Eugene 279 

Murphy, Richard 488 

N 

Neibuhr, Walter 384 

Neilan. Marshall 3 

Neilan, Marshall Players . . 400 

Neill, R. William 68 

New York Concert League 519 

Niblo, Fred 100 

Nilsson, Anna Q 449 

Noble, Jack 120 

Normand, Mabel 28 

Novak, Eva 18 

o 

O'Brien, Eugene 10 

O'Brien, Jack 376 

O'Connor, Mary 446 

O'Connor, Loyola 446 

O'Malley, Pat 400 

Oakman, Wheeler 463 

Oland, Warner 431 

Ormston, Frank D 479 

Ostriche, Muriel Prod 516 

Otto, Henry 76 

Overbaugh, Roy F 506 

P 

Pallette, Eugene 451 

Park, Ida May 224 

Parke. William 443 

Parker, Albert 252 

Pascale, Diane . . . 457 

Paton, Stuart 254 

Pawn, Doris 260 

Peebles, Mort 442 

Perret, Leonce 354 

Peters, George 508 

Phillips, Dorothy 52 

Pickford Jack 462 

Pioneer Film Co. 368 

Powell, Paul 142 

Power, Nicholas Co. Back Cover 

Price, C. B. Co 413 

Pring, Gerald 254 

Q 

Quinn, Arthur T 509 

Quinn, Philip 344 

R 

Ray, Charles, Prod 214 

Read. J. Parker Jr 8 

Reicher, Frank 96 

Reid, Wallace 118 

Reynolds, Lynn F. .-. 458 

Roach Hal 158 

Robertson, John S 78 

Robertson Cole 64 A 

Rockett Film Corp 415 

Roland, Ruth 4S6 

Rosen, Philip 136 

Rosher, Charles 502 

Ross, Thomas W 466 

Rosson, Arthur 30 

Rothacker Film Mfg. Co. . . 528 

Roubert, Matty 250 

Ruggles, Wesley 463 

Russell, William 208 

s 

Salisbury, Monroe 356 

Sanborn Laboratories 525 

Santschi, Tom 226 

Saunders, Jackie 460 

Scardon, Paul 23 

Schenck, Harry 469 

Schertzinger. Victor 29 

Schlank; Morris R 364 

Security Trust & Savings 

Bank 460 

Seessel, Charles 0 294 

Seitz, George B 430 

Sellers, Ollie 470 

Semels, Harry 431 

Sennett. Mack 4 

Sherman, Lowell 442 

Sherry, J. Barney 400 

Shipman, Ernest Prod. 316 & 
318 

Shipman, Edna 409 

Simpson, Russell 459 

Sloane, Paul H 292 



64c 



Sloman, Edward 222 

Small, Edward. Inc 529 

Smith, R. Cecil 80 

Special Pictures Corp 300 

Spence, Ralph 411 

Stahl. John M 288 

Standing Wyndham 86 

Stanley Co. of America .... 304 

Stanton, Fred 284 

Steck. H. Tipton 459 

Stedman, Myrtle 114 

Stevens, Louis 471 

Stewart, Anita 41 

Stewart, Lucille Lee 438 

Stewart, Roy 435 

Stone, Le Roy 21 

Stonfc, Lewis S 262 

Storm, Jerome ^ 1D6 

Stradling. Harry 202 

Stuart, Kathryne 414 

Stumar, John S 506 

Submarine Film Corp 59 

Sunlight Arc Corp 526 

Swedish Biograph Co 154 

Sweet, Blanche ••••i£S^.'«yi»W 

Swickard, Charles 56 

Swickard, Josef ... 57 

T 

Taylor, Wm. D.. 280 

Tell, Alma r 378 

Tell, Olive 378 

Terriss, Tom 25 

Terwilliger, George W. . . . 466 

Thomson, Frederick A 476 

Thompson, Hamilton 486 

Thompson. Hugh 188 

Trebaol, L. Children 517 

Toler. Sidney 447 

Tooker, Wm. H 456 

Tourneur, Maurice 7 

Travis, Norton C 500 

Trevelyn, Una 443 

Trimble, Laurence 472 

Tyrol, Jacques 467 

Tucker, George Loane .... ^ - 2 s 

u 

United Society of Cinema- 

tojjraphers 4. . .>< .j . , . 503 

Universal City 401 

Unsell, Eve 202 

Vale, Travers 418 

Valli, Virginia 61 

Van Buren, Ned 502 

Vermilyea, L. J 478 

Vidor, King 36 

Vignoia, Robert G. . . 48 & 49 

Vincent. James .82 

■ Vogeding, Fredrik 212 



Walton, Gladys 144 

Ward, Hap. H 426 

Warde, Ernest C 433 

Warrenton, Gilbert 475 

Warrenton. Lule 475 

Washburn, Bryant 278 

"Way Down East" 264 

Webb. Kenneth 196 

Weber, Lois .... . . . ... . . 11 

Weigel, Paul 451 

Wells, Harold 474 

White, Jack 234 

Whitlock, Lloyd T 470 

Whitney, Claire ;.. v 7* 

Willat Irvin V. Prod. ... 428 

Williams, Earle 92 

Williamson, J. E 58 

Willis & Inglis 232 

Windsor, Claire 37 

Withcy, Chet 405 

Worsley, Wallace 445 

Wray, John Griffith 46' 

Wright, Tenny 4S3 

Wynard, Edward 504 

Y 

Young, Clara Kimball .... 423 

Young, James 132 



OUTLOOK AND RESUME 

By J. Dannenberg, Editor of Wid's Daily 



In an industry fraught with changes of light- 
ning like rapidity the coming year (Sept. 1, 1920, 
to Aug. 31, 1921) looms conspicuously. That 
it promises more radical and important changes 
than have heretofore occurred, is hardly deniable 
This is due to many conditions. The entry of 
Wall Street and modern business methods into 
the industry; while the solidification of various 
interests, producers, distributing and exhibiting, 
all tend to indicate that many important changes 
will occur. The industry is getting tighter and 
tighter all the time ; 

The prediction has been made by men of im- 
portance that during the coming year the exhibit- 
ing end of this business will probably be composed 
of three or at the most four distinct chains ex- 
tending from coast to coast. On the other hand, 
independent production promises to be stronger 
than ever. 

Passing from these possibilities is the promise of 
greater, more serious and more dignified produc- 
tions than the industry has even known. 

One of the most interesting events in anticipa- 
tion is the arrival of Sir James M. Barrie, who is 
scheduled to come to this country in the Fall to 
assist in making "Peter Pan" at Hollywood for 
Famous Players-Lasky. 

During the coming year difficulties resulting 
from the war with regard to labor and necessary 
material for building construction will be greatly 
relieved and there promises an era of theater v 
expansion, building and improvements never 
equalled. It is impossible to estimate the volume 
of building operations scheduled but it runs into 
the millions. 

Prices generally promise an advance on the 
part of exhibitors. What with the increased cost 
of operation and rental values, higher admissions 
are practically a necessity. There will be greater 
competition on the part of exhibitors. The day 
has gone when an exhibitor can support his 
house by leaning against the box office window. 

One of the serious phases of the coming year 
is the possibility of various branches of the in- 
dustry becoming unionized subjecting all exhib- 
itors, distributors and producers to the various 
annoying difficulties which unionism develops. 
And an instance of this is the fact that on the 
lower East Side of New York City, theater em- 
ployees, from scrub women to ushers and house 
managers have been unionized and are today 
securing by virtue of their demand, prices material- 
ly higher than the exhibitors in this section ever 
dreamed of paying for services. In the studios 
and laboratories the unionism of employees has 
rapidly developed and promises to become even 
more so. 

RESUME OF THE YEAR 

A year ago there was a promise of a distinct 
and radical change in the operations of the indus- 
try. And these developed hardly without hesita- 
tion from September. Most conspicuous of 
all was the development into an organization of 
more strength than has ever existed by the ex- 
hibitors of the United States. As a result of 
several meetings there finally was organized in 
Cleveland in June, the Motion Picture Theater 
Owners of America. Sydney S. Cohen of New 
York City was elected president and activities 
immediately started, most notable of which was 
the action of a special Committee of Nine, the pur- 
pose of which was to place on record the producer- 
distributors who were invading the exhibition 
field. As a result, Adolph Zukor of Famous 
Players went on record saying that his organiza- 
tion woud not extend its activities excepting where * 
it was impossible for pictures of his company to 
be given presentation. A considerable "tempest 
in a teapot" resulted from the promise of Mr. 
Zukor to the committee that he would have Alfred 
S. Black of New England and S. A. Lynch of the 
Southern Enterprises co operate along the same 
lines. After discussing conditions with the Com- 
mittee, Lynch finally went on record against the 
Zukor pledge and Black flatly refused to dis- 
cuss his activities with the Committee. 



During the year, L. J. Selznick, with C. R. 
Seelye formed the National Picture Theaters along 
the same lines as United Picture Theaters which 
went into the hands of a receiver. 

Through the efforts of F. C. Quimby. formerly 
of Pathe, the Associated Exhibitors, Inc., was 
also formed, Harry Crandall of Washington being 
elected president. 

Doubtless the most conspicuous event among 
producers during the year was the formation of 
Associated Producers consisting of Thomas H. 
Ince, Mack Sennett, Marshall Neilan, Allan Dwan, 
George Loane Tucker, Maurice Tourneur and J. 
Parker Read, Jr. Oscar A. Price, formerly pres- 
ident of United Artists became the executive head 
of this organization and F. B. Warren who re- 
signed from the W. W. Hodkinson Corp., its gen- 
eral manager. The advent of Marcus Loew 
backed by Morgan capital into the production 
field by buying into Metro Pictures Corp., was 
also an interesting development. Loew contends 
that he was practically forced into the producing 
end of the business to insure a sufficient number 
of productions for his large string of theaters 
numbering 70, to be augmented by 23 houses to 
be erected this Fall. 

There was considerable excitment in December 
when for 24 hours D. W. Griffith was lost at sea. 

The resignation of Samuel G_oldwyn from the 
head of Goldwyn Pictures late in August was an- 
ticipated by reports of friction in that organiza- 
tion. There was material interest over the fact 
that Cecil B. DeMille has signed for five years 
with Famous Players. Incidentally there were a 
number of changes in the personnel of Famous 
Players including the retirement of Walter E. 
Greene, formerly vice-president, of Albert Kauf- 
man and Walter Irwin. 

During the year Famous Players, Loew, Gold- 
wyn and Griffith offered their stocks to the public 
through the medium of Wall Street. 

One of the interesting developments of the year 
was the arrival of W. G. Faulkner as representa- 
tive of Lord Northcliffe to investigate film con- 
ditions. Incidentally the Stoll interests of London 
are reported to be planning the opening of ex- 
changes throughout America, while on the coast 
G. B. Samuelson, the well known London pro- 
ducer, made several productions. 

The Federal Trade Commission in March, 1920, 
completed its investigation of the operations of 
the Saenger Amusement Co. of New Orleans and 
is at this time actively engaged with reference to 
a number of matters effecting the industry. 

Wm. G. McAdoo resigned as head of United 
Artists and was succeeded by Hiram Abrams. 

With the advent of the National Booking Co. 
with chief offices in the Broadway Theater Bldg., 
New York, came reports from Seattle that Jensen 
and Von Herberg had organized the Independent 
Exhibitors Circuit in the Northwest with 123 
houses. There was talk of Lynch forming a big 
booking combine in localities of 10,000 popula- 
tion and less in the South but this did not develop. 

State Rights operators organized the Federated 
Film Exchanges of America with W. E. Shal- 
lenberger as manager. 

The first international exposition relative to pic- 
tures since the Great War opened in Amsterdam, 
Holland, on Aug. 12. There was considerable in- 
terest in New York when the Franco American 
Cinemetograph of France announced its plans 
which incidentally had to do with controlling the 
operations of 2,000 theaters in Europe. Many in 
the industry believed that the idea was principally 
for the purpose of selling of stock and the Pathe 
interests eventually denied officially that their 
organization was controlled by the Franco- 
American as announced. 

In mid-August Tom Moore of Washington 
created somewhat of a sensation by issuing a 
statement declaring that he had sold his fran- 
chise in First National because of his fear of 
First National being tied up with the National 
Booking Co. 



64d 



ROBERTSON-COLE 



Presenting 
During 1920-21 Season 

Only Su6er- Specials 

+s JL JL 



f 



THE motion picture trade eon- 
cedes that Robertson-Cole has 
by its "honesty of purpose" 
policy and by the superior class of 
its productions built for itself a 
secure foundation and an enviable 
reputation in this industry. 

"To further strengthen this two- 
fold combination and to increase the 
elaborateness and entertainment 
value of its pictures, Robertson-Cole 
has secured stars, directors and 
stories in keeping with its promise 
to give the exhibitors the foremost 
attractions obtainable, regardless 
of the investment required. 

"During 1920*21 only super- 
specials will be J distributed by 
Robertson-Cole. To properly 
present these productions to exhib- 
itors will mean an expenditure of 
millions. However, each release 
must be of sufficiently high calibre 
to attain the standard by which 
Robertson-Cole has established 
itself in the industry, or it shall 
not be offered, to exhibitors. 

"By our progress we are justified 
in believing that we have the ex- 
hibitors' confidence. We intend to 
maintain it — and we shall — with 
really big specials of assured box 
office values, plus a sound business 
administration.'' 




A.. S. KIRKPATR ICK 



Vi.-.-Pr.-i.t.-i.t ami Om-ral M,<i.,>h i 
HO IS I' Kisoveot.h DlS't HJU! 
COKPORATIO?* 



The Year in Headlines 



Saturday, Aug. 30 

Famous 1 Players to build theater in St. 
Louis. 

Louis Burston sues Grace Darmond for 
$31,500 damages. 

New cartoon series called "Screen Fol- 
lies." 

Capt. F. F. Stoll making spectacle call- 
ed "Determination." 

Tuesday, Sept. 2 

"Broken Blossoms" for United Artists 
release. 

Reported theaters in mid-west combin- 
ing for co-operative booking organiza- 
tion. 

Sol Lesser to make five-reeler with 
Sennett bathing girls. 

Zion Films, Inc., reorganized. 
Wednesday, Sept. 3 

United Artists pays $350,000 and 20 per 
cent on receipts for Famous Players' 
share in "Broken Blossoms." 

"Miracle Man" breaking records at all 
openings. 

Famous Players salesmen promise a 
million dollars worth of business during 
Paramount-Artcraft week to Adolph Zu- 
kor. 

"The Lost Battalion" to be shown at 
Cohan. 

Allgood Pictures Corp. formed. To 
make serial starring Charles Hutchinson. 

Theater circuits raising admission price. 

Famous Players to establish 28 non- 
theatrical exchanges. 

Thursday, Sept. 4 

Griffith leases estate at New Rochelle 
for eastern production headquarters. 

Joseph L. Plunkett leaves Famous 
Players. 

Fox reported after theaters in Europe. 

Texas exhibitors booking all big com- 
panies except Famous Players. 

Friday, Sept. 5 

Famous Players to open six Canadian 
offices. 

Saenger Amusement warns Southern 
exhibitors against "syndicate with offices 
in Atlanta." 

Arrow gets distribution of "Lightning 
Bryce." 

Herman Brown lining up Northwest- 
ern exhibitors for new circuit. 

St. Louis film men tender dinner to J. 
C. Ragland. 

Howells, exporter, sees Italy making 
determined fight to regain old time place 
in film field. 

Saturday, Sept. 6 

Goldwyn enters third year of existence. 
Theater Owners Association of Los 
Angeles urge tax repeal. 

Rcmbusch of M. P. E. A. trying to line 



up Saenger circuit and other exhibitors 
through southern section for membership 
in the League. 

Monday, Sept. 8 

Bettina, noted Italian actress, to appear 
in Metro pictures. 

Famous Players acquire screen rights 
to all George Broadhurst productions. 

Harry Reichenbach returns from the 
coast. Says 80 per cent of "Eyes of 
Youth" sold. 

Riskin Bros, form company to produce 
stage successes of Victor Moore on 
screen. 

C. R. Seelye resigns as secretary of 
United Pictures. 

Griffith to have permanent headquar- 
ters in the East. 

Tuesday, Sept. 9 

Famous Players to build theater in Buf- 
falo. 

Waldorf Photoplays to produce "Kis- 
met" with Otis Skinner. 

Goldwyn organizes play-reading de- 
partment. 

Understood B. S. Moss will erect 
twelve theaters in New York State. 

Earle Williams renews Vitagraph con- 
tract. 

Florida exhibitors plan state organiza- 
tion. 

Wednesday, Sept. 10 

Universal to distribute 21,000,000 ft. of 
industrials. 

Famous takes Burlingham scenics. 
Thursday, Sept. 11 

Pete Smith leaves Famous to join 
Marshall Neilan organization. 

Keith and Proctor theaters now mem- 
bers of Exhibitors' League of New York. 

First National to release Mildred Har- 
ris Chaplin productions. 

Raymond Wells announces he wil" film 
scenes from the Bible. 

Famous Players buys Putnam Build- 
ing. Will erect permanent home and 
theater on site. 

Paul Gulick elected president of A. M. 
P. A. 

Friday, Sept. 12 

Producers expected to give in to de- 
mands of studio help. 

Fox in deal for Woods theater, Chi- 
cago. 

Griffith delivers first picture to First 
National. 

Universal to film big special in New 
Orleans. 

Saturday, Sept. 13 

Jos. L. Plunkett to have charge of Eu- 
ropean offices for Select. 

Cable advice says Germany preparing 
to compete for world-wide hold on film 



65 



market. 

Syd Chaplin returns from France with 
30,000 feet of film. 

Prominent English exhibitors say 90 
per cent American films used in England. 
Monday, Sept. 15 

Marshall Neilan secures "Penrod" se- 
ries. 

Sam Zierler leaves "Big U" to head 
Commonwealth Corp. 

Hobart Henley to release through 
Pathe. 

Moe Mark to build 20 theaters to be 
known as "Mark-Strand." 

Five years before Famous can occupy 
Putnam building, recently purchased. 

Annette Kellerman Educational Pic- 
tures organized in Los Angeles. 

Tuesday, Sept. 16 

800 studio employes strike in Holly- 
wood. 

David Horsley to produce again. 

Famous Players to build theater in 
Lewiston, Me. 

Wednesday, Sept. 17 

Isaac Wolper forming Robert W. 
Chambers Picture Corp. to produce 
works of author. 

"Big 4" discussing distribution plans. 

Edwin Carewe productions for release 
through Pathe. 

Fox extends distributing system to 
western Canada. 

King W. Vidor severs connection with 
Brentwood Film Co. 

Reported S. A. Lynch about to invade 
Northwest. 

Thursday, Sept. 18 

United Picture Producing listed on 
curb. 

Aliens buy Lone Star Chaplin series 
for Canadian distribution. 

William Collier making series of com- 
edies for Jos. M. Schenck. 

Goldwyn trying to secure physical dis- 
tribution for "Big Four." 

R. Wm. Neill. and George Irving to di- 
rect for English firm abroad. 

Florida exhibitors combat theater buy- 
ing operations of Lynch Enterprises. 
Friday, Sept. 19 

Educational reorganizes and forms 
$2,500,000 company with Hudson Bay Co. 
as backer. 

First National expected to distribute 
pictures of new $5,000,000 English Com- 
pany. 

Saturday, Sept. 20 

Big Four and Goldwyn deny combine. 
Loew takes over Staub in Knoxville, 
Tenn. 

Taylor- Holmes Prod., Inc., organized. 

M. P. E. A. asks aid of New York 
League in securing repeal of Federal 
taxes. 

Famous leases Triangle studio in Yon- 
kers. 

Monday, Sept. 22 

Carl Laemmle says lack of stars is rea- 
son for high rentals 



•Boston exhibitors organize. 
Spiegel buys Rialto in Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Roma — New York starts work in Italy. 
Tuesday, Sept. 23 

Ernest H. Horstmann, United Picture 
Theaters stockholder, calls meeting re- 
garding finances of organization. 

Nixon-Nirdlinger circuit, Philadelphia, 
and Stanley Theaters pooled. 

Goldwyn to build experimental labo- 
ratory. 

Northwest exhibitors ready to wage 
war against high rentals. 

Edwin Carewe to produce in Europe 
for Pathe release. 

Wednesday, Sept. 24 

Statement from United Picture Thea- 
ters regarding Horstmann charge. 

T. L. Tally buys the Kinema, Los 
Angeles. 

Pathe to star Juanita Hansen in series. 

Loew buys eight houses in South. 
Thursday, Sept. 25 

Horstmann says managers resigning 
from United. 

Two bills up in Minnesota Legislature 
which would kill business if passed. 

Alfred S. Black gets eight more houses 
in New Hampshire and Vermont. 

Gradwell out of World Film. 

Friday, Sept. 26 

Number of prominent exhibitors to 
gather here Tuesday for Horstmann 
United Picture Theaters meeting. 

Maclyn Arbuckle to appear in stories 
by Irvin S. Cobb and George Barr Mc- 
Cutcheon. 

Stanley Co. of America acquires two 
theaters in Camden, N. J. 

Famous Players reported about to 
change its theater plans. 

National Association calls meeting to 
form film delivery organization. 

Saturday, Sept. 27 

Goldwyn may build theaters. 

Zukor returns from Canada: 

Famous Players to start theater on Put- 
nam Bldg. site without interfering with 
existing leases. 

Monday, Sept. 29 

Exhibitors arriving to attend United 
conference. 

Wall Street interests reported seeking 
financing of theater chains. 

"Smiling Bill" Parsons, president of 
National Film, dies in Los Angeles. 
Tuesday, Sept. 30 

Committee named at Horstmann meet- 
ing to investigate United Picture Thea- 
ters' books. 

United Artists turn down Goldwyn's 
plan to build theaters for joint exhibition. 

N. A. M. P. I. adopt resolutions ask- 
ing P. A. Powers to remain a member of 
the Board of Directors. 

Famous Players declare annual 2 per 
cent dividend. 



67 




R. WILLIAM NEILL 

PRODUCTIONS 1920 



The Career of Kathenne Bush 

The Band Box 

The Inner Voice 

The Woman Gives with 

Yes or No with 

Good Reference with 

Dangerous Business with 



By R. William Neill 
Norma Talmadge 
Norma Talmadge 
Constance Talmadge 
Constance Talmadge 



68 



Wednesday, Oct. 1 

United stockholders start investigation. 
Hyman Winik to build $4,000,000 theater 
in the Bronx. 

Macauley to make series starring Ber- 
nard Durning for World release. 

Loew planning expansion of theatrical 
interests involving over $100,000,000. 

Miller's California, Los Angeles, re- 
ported leased to Goldwyn. • 
Thursday, Oct. 2 

Committee at work looking into United 
Picture affairs. 

Mrs. Pickford in New York looking for 
stories for Mary. 

Motion Picture Theater Attendants 
Union present demands to theater owners. 

Texas Exhibitor's organization elect 
president. 

S. L. Rothapfel forms own company. 

United Amusement Co. capitalized at 
$250,000 to operate in five southern states. 

Mureal Productions, Inc., formed to 
star Madame Mureal. 

Friday, Oct. 3 

Famous Players and B. S. Moss break 
connections. 

Chairman of investigating committee 
issues statement on United Picture affair. 

Universal to make series of fire preven- 
tion films. 

D. W. Griffith leaves Los Angeles for 
the East. 

Saturday, Oct. 4 

Sam E. Rorke forms producing com- 
pany. 

Reported Sol. Lesser will produce 
features. 

Mitchell Lewis completes contract with 
Select. 

Monday, Oct. 6 

D. W. Griffiths arrives in New York ro 
make headquarters here. 

Goldwyn denies Fairbank's statement 
relative to plan for showing Big Four 
productions. 

First National directors convene for 
semi-annual meeting. 

Tuesday, Oct. 7 

Robertson-Cole to distribute through 
its own exchanges. 

Hallmark takes over Exhibitors Mutual 
exchanges and will handle Chaplins. 

Petition in bankruptcy filed against 
United Picture Theaters. 

No repeal expected in regard to picture 
taxes. 

Pathe and Selznick to announce co- 
operative ideas in which exhibitors are 
to be interested. 

Wednesday, Oct. 8 

Jensen and Von Herberg deny they 
have withdrawn from First National. 

Famous Players plan theaters in Ohio. 

Reported that E. H. Hulsey has sold 
out to Lynch Enterprises. 

Federal Court hearing in United Picture 
Theaters bankruptcy proceedings. 
Thursday, Oct. 9 

Harry Zalkin, named as receiver for 



United Picture Theaters. 

Charles Pathe here from Europe. 

Fox foreign force in New York. 

C. L. Chester forms $200,000 company. 

E. H. Hulsey refuses to discuss report 
that he has sold out to S. A. Lynch. 
Friday, Oct. 10 

J. A. Berst of United issues statement 
regarding receivership of company. 

First National meeting over — directors 
leave for home. 

S. A. Lynch invading Florida on large 
scale. 

Saturday, Oct. 11 

Loew stock on New York curb. 
Metro leases Sixty-First St. studio, New 
York. 

Reported Goldwyn secures Savoy in 
'Frisco and California in Los Angeles. 

United Amusement Co. starts work in 
combating Lynch Enterprises in Texas. 
Tuesday, Oct. 14 

J. A. Berst and Ernest Horstmann 
issue statements regarding United Pic- 
ture Theaters' receivership. 

J. P. Morgan millions reported back of 
new $100,000,000 Loew organization. 

Charles C. Pettijohn to join Selznick 
organization in important capacity. 
Wednesday, Oct. 15 

National Picture Theaters, Inc., formed 
with $15,000,000 capital. Thought to be 
Selznick move. 

Sulzer's Park in Harlem bought for 
studio. 

Thursday, Oct. 16 

Joseph F. Lee leaves Louis B. Mayer 
organization. 

Hobart Henley leases 125th St. studio. 

A. S. Kirkpartrick made general man- 
ager of Robertson Cole Distributing Corp. 

Famous Players to issue $10,000,000 in 
8 per cent, cumulative preferred stock. 
Friday, Oct. 17 

Selznick buys property for $1,500,000 
studio on Long Island. 

Lew Cody specials to be distributed by 
Robertson Cole. 

L. J. Selznick reported again active in 
World Film. 

Powers Film Products declare special 
5 per cent, dividend. 

B. S. Moss to erect at least six houses 
in New England. Loew buys eight in 
Texas. 

Arthur Ziehm secures foreign rights to 
series of Hall Room Boy Comedies. 
Saturday, Oct. 18 

Harold J. Binney promoting Canadian 
Photo-Play Productions, Ltd., with a half 
million capital. 

Mae Murray signs with International. 
Monday, Oct. 20 

Shirley Mason and Buck Jones signed 
with Fox. 

Bray Pictures Corp. secure Interna- 
tional Film cartoon for Goldwyn release. 
Tuesday, Oct. 21 
First National signs King Vidor. 



69 



Nat Rothstein leaves Universal for 
Equity. 

Thomas Meighan to be starred by 
ramous. 

Bankruptcy proceedings against United 
dismissed. 

Selznick secures control of World Film 
Organizes Republic, taking over World 
Exchanges. 

Wednesday, Oct. 22 

R. A. Walsh signed by Mayflower 

Percy L. Waters out of Triangle. 

Harry R ap f to build permanent coast 
organization for Selznick Pictures. 
Thursday, Oct. 23 

Selznick to produce at Brunton plant 
in Hollywood. 

Reported Allen Holubar to produce in- 
dependently. 

Moss to build in Bronx. 
.„ ft F ™ ol| s Players increase caiptal $20, 
000,000 of preferred and 250,000 shares of 
common. 

Friday, Oct. 24 

Capitol Theater, New York, opens. 

Alma Rubens signed by Cosmopolitan 
for release through Famous Players. 

E H. Hulsey admits alliance with S. 
A. Lynch Enterprises. 

Saturday, Oct. 25 

Pathe buys property in Long Island. 

I* ox starts national advertising cam- 
paign. 

B. S. Moss to build in Brooklyn. 

Famous may purchase Palmer prop- 
erty in Chicago. 

Monday, Oct. 27 

Booth Tarkington signed by Goldwyn 
to write series of two-reel comedies. 

Griffith to have four studios. 

Reported International taking over 
Sultzer's Harlem River Park for studio. 
Tuesday, Oct. 28 

Reported Ackerman and Harris, vaud- 
eville theater owners, after picture the- 
aters in West. 

Charles Miller signed by Mayflower 
for series of out-door specials. 

Stella Mayhew Prod. Inc., to make 
comedies. 

Wednesday, Oct. 29 

Triangle to revive old pictures under 
weekly release. 

L. J. Selznick forms National Picture 
Theaters, Inc.— co-operative exhibitor 
idea. 

C. E. Whitehurst and associates pur- 
chase Parkway interests in Baltimore, 
and control first runs. 

Exchangemen from all over country 
meet to organize in New York. 

Thursday, Oct. 30 

Coast reports indicate that Thomas H 
Ince, Marshal Neilan, Mack Sennett 
Maurice Tourneur, Ceorge Loane Tucker 
and Allan Dwan are to combine at end 
of existing contracts and release under 
co-operative plan, under name of Assoc. 
Producing Corp. 

Exchangemen in meeting spoil plans 



laid and organize among themselves, re- 
fusing to disband their present organiza- 
tion to join Natl. Asso. 

Wm. A. Brady talking of returning to 
producing. 

Carlyle Blackwell back from Coast with 
first independent production. 

Friday, Oct. 31 
Mae Marsh signs for two years with 
Sydney L. Cohan. 

Harold J. Binney fined in Toronto for 
violation of "Companies Act." 

Famous Players sell rights to Central 
European distribution through Danish 
American Film Co., Ltd. 

Saturday, Nov. 1 
Loew to take over two houses and 
build in Toronto. 

Northwest exhibitors form Exhibitors 
Protective League of the Northwest. 

Reported Loew to buy Ackerman and 
Harris circuit of theaters in west. 

Monday, Nov. 3 
Reported Poli and Fox circuits have 
combined to keep Famous Players out of 
New England. 

National Association to raise funds to 
fight censorship and Sunday opening 
problems. 

F. I. L. M. Clubs form national organ- 
ization. 

Mrs. Pickford buys rights to "Little 
Lord Fauntleroy" for Mary. 

Wednesday, Nov. 5 

Frohman Amusement Co. signs Myna 
Cunard to appear in two-reel westerns. 

Equity Picture Corp. denied injunction 
against Select and C. K. Y. Film Corp. 

Alfred S. Black adds theaters to chain, 
making forty in all. 

Thursday, Nov. 6 

Loew takes over western circuit of 
Ackerman and Harris. 

Pathe to act as releasing agent for As- 
sociated Exhibitors, Inc., new co-opera- 
tive organization. 

Mabel Normand renews contract with 
Goldwyn. 

Committee of Research, Review and 
Recommendation formed to select pic- 
tures for churches, colleges and commun- 
ity centers. 

Friday, Nov. 7 

Stock assessments of National Picture 
Theaters, Inc., outlined. 

Adolph Zukor to leave for Coast next 
week. 

Eastern studios not worried over coal 
situation. 

Herbert Lubin gets $22,000 compromise 
for placing Mary Miles Minter witli 
Adolph Zukor. 

Potter Palmer denies Palmer House, 
Chicago, will be sold for a theater. 

Ned Finley forms new company to 
make two reelers in North Carolina. 
Saturday, Nov. 8 

Loew to build in Boston. 

Charles D. Isaacson out of Goldwyn. 



71 



Tom Moore 



72 



New Moss theater at 181st St. and 
Broadway to be called Coliseum. 

Monday, Nov. 10 

Walter E. Greene, vice-president of 
Famous Players-Lasky, resigns. 

L. J. Selznick and Laurence Weber to 
star Edith Hallor in series. 

S. A. Lynch buys out Jake Wells' inter- 
ests in South, excepting in Richmond and 
Norfolk. 

Prizma to star Madge Evans. 
Tuesday, Nov. 11 

Saenger Amusement Co. denies report 
that interests are after southern theater 
chain. 

David P. Howells, on return from Eu- 
ropean trip, sees possible closing of for- 
eign markets to American producers. 
Wednesday, Nov. 12 

C. F. Zittell reported out of Interna- 
tional. 

Transatlantic Film Co. to produce. 

Ra3 T mond Hitchcock to appear in films 
for International. 

Frank G. Hall signs Benny Leonard for 
serial. 

Texas exchangemen plan co-operative 
body of Southwestern Exhibitors. 

Thursday, Nov. 13 

C. F. Zittel resumes general manage- 
ment of International Film. 

Metro signs Emma Dunn to star in 
"Old Lady 31." 

John H. Kunsky plans more houses in 
Detroit. 

First National Exhibitors make first 
announcement regarding their plans; ad- 
vising exhibitors not to sell their houses 
and to be careful in signing up long-term 
contracts for film service. 

Friday, Nov. 14 

Lee Ochs resigns from United and will 
take an active part in Second National 
Exhibitors Circuit. 

Albert F. Brentlinger, Indiana exhib- 
itor, will build several large houses for his 
chain. 

Cinema Classics, Inc., to make short 
subjects. 

Alice Lake signed by Metro for five 
years. 

Saturday, Nov. 15 

Second National Exhibitors Circuit to 
have 21 franchise holders in that many 
districts of this country. 

Metro purchases "Four Horsemen of 
the Apocalypse." 

Vitagraph to make a Wallingford se- 
ries. 

Monday, Nov. 17 

World Film directors accept L. J. Selz- 
nick plan by vote of 9 to 2. World to be- 
come part of Republic. 

Taylor Holmes productions to be re- 
leased through Metro. 

Wilkening-Pickford case for commis- 
sion on contract begins in New York. 

Tom North resigns from Fox Film. 

Horater's Pantheon opens at Toledo. 

State right buyers planning co-opera- 



tive buying organization. 

Important directors on Coast officially 
confirm combination. 

Tuesday, Nov. 18 

Associated First National Pictures in- 
corporates with $6,000,000 capital. Asso- 
ciated First National Theaters incorpo- 
rates with $10,000,000 capital. 

Mitchell Lewis isgned for series by 
Metro. 

Wednesday, Nov. 19 

Wm. Fox entertains Prince of Wales 
at Academy of Music, New York. 

Goldwyn advertising campaign to reach 
30,000,000 newspaper readers to start 
Dec. 1. 

Max Linder arrives from France to 
make comedies. 

Thursday, Nov. 20 

Ricord Gradwell announces plans of 
Producers Security Corp. 

Broker sues United Picture Theaters 
for $650,000. 

Graphic Films signs Virginia Pearson. 
Friday, Nov. 21 

Foreign plans of United Artists not ro 
be decided until after Jan. 1, 1920. 

Mary Pickford wins case filed by Cora 
Wilkening for commission on contract. 
Saturday, Nov. 22 

Rialto Theatrical Enterprises Associa- 
tion formed in Lawrence, Mass., to buy 
chain of theaters throughout country. 

John W. Grey and Arthur B. Reeve 
take over Supreme Pictures, Inc. 

Mrs. Humiston loses in suit against 
Universal. 

National Association to start drive 
against censors. 

Monday, Nov. 24 

First National lining up 5,000 theaters. 
First move to secure control in Baltimore 
and Washington. 

Milton Cohen, Bull's-Eye, signs Texas 
Guinan for series of two reelers. 

William Desmond on Pathe program. 
Tuesday, Nov. 25 

Arthur S. Kane resigns from Realart. 

Reported large fraternal organization 
planning to erect chain of picture thea- 
ters. 

Reported Al H. Woods to head film 
producing company. 

C. F. ("Zit") Zittell resigns from Inter- 
national Dec. 1. 

Wednesday, Nov. 26 

Alfred S. Black of Maine extending 
theater holdings in New England. 

Important exhibitor organizations lin- 
ing up to ban free screen advertising. 

Reported Goldwyn stock to be offered 
on New York Curb market. 

Sidney Garrett, prominent exporter, 
sees foreign outlook gloomy for produc- 
ers unless credit system is alleviated. 

Max Spiegel denies Moe Mark Co. is 
to invade exhibiting circles in Middle and 
Far West. 

Thursday, Nov. 27 

Select granted preliminary injunction 



73 



CLAIRE WHITNEY 

"DETERMINATION" 

"LOVE HONOR AND OBEY" 

"THE PASSIONATE PILGRIM" 

Also Featured in the Stage Play 

'THE INNOCENT IDEA" 

At the Fulton Theatre 



74 



against Clara Kimball Young and Equity 
Pictures. 

First National directors hold import- 
ant meeting at Indianapolis. 

Morris Kohn takes charge of Realart 
until Arthur Kane's successor is named. 

Lewis J. Selznick secures large site in 
London for theater and offices. 

Lord Beaverbrook buys large interest 
in Provincial Cinema Theaters of Eng- 
land. Millions involved. 

Saturday, Nov. 29 

Many theaters in Central West to close 
temporarily on accoimt of fuel shortage. 

"Chick" Sales to be starred by Robert- 
son-Cole. 

Wm. M. Vogel returns from abroad 
with statement that there are 200 Ger- 
man producers in the field. 

Monday, Dec. 1 

Duponts and other financial interests 
backing Goldwyn. 

Henry Morgan Hobart made general 
business manager of International. 

Isaac Wolper of Mayflower gets screen 
rights to "Aphrodite." 

Tuesday, Dec. 2 

Associated Producers deny any outside 
affiliation. 

Goldwyn Pictures stock on curb mar- 
ket. 

Jake Wells to develop theatrical enter- 
prises in Virginia in conjunction with 
Wilmer and Vincent and Keith interests. 

Edward Godal of British and Colonial 
Kinematograph Co. of London here to 
sign American stars and directors. 
Wednesday, Dec. 3 

Theaters in four states closed on ac- 
count of fuel situation. 

Art Unit Studios organized to estab- 
lish unit studio proposition. 

Sydney A. Franklin to direct Robt. W. 
Chambers' stories for Mayflower. 

Thomas H. Ince elected president of 
Associated Producers. 

Thursday, Dec. 4 

Broadway to be dark on account of 
fuel shortage. 

Loew plans chain of 16 theaters in De- 
troit. 

J. Frank BrOckliss, Inc., and Arthur 
F. Beck interests lined up with Gibraltar 
Pictures, British producing unit. 

Friday, Dec. 5 

Thomas H. Ince denies Walter . E. 
Greene will lead Associated Producers' 
distributing corporation. 

Pathe reported about to start $1,200,000 
laboratory for raw stock. One already 
designed for Long Island' City. 

Saturday, Dec. 6 

John H. Kunsky, of Detroit, to build 
seven theaters. 

Associated Producers warns exhibitors 
not to sell their theaters. 

Reported Fox to build in Omaha. 
Monday, Dec. 8 

Famous Players secures world rights 
to "Aphrodite." 



Jack Dempsey to appear in serial for 
Pathe release. 

Hunt Stromberg leaves Select to join 
Ince on coast. 

Walter E. Greene returns from Cali- 
fornia. 

Order of fuel commissioner closing 
theaters is rescinded. 

National Exhibitors Circuit of Seattle 
re-elect officers. 

Tuesday, Dec. 9 

Ferndale Film to build big studio on 
Long Island. Will have 12 stages. 

Republic Distributing Corp. to handle 
"Girl of the Sea." 

United Picture Theaters to elect offi- 
cers. 

First National investigation proves one 
day shows passing; longer runs becom- 
ing popular. 

Wednesday, Dec. 10 

Plague in New Orleans interferes with 
shipping. . 

Lubliner & Trinz secure regional fran- 
chise for Associated Exhibitors. 

Reported Griffith to make Biblical 
spectacle. 

Thursday, Dec. 11 

Famous Players offering preferred stock 
to exhibitors. 

Adolph Zukor persistently rumored as 
either having resigned or about to resign 
from Famous Players. 

Jensen and Von Herberg plan $1,500,- 
000 theater in Seattle; acquire 25 more in 
Northwest. 

United Picture officers re-elected. 
Friday, Dec. 12 

Al Kaufman reported out of Famous 
Players. 

Alfred S. Black enters agreement with- 
Universal whereby exhibitors secure pay- 
ment for showing industrial subjects. 

United Picture stockholders have re- 
financing plan under way. 

Saturday, Dec. 13 

D. W. Griffith safe after being lost at 
sea for twenty-four hours. 

Park-Whiteside forms Cinemaplays, 
Inc., to feature Gail Kane and Thurston 
Hall. 

Jans Pictures, Inc., formed by Herman 
F. Jans, Jersey exhibitor and exchange- 
man. 

David Horsley among incorporators or 
Unista Film Mfg. Co. 

Monday, Dec. IS 

Sterling Film, Ltd., Canadian independ- 
ent exchange, to expand. 

Charles C. Burr, assistant general man- 
ager of Famous, resigns to join Arthur 
F. Beck organization. 

G. B .Samuelson, English producer, at 
work on coast. 

Tuesday, Dec. 16 

United Picture theaters to increase out- 
put to 25 features a year. 

Reported John Joseph Harvey nego- 
tiating for company to distribute come- 
dies only. 



75 




HENRY OTTO 

Directing 

MISS PAULINE FREDERICK 

Recent releases 

FAIR and WARMER— THE WILLOW TREE— IRIS 

THE CHEATER 



76 



Dorothy Dalton, Ince star, signs long- 
term contract with Famous Players. 
Wednesday, Dec. 17 

First National announce plans for ex- 
pansion which include control of 5,000 
theaters. 

Olive Tell to be starred in Jans Pic- 
tures. 

Secretary of the Interior Lane inti- 
mates government may officially recog- 
nize part played by picture industry dur- 
ing war. 

Loew to build at 83rd St. and Broad- 
way. 

Educational closes deal with Inter- 
church World Movement. 

Thursday, Dec. 18 

Frank G. Hall reported back of new 
Mir- America Corp. 

Metro after director to produce in Italy 
with Mrs. Bettini as a star. 

Goldwyn reported to build theater in 
San Francisco. 

Friday, Dec. 19 

Eve Balfour, famous British actress, 
arrives in New York. 

Metro buys "Polly With a Past"; Ina 
Claire to be starred. 

Harry Koplar of St. Louis reported to 
expand his theater holdings there. 
Saturday, Dec. 20 

Levy Mayer, counsel for A. L. Erlan- 
ger, reported planning a deal involving 
$50,000,000 to build theaters. 

Fire destroys Solax studios in Fort Lee. 

National Picture Theaters lines up 
southern exhibitors. 

Monday, Dec. 22 

Ohio exhibitors form organization to 
fight alleged inroads of producers. 

Famous Players to center 1920 produc- 
tions on director specials. 

Tuesday, Dec. 23 

English capital backing renewed pro- 
duction of Selig Polyscope Co. 

"Miracle Man" being revived in West 
on stage owing to success of Tucker pro- 
duction. 

Walter Irwin announces formal resig- 
nation from Famous. 

First National announces Jan. 19 as 
date for active existence of new theater 
and producing plan. 

Wednesday, Dec. 24 

Mundus Film of Paris renews contracts 
with American producers; acquires Eu- 
ropean distribution for some Hodkinson 
releases. 

Ben Blumenthal warns American pro- 
ducers of alleged duping of films for Ger- 
many. 

Edward A. Wise, president United Ci- 
gar Stores, elected director of Goldwyn. 
Friday, Dec. 26 

W. W. Hodkinson issues statement re- 
affirming former stand and making new 
suggestions to exhibitors. 

United Picture Theaters, Inc., stock to 
be sold at $350 a share. 

77 



Saturday, Dec. 27 

W eekly financial review sees Wall St. 
interest edging towards picture industry. 

Realart secures distribution of R. A. 
W alsh specials .to be produced by May- 
flower. 

Bill in Congress will make carrying of 
stolen films across state borders a Fed- 
eral offense. 

Adolph Zukor issues statement regard- 
ing theaters. 

Monday, Dec. 29 

Cleveland concern offers stock at $1.00 
a share; withdraw Maxwell Karger's 
name after announcing him as second 
vice-president. 

S.-L. productions to release through 
Metro. 

Seventeen franchises issued by Asso- 
ciated Exhibitors, Inc. 

Tuesday, Dec. 30 

Dwight Macdonald planning to build 
an "Eastern Hollywood" on Long Island. 

Censorship fight threatened in Virginia. 

Alfred S. Black affiliates with Abe 
Spitz of Providence. 

Enwood Feature Picture Co. to supply 
six productions a year for Republic re- 
lease. 

Jackson Film Studios Corp. building 
studio on Westchester Ave. 

Wednesday, Dec. 31 

Harry A. Sherman sues Henry Lehr- 
man for accounting. 

C. B. Price secures American distri- 
bution of "The Log of the U-35." 

Mary Marsh Allen, prominent English 
actress, in New York. 

Hoover film, "Starvation," ■ to play at 
Manhattan Opera House. 

Friday, Jan. 2 

Marcus Loew may take over control of 
Metro. 

Chicago First National franchise 
switched from Jones, Linick and Schaefer 
to Balaban and Katz. 

Morris Kohn, president of Realart, suc- 
ceeding Arthur S. Kane. 

Oliver Morosco to enter producing field. 
Has six units in formation. 

John C. Graham of London sees need 
for many theaters in France and Eng- 
land. 

Saturday, Jan. 3 

Loew takes control of Metro Pictures 
Corp. 

Loew to build in Chicago in conjunc- 
tion with Jones, Linick and Schaefer. 

United States Photoplay Corp. offering 
stock for sale to exhibitors. 

Monday, Jan. 5 

Three millions involved in Loew-Metro 
deal. 

Robertson-Cole take over Hallmark 
exchanges. 

Theda Bara to appear in stage produc- 
tion for Al Wou<K 

First National official claims producers 
force films containing advertising on ex- 
hibitors. 



John S. Robertson 

Director 



"Dr. JEKYLL and Mr. HYDE" 

with JOHN BARRYMORE 

"ERSTWHILE SUSAN" 

with CONSTANCE BINNEY 



Tuesday, Jan. 6 

C. B. Price claims duping in connection 
with official German submarine pictures. 

Lawrence Langner. trade mark attor- 
ney, says foreign trade marks of Ameri- 
can producers are being pirated. 

Reported Al Kaufman will enter pro- 
ducing field as independent. 

Wednesday, Jan. 7 

George Loane Tucker, producer of 
"The Miracle Man," files suit against 
Mayflower and Famous Players, alleging 
violation of contract, etc. 

A. J. Small, Canadian theatrical man, 
missing. Friends fear foul play. 

National Screen Service to offer nov- 
elty trailer to exhibitors. Has exclusive 
contract with leading producers for ma- 
terial. 

Thursday, Jan. 8 

Australasian Films about to merge with 
J. C. Williamson. Would give combine 
60 Australian theaters. 

Clark-Cornelius Chaplins switched from 
Hallmark distribution to Republic. 

Plans being perfected for meeting with 
Secretary of the Interior Lane regarding 
"Americanization" drive via films. 
Friday, Jan. 9 

Adolphe Osso completing details of big 
French company. Building studio in 
Paris. 

Big producers protected on trade mark 
registration in foreign countries. 

Reported Famous Players will drop 
Industrial Department. 

Maxwell Karger of Metro coming East 
shortly. Will produce here. 

Saturday, Jan. 10 

Americanization drive via the films 
opens Feb. 12. 

United Picture Theaters take over Tri- 
angle exchanges. 

Arthur S. Kane, former Realart presi- 
dent, returns from tour. 

First annual meeting of First National 
opens at Atlantic City. 

Monday, Jan. 12 

Over 300 theaters join Ohio First Na- 
tional. 

C. B. Price applies for injunction to 
restrain distribution of alleged duped 
print of U-35 picture. 

Ackerman and Harris to build in Los 
Angeles. Loew will operate. 

Tuesday, Jan. 13 

Declare dividend on Famous Players 
preferred stock. Directors elected for 
next four years. 

Equity Pictures' directors hold meeting 
in Chicago. 

S. L. Rothapfel in New York. Gives 
up management of Goldwyn's California 
theater. 

Al Kaufman announces resignation 
from Famous Players. 

Associated First National Theaters, 
Inc., ready to spend 20 million instead of 
(> million as originally planned. 



Wednesday, Jan. 14 

Reported Loew-Metro after Big Five 
distribution. 

Zukor denies Famous Players building 
theaters; says Wall St. does not control 
company. 

First National members have 75 thea- 
ters under construction in various sec- 
tions of the country. 

Thursday, Jan. 15 

Goldwyn reported to have bought in to 
Ascher Bros. Circuit. 

Loew, Rowland and Engel to leave for 
Californit. May build new studio. 

First National Convention closing. 
Friday, Jan. 16 

Carl Laemmle to contest alleged vio- 
lation of contract by Allen Holubar and 
Dorothy Phillips. 

Control of Exhibitor's Trade Review 
passes from L. F. Blumenthal to A. B. 
Swetland. 

Charles C. Burr producing series of 
comedies with Johnny Hines. 

Saturday, Jan. 17 

United takes over Hallmark distribu- 
tion. 

Goldwyn reported after interest in 
Blank chain in Nebraska. 

Famous Players-Lasky sales force con- 
vention opens in Chicago. 

F. W. Reynolds seeking to acquire 
Swanson-Nolan properties in Denver and 
other western points. 

Board of Governors of Stock Exchange 
admit Loew stock. 

Monday, Jan. 19 

United buys number of S. A. Lynch ex- 
changes in south. 

Reported Allen Holubar to sign with 
Famous. "Big Six" building studio at 
Glendale. 

H. B. Warner features will be released 
through Pathe. 

Tuesday, Jan. 20 

M. P. E. of A. suggests that Henry 
Ford pay for showing Ford's Weekly. 

Malcolm Strauss Co. formed. Will 
release through Republic. 

Morris Gest, theatrical producer, says 1 
that Wall St. control of moving pictures 
is sending theaters "to hell." 

Educational's English company will 
produce features abroad. 

Wednesday, Jan. 21 

Associated First National pictures name 
executive committee and voting trustees. 

Thomas Ince starts series of big 
specials. 

Thursday, Jan. 22 

Famous Players to spend ten million 
on theaters in Canada. 

Arthur S. Kane Pictures Corp. an- 
nounced. 

First National reported after Nazimova, 
Bryant Washburn and Tom Moore. 

Associated Exhibitors, Inc., hold ses- 
sion in New York. 

A. H. Blank reported in combine with 
Abe Frankle in Des Moines. 



Friday, Jan. 23 

Messmore Kendall of Capitol, New 
York president Associated Exhibitors 
claim to have 8,000 theaters lined up. 

Grace Cunard with National Film. 

Pioneer to make pictures of champion- 
ship wrestling bout. 

Saturday, Jan. 24 

Haworth to expand. 

Goldwyn purchases controlling interest 
in Bray Pictures, Corp. 

Sol Lesser and Gore Bros, buy First 
National franchise from Tally. 

Fred C. Quimby resigns from Pathe to 
become general manager of Associated 
Exhibitors. 

Monday, Jan. 26 

Nat C. Olds to join Goldwyn. Likely 
to have charge of advertising. 

Fairbanks interested in production of 
Winchell Smith stories. 

Capitol to change program weekly. 
Tuesday, Jan. 27 

Arthur Kane to be Charles Ray's man- 
ager. 

Marie Doro to appear on Pioneer pro- 
gram. 

Decision reserved in Tucker suit against 
Mayflower and Famous Players. 

Wednesday, Jan. 28 ' 

Louis Burston arranges pooling of in- 
terests of serial makers. 

Fox moving to new building on 55th St. 

Washington reports that industry will 
not be included in 1920 census data. 
Thursday, Jan. 29 

Educational to open 26 exchanges in 
key cities. "Joe" Lee in charge. 

Famous Players' income for 1919 ap- 
proximately four million. 

Fatty Arbuckle to make five-reel fea- 
tures. 

Friday, Jan. 30 

William S. Hart suing Thomas H. Ince 
for $100,000. 

Al St. John comedies to be state righted 
by Warner Bros. 

United Artists secure theater for show- 
ings in Minneapolis. In row with Ruben 
and Finkelstein. 

Saturday, Jan. 31 

Republic Distributing to release six 
Lloyd Carleton productions. 

Jesse D. Hampton and Robertson-Cole 
involved in $100,000 lawsuit over H. B. 
Warner. 

W. H. Clune, of Los Angeles, and 
William Swanson, Salt Lake City, 
directors of National Picture Theaters. 
Monday, Feb. 2 

Betty Compson of "Miracle Man" fame 
forms her own company. To make 
special productions. 

Famous Players balance sheet as of 
Nov. 29, 1919, shows assets of over 
$36,000,000. 

Reported Lord Northcliffe, famous 
Englishman, to enter picture production. 

W. W. Hodkinson to release series of 
Irvin Willat productions. 



Tuesday, Feb. 3 

Maurice Maeterlinck to write for Gold- 
wyn. 

Goldwyn buys Tabor Grand theater, 
Denver. 

Important film deal believed to be rea- 
son for visit of George King of Stoll Film 
Co., London. 

Wednesday, Feb. 4 

Consolidated Films Laboratory Co., a 
million and a half dollar company, plans 
series of laboratories extending from 
coast to coast. 

Special Pictures Corp. to produce 
comedies. Taken as first serious effort 
of Los Angeles capital to invade picture 
industry. 

Thursday, Feb. 5 

Associated Exhibitors, Inc., will prob- 
ably release 26 pictures a year according 
to General Manager Quimby. 

Hiram Abrams, United Artists, sees 
industry headed for straight percentage. 

Thomas H. Ince coming east where 
important announcement will be made 
regarding Associated Producers. 

Oklahoma managers hold anuual meet- 
ing. Ban "bandit" films. 

D. W. Griffith addresses Virginia leg- 
islative committee on censorship. 
Friday, Feb. 6 

Censorship defeated in Virginia. 

Near blizzard in East hits deliveries of 
films. 

Zukor pledges support of Famous 
Players to Nat'l Board of Review. 

F. A. Gudger, Du Pont official, now 
vice-president of Goldwyn. 

Saturday, Feb. 7 

Famous Players will not release 130 
features promised when season opened. 

San Francisco Chinese societies re- 
fused injunction against "Tong Man." 

41 million in Lux Products Corp., new 
film company. 

Monday, Feb. 9 

North Dakota exhibitors organize. 

P. A. Powers says American pro- 
ducers must sell abroad regardless of 
exchange or foreign producers will step in. 

Eastern producers plan new serial 
combine 

Tuesday, Feb. 10 

Navy wants 20,000 reels. 

Carle E. Carlton receiving bids for 
screen rights to "Irene." 

Black New England Theaters, Inc., ten 
million dollar organization. 

Wednesday, Feb. 11 

South Carolina committee votes down 
proposed censorship bill. 

Mary Pickford to tour world. 

John C. Flinn promoted to executive 
position in Famous Players. 

Thursday, Feb. 12 

Union labor selling stock for Union 
theater in Seattle. 

Mayflower Photoplay interests re- 
ported in New England theater deal. 



81 



JAMES VINCENT 

PRODUCEK 
DIRECTOK 



1465 BROADWAY Telephone 7028 Bryant 



82 



Friday, Feb. 13 

Metro to build studio in East. Also to 
enlarge Coast plant. 

Thomas H. Ince and Marshal Neilan 
making first trip East since formation of 
Associated Producers. 

A. H. Blank, Blank Enterprises, denies 
selling control to Goldwyn, "or anybody." 

Samuel Goldwyn issues statement deny- 
ing Goldwyn, in their theater operations, 
are bucking exhibitors. Says only wants 
a home for his product. 

Saturday, Feb. 14 

Goldwyn to establish organization in 
Australia. 

British Exhibitors Asso. decide to sup- 
port Stoll in controversy over Goldwyn 
contract. 

Monday, Feb. 16 

Charles Miller productions to be re- 
leased through Realart. 

Marshall Neilan's first independent pro- 
duction, "The River's End," given elab- 
orate premiere at Hotel Biltmore. 
Tuesday, Feb. 17 

Adolph Zukor in article published by 
financial paper says that stars' salaries 
are not as enormous as public generally 
understands. 

Ralph Ruffner, well-known exploita- 
tion manager, joins First National. 

Lord Northcliffe, through W. G. 
Faulkner, seeks co-operation between 
Britain and America through films. 

Famous Players booked solid at Capi- 
tol for March. 

Wednesday, Feb. 18 

William Brandt organizing new ex- 
hihitor body in Greater New York. Total 
booking days already reach 500. Vote 
against percentage booking. 

Export and Import Film Co. turns 
from exporting to importing because of 
foreign exchange rate situation. 

Thursday, Feb. 19 

Tom North becomes general manager 
of Tom Moore Enterprises, Washington. 

Frank Crane to write features for Park 
Whiteside productions. 

John Ince signed to direct specials for 
J. Parker Read. 

F. I. L. M. Club of New York urging 
insurance against loss of films upon ex- 
hibitors through reel delivery companies. 
Friday, Feb. 20 

Los Angeles hears Associated Pro- 
ducers will release independently and 
maintain their own exchanges. 

Burton King to make series of pro- 
ductions for Hallmark. 

C. L. Chester plans series of two-reel 
comedies. Production on coast. 

Saturday, Feb. 21 

527 theaters signed in N. Y. State to 
show advertising reels. 

Vivian Martin Pictures, Inc., to star 
Vivian Martin; Edward Bowes, presi- 
dent of organization. 

Monday, Feb. 23 

Reelcraft Pictures Corp. chartered in 



Delaware at $5,000,000. 

Important meeting of directors of As- 
sociated First National Pictures. 

Tuesday, Feb. 24 

Chicago picture theaters threaten to 
close unless operators' union meets de- 
mands of Allied Amusements Association. 

Reported Koplar-Goldman houses in 
St. Louis in deal with Paramount. 

Hart suit, involving $500,000, against 
Thomas H. Ince, under way. 

H. D. H. Connick, Famous Players, on 
coast. May mean changes in coast 
organization. 

Rembusch and Olson mentioned in 
Indiana combine of 50 first run houses. 

W. H. Swanson sells First National 
Denver franchise to Harry T. Nolan. 
Wednesday, Feb. 25 

Two new directors elected and plans 
adopted at meeting of Associated First 
National Pictures. 

Capital Film exchange men meet in 
Chicago. 

A. H. Blank in million dollar deal in 
Des Moines. 

H. B. Wright resigns as manager of 
Northwest Exhibitors Circuit. 

Thursday, Feb. 26 

Frohman Amusement Corp. selling 
stock direct to public. Expect 5,000 
stockholders. 

James V. Bryson to open Universal 
offices in Australia. Pat Powers says 
Universal will build studio in London. 

Sol Lesser takes over distribution of 
Special Pictures Corp. 

Friday, Feb. 27 

Goldwyn directors meet-reported dis- 
cussing plan for distribution of Associated 
Producers product. 

Tom Moore to have 11 houses in Wash- 
ington. 

A. Kaufman signs Allan Holubar and 
Dorothy Phillips. 

Joseph Urban, technical director for 
Cosmopolitan Prod. 

Saturday, Feb. 28 

Allan Dwan discusses Wall Street in 
connection with picture industry. 

Probable legal battle between Univer- 
sal and Al Kaufman regarding Allan 
Holubar and Dorothy Phillips. 

Reported shake-up in Fox organization. 
Monday, Mar. 1 

Charlie Chaplin to make five-reelers 
for "Big 4." 

Henry M. Hobart made vice-president 
of International Film Service Co., Inc. 

First National plan second annual con- 
vention of exchange men. 

Mastbaum circuit of Philadelphia, Na- 
tional Pictures franchise holder. 

Tuesday, Mar. 2 

Reported Famous Players product for 
next year cut to 65. 

Theater owners say United Artists book 
on rental basis. 



83 



JAMES WOODS MORRISON 

Current Releases 
Leads in 

"Love Without Question" with Olive Tell 
"Tomorrow" - All Star Cast 

. "Sowing the Wind" with Anita Stewart 



84 



Wednesday, Mar. 3 

Universal sues Ramus, Inc. and 
Abrams for $100,000. 

Gibraltar Pictures may start series of 
exchanges. 

John D. Tippett of London here. May 
build studio in this country. 

Paramount buys three theaters in San 
Francisco. 

United Artists to release Sennett's 
comedy-feature, "Down on the Farm." 
Thursday, Mar. 4 

New Jersey exhibitor factions divided 
over Sunday opening question. 

Adolph Zukor sailing for England. 
Friday, Mar. 5 

Adolph Zukor issues important state- 
ment before sailing for Europe. 

Producers not worried over exchange 
situation existing between Canada and 
United States. 

J. Parker Read, Jr., expounds his ideas 
on production. 

Saturday, Mar. 6 

Business interests in Omaha and Ne- 
braska turn to film industry for invest- 
ment 

Two $500,000 damage suits filed against 
Hodkinson, Collins and others. 

Monday, Mar. 8 

Second annual convention of Select to 
start April 5. 

Annual meeting of New York State Ex- 
hibitors' League opens in Utica. 

Tuesday, Mar. 9 

International combine reported in mak- 
ing in which Adolph Zukor plays big parr. 

S. Rowson says English production in- 
creasing at rapid rate. 

William A. Brady Pictures Corp. form- 
ed. Travers Vale director general. 

Convention of M. P. E. A. to be held 
in Chicago instead of Virginia. 

Wednesday, Mar. 10 

Stock being offered in Boston in con- 
cern known as National Finance and Film 
Trust. 

Tarkington Baker leaves Universal to 
form own organization. 

Thursday, Mar. 11 

James Calnay of Cinema Ad, Inc., of 
Los Angeles, claims he has contracts 
with producers for insertion of advertis- 
ing in films. 

Selznick organization combining vari- 
ous companies throughout country, will 
save approximately $800,000 a year. 
Friday, Mar. 12 

Isaac Wolper, Mayflower, denies deal 
with F. C. Quimby, of Associated Exhib- 
itors. 

Reelcraft Pictures Corp. absorbs num- 
ber of state rights short reel companies. 
Saturday, Mar. 13 

David P .Howells sees danger in action 
of importers turning to other phases of 
the domestic industry. 

No census for the picture industry in 
1920 figures. 

Carl Laemmle and Robert H. Cochrane 



to buy out P. A. Fowers' interest in Uni- 
versal. 

Monday, Mar. 15 

Robertson-Cole field force and home 
officials hold convention at Astor. 

Broadwell Pictures. Inc., organized in 
Massachusetts. To produce. 

Thomas H. Ince and J. Parker Read, 
Jr., of Associated Producers, leave for 
coast without announcing distribution 
plans. 

Robertson-Cole to produce "Kismet" 
with Otis Skinner. 

Tuesday, Mar. 16 

Star Co. suing Vitagraph and Pathe 
relative to "Get Rich Quick Wallingford" 
productions. 

Associated First National to release se- 
ries made by Whitman Bennett starring 
Lionel Barry more. 

Ethel Barrymore signed by Tri-Star 
Pictures Corp. to produce specials. 
Wednesday, Mar. 17 

Percentage on gross with no deduc- 
tions, reported selling plan for Famous 
next year. 

Select to distribute Prizma. Will make 
features. 

Educational gets world-wide distribu- 
tion rights on C. L. Chester product. 
Thursday, Mar. 18 

Merger expected in United Picture 
Theaters. 

Percentage basis outlook for Fall. 

Exporters disagree on status of for- 
eign market. 

Friday, Mar. 19 

Marshall Neilan to make productions 
in Europe. 

Loew to build four big houses in Cali- 
fornia. 

Thomas H. Ince and J. Parker Read, 
Jr., in Los Angeles to confer with Asso- 
ciated Producers' members regarding dis- 
tribution. 

Saturday, Mar. 20 

Cathrine Curtis Film Corp. expands. 

Ethel Clayton to form own producing 
company for independent distribution. 

James Oliver Curwood plans legal ac- 
tion against producers who "pad" old 
films. 

Monday, Mar. 22 

Universal planning expansion of pub- 
licity force. 

Woman's City Club adopts resolution 
in opposition to legal censorship. 

Tuesday, Mar. 23 

Robertson-Cole to release 40 for 1920- 
21 instead of 60. 

J. A. Quinn forms Motion Picture and 
Theatrical League for Better Pictures. 

Georges Carpentier, French pugilist, ar- 
rives to start production for Robertson- 
Cole. 

Wednesday, Mar. 24 

National Picture Theater directors due 
here in April for convention. 

Hy-Art Pictures Co. signs Lillian 
Walker and Ruby de Renter. 



85 



WYNDHAM STANDING 

Who will be seen in the special super-feature 

"EARTHBOUND" 

A Featured Broadway Run — Astor Theater 



86 



Important meeting of Goldwyn sales 
managers. 

Thursday, Mar. 25 

Crusader Films Corp. plan series of his- 
torical pictures. 

Skouras Bros, of St. Louis secure First 
National franchise for Missouri. 

Producer-exchangemen combine ex- 
pected in Chicago. 

Haworth claims Hayakawa's services 
for four years. Latter says he is through. 

Federal Trade Commission resumes 
Saenger Co. investigation at New Or- 
leans. 

Friday, Mar. 26 

Independent Producers plan own or- 
ganization at Chicago convention. 

Purity Pictures Corp. organizing for 
production of religious pictures exclusive- 

ly. 

Saturday, Mar. 27 

Federal Trade Commission's investiga- 
tion into activities of Saenger Amuse- 
ment Co. 

Broadwell Prod., Inc., acquire rights to 
Nick Carter stories which they will pro- 
duce. 

Robertson-Cole to build ten-story office 
building on Seventh Ave. 

Monday, Mar. 29 

Chicago independent exchange men 
form organization known as Federated 
Film Exchanges of America, Inc. 

Members of Exhibitors' Defence Com- 
mittee of First National here for confer- 
ence. 

Tuesday, Mar. 30 

Kansas Exhibitors' Associat'on adopt 
resolutions opposing percentage. 

Richard Rowland issues statem~.it - 
garding Loew-Metro organization for 
coming year. 

Selznick signs William Faversham for 
series of productions. 

Amalgamated Exhibitors, Ltd., Mon- 
treal, secure Hallmark and P'o icer fran- 
chises. 

Wednesday, Mar. 31 

Exhibitors' Defence Comm'tt e of 
First National talk over distribut'on of 
Associated Producers. Plan annual con- 
vention, Congress Hotel, Chicago, begin- 
ning April 26. 

Independent Producers open two-day 
session at Hotel Knickerbocker, N. Y. 

Hiram Abrams leaves for coast. M's- 
sion is secret. 

Thursday, Apr. 1 

William G. McAdoo retires as counsel 
for United Artists. Oscar A. Price may 
resign. 

Famous Players signs Ethel Clayton. 

Independent Producers meet in New 
York. Plan cooperative organization. 
Friday, Apr. 2 

Mark Klaw forms film producing un't. 
Long expected as factor in field. 

Interchurch Film Corp. offers unit pro- 
gram to churches. After non-theatr'cal 
distribution exclusively. 



Saturday, Apr. 3 

Ben Wilson to produce serials for Selz- 
nick. 

Mac Murray leaves International to 
make independent productions directed by 
Robert Leonard. 

Selznick has 200 plays to be produced 
by various units. 

Monday, Apr. 5 

Texas exhibitors suing for share of 
Chaplin picture profits. 

Oscar A. Price, president of United 
Artists, resigns. 

Selznick, Select and Republic branch 
managers open convention at Astor. 
Tuesday, Apr. 6 

First National discovers after extensive 
investigation that 25c is average admis- 
sion price in country's larger theaters. 

Hiram Abrams may succeed Oscar A. 
Price as president of United Artists. 

Triangle again secures its exchanges 
and films from United Picture Theaters. 
Wednesday, Apr. 7 

Harry M. Crandall, Washington, suc- 
ceeds Messmore Kendall as president of 
Associated Exhibitors, Inc. 

Fred B. Warren resigns as vice-presi- 
dent of W. W. Hodkinson Corp. 

Bryant Washburn will leave Famous 
Players. May go to First National. 

Lewis J. Selznick signs William Collier 
and Louise Huff. W'alturdaw Ltd. will 
distribute in England. 

Geraldine Farrar reported signed by 
Associated Exhibitors, Inc. 

Thursday, Apr. 8 

National Picture Theaters hold meet- 
ing. Will elect directors. 

Arthur James resigns as director of 
publicity for Fox. 

Universal to revert to the star series 
system of booking. 

Friday, Apr. 9 

Adolph Zukor reported perfecting com- 
bine in England with Sir William Jury 
and Lord Beaverbrook. 

Fairbanks discusses stock holdings of 
var'ous members of United Artists in 
company. 

New York exhibitors seek law to kill 
deposit system. 

Saturday, Apr. 10 

D. XV. Griffith secures exclusive patent 
rights to "blue effect" used in "Broken 
Blossoms." 

Monday, Apr. 12 

Wil'ard C. Patterson of Atlanta prom- 
ises a show down with producer-exhib- 
itors who he says are trying to drive in- 
dependent exhibitors out of business. 

Universal signs French and German 
authors to write original stories. 

Hayakawa Feature Film Co. formed. 
Tuesday, Apr. 13 
Theater Owners Chamber of Commerce 
back of New York State Exhibitors' 
League in fight for removal of deposits. 

Works of Max Reinhardt to be filmed 
in California. 



87 




JOHN LYNCH 

Head of Scenario Department — Selznirk Pictures 



88 



Wednesday, Apr. 14 

Famous Players' annual report shows 
big increase over 1918. Total business 
over $27,000,000. 

Goldwyn to produce 52 next year. 

Nazimova renews contract with Metro. 

Scandinavian representative of David 
Howells sees growth of German films. 
Thursday, Apr. 15 

Associated Motion Picture Advertisers 
perfect scheme for closer cooperation be- 
tween film companies and newspapers. 

Isaac Wolper out of Mayflower. To 
produce independently. 

Theater Owners' Chamber of Com- 
merce objects to use of Loew's name on 
Metro productions. 

Murray W. Garsson forms new com- 
pany known as Fine Arts Pictures, Inc., 
to produce features. 

Friday, Apr. 16 

Motion Picture Exhibitors of America 
to meet in Chicago in June. 

German Reichstag plans to stimulate 
home production and bar out all but their 
own films. 

Reelcraft rounds out distributing sys- 
tem. Has 30 exchanges. 

Saturday, Apr. 17 

First National has plan to determine 
actual box office strength of hitherto un- 
determined pictures. 

Marguerite Clark through with Fa- 
mous. Considering offers. 

Members of "Big 4" deny - dissolution. 

Pathe annual statement shows increase 
of 60 per cent in gross earnings. 

Holdings of P. A. Powers in Universal 
passes to Carl Laemmle and R. H. Coch- 
ran. 

British Columbia bill would tax 20 per 
cent of gross receipts on all amusements. 
Monday, Apr. 19 

Selznick Enterprises plan 537 produc- 
tions for coming season. 

Madlaine Traverse through with Fox. 

Several hundred exhibitors to work 
with "Pat" Patterson on Exhibitors' De- 
fense League. 

Tuesday, Apr. 20 

Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks 
to sail for Europe May 12. 

Loew takes over four David Picker 
theaters in New York City. 

Reported Louis Bennison signed by 
Marc Klaw. 

Wednesday, Apr. 21 

Pauline Frederick joins Robertson - 
Cole. Leaves Goldwyn. 

Two large picture producing corpora- 
tions organized in Japan. 

C. C. Burr sells 12 "Torchy" come- 
dies to Educational. 

Thursday, Apr. 22 

Adolph Zukor returns from Europe. 

Goldwyn secures "Return of Tarzan" 
from Numa Pictures Corp. 

Two Spanish companies combine to 
control production and exhibition. 

Nebraska exibitor sues Omaha Film 



Board of Trade for $750,000. Charges re- 
straint of trade. 

Friday, Apr. 23 

Celebrated Authors Society buys Ed- 
ward E. Rose plays. 

First National members all set for Chi- 
cago convention. 

Saturday, Apr. 22 

Harry Levey, Universal Industrial, 
holds no contract with exhibitor organiza- 
tion. Claims a misunderstanding. 

First National Convention in Chicago 
opens. 

Clarine Seymour, Griffith player, dead. 
Monday, Apr. 24 

Shake-up reported in auditing depart- 
ment of Famous Players. Fifteen report- 
ed out. 

Independent exhibitors in Chicago form 
new organization. 

First National gets from Mayflower Al- 
lan Dwan productions and those of R. A. 
Walsh and Sidney Franklin. 

Petition in bankruptcy filed against 
United Picture Theaters of America, Inc. 

Gladys Brockwell leaves Fox. 
Tuesday, Apr. 25 

Associated Producers, Inc. ("Bix Six") 
form their own distribution with Oscar 
A. Price, formerly of United Artists, as 
president, and F. B. Warren, formerly of 
Goldwyn and Hodkinson, as general man- 
ager. Will deal direct with exhibitors. 

Frank Hall takes over Triangle ex- 
changes and films. 

United Artists' meeting results in elec- 
tion of D. F. O'Brien, vice-president, and 
A. T. Banzhaf, secretary. No president 
named. 

Signal Amusement Co., Atlanta, gets 
Associated Exhibitors' franchise in the 
South. 

Wednesday, Apr. 26 

Petition in bankruptcy filed against 
United Pictures Productions Corp. 

First National to distribute two five- 
reel Mack Sennett comedies. 

Exhibitors in Chicago name new or- 
ganization, Independent Exhibitors of 
America. 

Thursday, Apr. 27 

Hugo Ballin forms own producing com- 
pany. 

First National convention in Chicago 
closes. 

M. P. E. A., Inc., after information 
regarding operations of film clubs for the 
Department of Justice. 

B. P. Schulberg, president of Attrac- 
tions Distributing Corp. 

Friday, Apr. 28 

First National to put new sub-franchis- 
ing plan into operation at once. 

Educational secures distribution of se- 
ries to be produced by Conservation Com- 
mission of New York State. 

Saturday, May 1 

First National sub-franchises expected 
to reach 6,000 by fall. 



89 



HARRY 


BEAUMONT m. p. d. a. 




DIRECTED 


"STOP THIEF" 


"OFFICER 666" ' GOING SOME' 


"LORD AND LADY 


ALGY" "1 HE GREAT ACCIDENT" 




FOR GOLDWYN 


90 



More Loew theaters planned tor Can- 
ada and West. 

Famous Players plan to experiment on 
re-issuing on regular schedule. 

Monday, May 3 

Sol Lesser to concentrate on exhibiting. 

Southern California exhibitors demand 
removal of United Artists' Los Angeles 
manager. 

Tuesday, May 4 

Famous Players form $3,000,000 cor- 
poration to produce in India. 

No French embargo on films. 

Screen Plays Productions. $11,000,000 
corporation, formed in Delaware. 

Brunton to build studio in East. 

National Association reports decrease 
in film thefts. 

Wednesday, May 5 

Crandall denies he has sold his Wash- 
ington theaters to Goldwyn. 

Claire Whitney second Tri-Star Pic- 
tures star. 

Bill suggested to increase theater tax. 
Thursday, May 6 

Committee of Independent Exhibitors 
of America in conference with producers 
on theater-buying rmest'on. 

5,000 film users listed in churches and 
institutions by Government. 

Friday, May 7 

Ralph Proctor resigns as assistant gen- 
eral manager of United Artists. 

Reported John Emerson will make se- 
ries of specials under h's own direction. 
Saturday, May 8 

Tax on personals demanded from art- 
ists by Government. West coast film 
colony aroused. 

Cecil B. De Mille renews with Famous 
Players for five years. 

No intention of owning or operating 
theaters, says Associated Producers. 
Tuesday, May 10 

Goldwyn not after theaters. Will buy 
or build when forced to only, says Godsol. 

More production voted for at meet- 
ing of Canadian Photoplays. 

Frohman Amusement Co. expansion 
calls for immediate production of 16 pic- 
tures. 

First National officials in Dallas to 
combat Hulsey-Lynch Enterprises. 

Gloria Swanson to be starred in Para- 
mount Pictures. 

More First National units formed in 
Delaware. 

Wednesday, May 11 

David P. Howells and Arthur S. Kane 
elected to board of directors of Catherine 
Curtis Corp. 

Split in industry expected at Cleveland 
Convention over theater buying activities 
by producers. 

Ralph O. Proctor joins Associated Ex- 
hibitors as assistant to Fred C. Quimbv. 
Thursday, May 12 

Associated Producers will have ex- 
changes ready by September. Will wage 
campaigns for long runs. 



J. N. Naulty, general manager Eastern 
studios of Famous Players, resigns to 
form producing unit with Gardiner Hunt- 
ing. 

Los Angeles reports formation of $5,- 
000,000 Oliver Morosco picture company. 
Friday, May 13 

"Big Four" members due in New York 
in a month to hold meeting for election 
of president. Pickford-Fairbanks foreign 
trip postponed. 

Reported B. S. Moss sells theaters to 
prominent vaudeville interests. 

Enid Bennett and Fred Niblo to leave 
Thomas H. I nee and form two distinct 
producing units. 

Saturday, May 14 

King Vidor to make four productions 
only during coming year. 

Georges Carpentier signed by Robert- 
son-Cole for three years. 

Texas- Arkansas -Oklahoma exhibitors 
to build new houses. Assured of product 
from First National. Causes break with 
Hulsey. 

Saturday, May 15 

Goldwyn in Capitol. "Roxey" expect- 
ed to be in charge. 

Samuel Goldwyn returns from Europe, 
forms Urban Motion Picture Industries. 

Associated Producers chartered in Del- 
aware. 

Realart holding convention in New 
York. 

Monday, May 17 

Fran 1 : Rembusch suggests independent 
exh-'b'tors cancel service on producers 
who own theaters. 

Educational to build studio in Holly- 
wood 

Joseph L. FHnkett back from England. 

Federated Film Exchanges of America 
plan four day convention at Astor, New 
York City. 

Tuesday, May 18 

Samuel Goldwyn thinks foreign field 
offers tremendous opportunity. Has 22 
productions ready for Fall season. 

Associated Producers secure offices in 
several .West Coast cities. 

David P. Howells, exporter, assumes 
cortrol of J. Frank Brockliss, Inc. 

Southern Baptists convention drops at- 
tack prepared against pictures and Na- 
tional Board of Review. 

Wednesday, May 19 

George Loane Tucker-Mayflower Pho- 
toplay Corp. litigation may be settled out 
of court. Tucker to make four more for 
Mayflower. 

David W. Griffith finishes contract with 
First National. Buys back "Black Beach" 
for United Artists release. 

Various Greater New York circuits re- 
ported perfecting booking combine against 
Marcus Loew. 

Thursday, May 20 

Lillian Gish, long a Griffith player, sign- 
ed by Frohman Amusement Corp. for 
three years. 



91 



EARLE WILLIAMS 

VITAGRAPH STAR 

Latest Release: THE PURPLE CIPHER 

Recent Releases: A MASTER STROKE 
CAPT. SWIFT 
THE FORTUNE HUNTER 

Box Office Attractions of Merit 



92 



Drastic attacks on industry imposed in 
province of Ontario. 

Friday, May 21 

Famous Players claims contract with 
Gloria Swanson for over two years. Lat- 
ter denies this. 

J. G. Hawks, C. Gardner Sullivan, 
Monte Katterjohn and John Lynch re- 
ported forming producing company. 

Christie comedies to be released through 
Educational. 

Robert Harron Prod, through Metro 
next season. Richard Barthelmess pro- 
ductions also to be released in Fall. 
Saturday, May 22 

Big foreign plans of Educational in- 
clude probably largest theater in world 
for London. 

Dr. Ellis P. Oberholtzer, secretary of 
Pennsylvania State Board of Censors, re- 
ported out. 

Exhibitors' Protective League and The- 
atrical Protective League of Minneapolis 
combine. • 

American Cinema reorganization will 
include important development with of- 
fices abroad. 

Official opening of Fox studio. 
Monday, May 24 

Plans reorganization of United Picture 
Theaters of America. 

Selznick's talk to Theater Owners' 
Chamber of Commerce expected to favor 
new life for Nat'l Assn. 

Tuesday, May 25 
Associated Exhibitors, Inc., to be rep- 
resented in Cleveland during convention 
week. 

Capt. E. McL. Bayne, head of Kino- 
grams, president of new Associated 
Screen News. 

Richards and Flynn, Kansas exhibitors, 
to produce series starring Jack Gardner. 

Federated Film Exchanges of America 
probably will become permanent body. 
Wednesday, May 26 

Reported contracts signed between 
Messmore Kendall, C. Gardner Sullivan 
and Isaac Wolper for series of C. Gardner 
Sullivan productions. 

S. L. Rothapfel manager of Capitol 
Theater. 

Bebe Daniels fifth Realart star. 

Ida May Park Productions formed. 

Deposit bill signed at Albany. 
Thursday, May 27 

Winfield R. Sheehan and Saul E. Rog- 
ers elected vice-presidents of Fox Film 
Corp. 

Invincible Photoplays, Inc., offering 
stock for sale. 

Famous Players' quarterly report shows 
$101,760 over 1919. 

Friday, May 28 

Maurice Tourneur working on last pro- 
duction for Famous Players. 

Metro announces approximately 60 
productions for next season at banquet 
which closes convention. 



Saturday, May 29 

Frank Rembusch of Indianapolis would 
merge all exhibitor factions into one na- 
tional organization. 

First National 1920-21 schedule includes 
three from Allen Holubar. 

Gaumont pledges $1,000 to charity if 
competitor has better color pictures than 
his. 

Tuesday, June 1 

Next year's schedule announced by First 
National plan 60 productions, from IS pro- 
ducing units. 

30 productions from Associated Pro- 
ducers first year. 

Metro signs eight prominent authors. 
Wednesday, June 2 

Robertson-Cole to build studio in Cali- 
fornia. 

Joseph L. Plunkett to again assume 
management of Strand. 

Famous Players Plan 104 for next year. 
Thursday, June 3 

Move under way to hold one conven- 
tion of exhibitors in Cleveland. Com- 
mittee of Seventeen at work. 

Natl. Booking plan effected. If com- 
pletely developed would establish unusual 
conditions from production to distribu- 
tion. 

Friday, June 4 

Allen Theatrical Enterprises of Canada 
announce plans for theater building in 
Europe. Secure site for two theaters in 
London, England. 

Plans under way to circuit prologues in 
First National houses throughout the 
country. 

Committee representing Motion Picture 
Theater Owners of America and Inde- 
pendent Motion Picture Exhibitors to 
meet in Cleveland Monday. Indications 
point to one convention. 

C. R. Seeley leaves National Pictures 
Theaters. 

Capitol re-opens with typical Rothapfel 
program. 

Saturday, June 5 

H. M. Thomas leaves Rialto, Omaha, 
to direct theaters of Famous Players- 
Canadian corporation. 

Motion picture executives and exhibitors 
from all sections of the country gather in 
Cleveland for National Association meet- 
; ng and exhibitor convention. 

Monday, June 7 

Messmore Kendall affiliated with Rob- 
ert W. Chambers in new picture com- 
pany. Isaac Wolper believed interested. 

Oscar A. Price and Fred B. Warren of 
Associated Producers return to New York 
from California. 

Selznick Enterprises acquire Paragon 
studios, Fort Lee. Now the largest pro- 
ducer in the East. 

Edgar Lewis to make series of specials 
for Pathe. 

Tuesday, June 8 

National Association meets in Cleve- 
land. W. A. Brady refuses to run for 



president. Election scheduled for Fall. 

Sydney Cohen opens exhibitor conven- 
tion in Cleveland. 

Wednesday, June 9 

Hiram Abrams elected president of 
United Artists. 

Independent M. P. Exhibitors of Ameri- 
ca and M. P. Theater Owners of Ameri- 
ca form one association in Cleveland. M. 
P. Exhibitors of America, Inc. — the A. S. 
Black League — withdraws. 

Mayflower to specialize on big produc- 
tions for next season. Will not feature 
director. 

Metro acquires "The Great Redeemer," 
a Tourneur production. 

Thursday, June 10 

Sydney Cohen elected president of com- 
bined exhibitor organizations. A. S. 
Black calls M. P. E. A. convention in 
New York for July 28, 29. 

Harry Koplar to start action for re- 
covery of ten St. Louis theaters from 
Famous Players. 

Friday, June 11 

Madge Kennedy Pictures Corp., formed. 
Star plans four a year. 

Coast producers form new organization 
to buy material and props collectively. 
Saturday, June 12 

Indications point to the entrance of 
organized labor in the producing and ex- 
hibiting fields. This to secure labor's ver- 
sion of industrial problems. 

Official Government returns show total 
rental business done by distributors 
reaches $62,520,167.20 from July 1, 1919, 
to March. 31, 1920. 

Herman Rifkin's exchange men's organ- 
ization to handle 16 pictures a year. 
Monday, June 14 

Eastman Kodak will build warehouses 
in Los Angeles with capacity of 10,000,000 
feet of raw stock. 

Representatives of important English 
interests in America to line up stars and 
technical men. Madlaine Traverse may 
be first. 

Resolutions adopted by exhibitors in 
Cleveland indicate drives will be started 
for new distributing contracts and curtail- 
ment of F. I. L. M. club activities. 
Tuesday, June 15 

Alliance Film Corp., Ltd., of London 
makes offer to President Wilson to write 
series of stories dealing with international 
peace. 

Another combination of independent 
exchangemen under way. 

Harry A. Sherman plans new franchise 
scheme. Will also make 12 pictures a 
year. 

Joe Brandt resigns as director general 
of National Film. 

First National will probably handle ser- 
ies of Carter De Haven comedies. 

Frank A. Garbutt heads Cinema Mer- 
cantile Corp., the new co-operative buying 
organizat'on of coast producers. 



Wednesday, June 16 

Total rentals for first quarter of 1920 
reach $25,495,133. 

Industry threatened with strike of lab- 
oratory men. New demands presented 
by workers' union. 

Two Famous Players' dividends to fall 
due in July and August. 

Central Pennsylvania exhibitors form 
organization. 

Thursday, June 17 

Siberian Government in market for 
large quantity of films and projection 
machines. 

Bryant Washburn forms own company. 
Lee A. Ochs interested. 

Louis B. Mayer to produce 12 pictures 
during next season. 

Friday, June 18 

Eastern Laboratory Owners reject de- 
mands of Motion Picture Craftsmen. 

Summer Charles Britton, publisher, 
forms producing company. 

Germany fixes limit on importation of 
foreign films. 

Saturday, June 19 

Harold Llod expected to make five reel 
features for Associated Exhibitors. 

Labor Film Service, Inc., plans regular 
release of entertainment and propaganda 
subjects. 

Monday, June 21 

Vivian Moses, supervisor of publicity 
and advertising for Fox Film. 

Joseph M. Schenck is partner with Al- 
bert Kaufman in Allan Holubar and Sid- 
ney Franklin productions. 

Southwestern exhibitors finally close 
for Associated First National franchise 
in Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma. Plan 
determined fight against E. H. Hulsey. 

Tuesday, June 22 

Edward Bowes, managing director Cap- 
itol Theater, now heads theater division 
for Goldwyn Pictures. 

Germany again clamps down strict em- 
bargo on importation of foreign made 
films. 

Wednesday, June 23 

International Exhibitors Circuit, Inc., in 
process of formation. Plan to take over 
assets of United Picture Theaters and 
United Picture Productions Corp. Will 
operate along First National lines. 

Harry Levey, manager Industrial and 
Educational Departments at Universal, re- 
signs. 

American Theaters Corp., $5,000,000 
company with headquarters in Atlanta, 
plans to develop string of southern the- 
aters. 

Thursdav June 24 

Associated Producers will operate 1? 
exchanges. All but three managers al- 
r.eady appointed. 

Samuel Goldwyn in coast interview 
states his company will release 60 pro- 
ductions for 1920-21. Goldwyn may have 
several European stars. 



95 



S. A. Lynch Enterprises Finance Corp. 
formed in Delaware with $10,000,000 cap- 
ital. 

Harry Levey will produce industrials 
independent!}'. May have his own dis- 
tributing organization. 

Friday, June 25 

Tom Mix to form own company on 
completion of Fox contract, is report. 

Saturday, June 26 

Associated First National states sub- 
franchises numbering 2,500 . have been 
granted. 

A. F. of L. adopt resolution condem- 
ning present films in which labor prob- 
lems are shown. 

Monday, June 28 

First National plans a presidential straw 
vote in all of its theaters. Four million 
voters expected to be reached. 

Tuesday, June 29 

Loew's, Inc., declares two dividends, 
5% on common and 1^4% on preferred. 

Harry Morey to produce independently. 

Joe Brandt planning new distributing 
organization. 

Famous Players sign James Barrie, 
Henry Arthur Jones, Justin McCarthy, 
Edward Knoblock, Arnold Bennett and 
H. G. Wells to write original stories for 
the screen. 

Wednesday, June 30 

Realart will release 40 next year. Jus- 
tine Johnston new star; four William Des- 
mond Taylor productions listed. 

David P. Howells forms new unit to 
concentrate sales in Southern Europe and 
Egypt. 

Emile Chautard severs connections with 
William Fox. 

Universal declares 1/4% dividend. 
Thursday, July 1 

David W. Griffith, Inc., a $50,000,000 
corporation, formed. New York and Chi- 
cago bankers interested. 500,000 shares 
of stock for public offering. 

Robertson-Cole to release 36 for 1920- 
21. 

Pathe to handle 4 Federal Photoplays 
yearly and probably series of Robert 
Brunton features. Also 8 serials for new 
year. 

Friday, July 2 

Fannie Hurst to write original stories 
for Universal. 

Saturday, July 3 

Sydney S. Cohen, president M. P. T. O. 
of America, in open letter to Adolph 
Zukor attacks theater operations of 
Famous Players and calls Zukor the ex- 
hibitors' "most dangerous enemy." 
Tuesday, July 6 

Goldwyn to release 1920-1921 product 
on open booking plan. 

Allen Theatrical Enterprises, Canada, 
enroll in new First National franchise 
plan. 

Louise Lovely to be a Fox star. 



Wednesday, July 7 

Dominion Films to make six Ralph 
Connor stories. First National may re- 
lease. 

Thursday, July 8 

Important booking combination being 
perfected in the Northwest. Jensen and 
Von Herberg interested. 

Independent exchangemen headed by 
Herman Fifkin, Boston, discussing for- 
mation of new national organization in 
Chicago. Ivan Abramson seeking pro- 
duction contract. 

Officials of National Booking Corp. 
convene in Atlantic City for important 
conference. Jules Mastbaum, Stanley Co., 
expected to attend. 

Greater New York exhibitors to pro- 
test return of deposit checks on Charles 
Ray productions by First National. Claim 
original contracts are valid. 

Watterson Rothacker sails for London 
to establish laboratory there. 

Friday, July 9 

Northwest exhibitors form Independent 
Exhibitors' Circuit through which 123 the- 
aters will be booked. 

Gladys Walton and Eva Novak new 
Universal stars. 

Saturday, July 10 

Epidemic of booking combines spread- 
ing throughout the country. Lynch work- 
ing in South. Jensen and Von Berberg in 
Northwest. Many distributors say they 
won't book through combines. 

Monday, July 12 

Jack Pickford released from Goldwyn 
contract. Will form his own company. 

Jules Mastbaum, president of National 
Booking Corp. Some First National 
franchise holders interested in plan. 
Tuesday, July 13 

D. W. Griffith, Inc., offering 125,000 
shares of stock at $15 per share. Issue 
listed on curb market. 

Wednesday, July 14 

Oliver Morosco Productions, Inc., 
formed with $2,500,000 capital. Will film 
stage producers' plays. 

M. P. Exhibitors of America, Inc., to 
meet Aug. 31-Sept. 1, at Hotel Congress, 
Chicago. 

Thursday, July 15 

Texas Exhibitors Assn. formed in Dal- 
las. To be affiliated as booking circuit 
with exhibitors in Texas. 

Sydney Cohen writes D. W. Griffith 
complaining of "hostile and arrogant" at- 
titude of Hiram Abrams toward ex- 
hibitors. 

W. E. Shallenberg appointed general 
manager of Federated Film Exchanges of 
America, Inc. 

Athur Donaldson Productions formed. 
Friday, July 16 

Stoll of England may establish ex- 
change system throughout the United 
States. 





FOR CONSTANCE TALMADGE: 
"A Temperamental Wife," "The Virtuous Vamp," "The Love 
Expert," "In Search of a Sinner" and "The Perfact Woman" 



FOR PARAMOUNT-ARTCRAFT: 
"Come On In" and "Oh, You Women" 



FOR NORMA TALMADGE: 
"The Social Secretary" 



FOR DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS: 
"Reaching for the Moon," "The Americano," "Down to 
Earth," "His Picture in the Papers," "Wild and 
Woolly," "In Again — Out Again" 



Address 
130 WEST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



Saturday, July 17 

International Alliance of Theatrical 
Stage Employees and M. P. Operators 
of U. S. and Canada threaten strike if de- 
mands are not met. 

Ralph Proctor resigns from Associated 
Exhibitors. 

Monday July 19 

A. J. Callaghan reported to have signed 
George Arliss to appear in "The Devil" 
for First National release. 

Laboratory workers around New York 
go on strike. 

James M. Barrie to come to America in 
the Fall to assist in making "Peter Pan" 
for Famous. 

Tuesday, July 20 

Reggie Morris new director general of 
Special Pictures Corp. 

Theater circuit for India under way. 

New deal on for distribution of Tri- 
angle re-issues and Hallmark productions. 
Wednesday, July 21 

Holding company being formed for 
Selzmck company. 

Thursday, July 22 

First National to open own offices in 
Eastern Canada, displacing Regal. 

Adolph Zukor wants to know person- 
ally about reported threats by Famous' ' 
employees to exhibitors. 

Friday, July 23 

Production halts due to large number 
of pictures made ahead of schedule and 
other causes. 

Saturday, July 24 

McAdoo stock in United Artists pur- 
chased by stars making up the corpora- 
tion. v 

Kessel & Baumann secure "Babe" Ruth 
teature. 

Monday, July 26 

Fine Arts Film Corp. file $500,000 suit 
against Equity regarding C. K. Young 
productions. 

. T. H. Ince charges Judge Works, hear- 
ing Hart case, with bias. 

Tuesday, July 27 

New York Chamber of Commerce The- 
ater Owners want open booking and will 
so operate. 

Wednesday, July 28 

Sydney S. Cohen of M. P. T. O wa'its 
conference of exhibitors and producer- 
exhibitors regarding standard form of 
contract. 

Thursday, July 29 

Franco-American Cinematograph Co 
announce plan. Claim to control 20,000 
theaters and many companies. 

S A. Lynch said to be arranging with 
producers for product for new booking 
idea. b 

A. M. P. A. nominate officers for com- 
ing year. Paul Lazarus to be president. 



Friday, July 30 

Brunton has Dustin Farnum, Ruth Ro- 
land and Chas. Hutchinson under con- 
tract. 

United Artists' foreign deal closed — B. 
P. Shulberg brings suit against Hiram 
Abrams for commission regarding deal. 
Saturday, July 31 

Laboratory strike ends. Joint commit- 
tee to arrange wage scale. 

Monday, Aug. 2 

Loew's, Inc., to offer 288,000 shares of 
stock at $22. New finances to be invest- 
ed in theaters. 

Paul H. Cromelin, president of Inter- 
O cean, hits combinations in the film in- 
dustry. 

Prominent producers and distributors, 
all members of N. A. M. P. I., go on rec- 
ord as opposing booking agencies. 
Tuesday, Aug. 3 

O riner Locklear, producing for Fox, 
killed in aeroplane accident at Los An- 
geles. 

Special Pictures Corp. signs Chester 
Conklin for comedy series. 

Wednesday, Aug. 4 
International Exhibition, first since the 
Great War, to open in Amsterdam, Hol- 
land, Aug. 12. 

Tom Moore disposes of Associated 1st 
National franchise for District of Colum- 
bia to the circuit. 

Bessie Barriscale completes contract 
with B. B. Features, Inc. 

Frances Marion to direct Marv Pick- 
ford in two pictures. 

S. A. Lynch acquires theater chains in 
Wichita Falls, Little Rock and El Paso. 
Thursday, Aug. 5 
Adolph Zukor agrees to meet committee 
of exhibitors to go over Famous Players' 
theater policy. 

Annette Kellerman forms new produc- 
ing company. 

Friday, Aug. 6 

W. H. Swanson, First National fran- 
chise holder in Salt Lake City, to enter 
producing field. 

Saturday, Aug. 7 

Harry Crandall. Washington, purchases 
Associated First National franchises for- 
merly held by Tom Moore. 

Monday, Aug. 9 

B. P. Schulberg and "Bernie" Fineman 
buy Sam Rork's interest in Katherin- 
MacDonald Co. 

Theater Owners' Chamber of Com- 
merce seeking opinion as to legality of 
Famous Players' booking contract. 

Harry Garson secures receiver for 
Equity Pictures, but court later vacates 
order. 

Tuesday, Aug. 10 

Allied Independent Attractions, Inc. 
formed by Ralph Proctor to supply ser- 
vice to independent producers. 

Other producer-exhibitors in addition 
to Famous Players may be asked to meet 



99 



ENID 
BENNETT 



FRED 
NIBLO 



100 



the exhibitors' Committee of 9 on the 
theater holding question. 

Asso. Prod.'s first release, "Homespun 
Folks," Ince supervised. 

Wednesday, Aug. 11 

F. J. Harrison, former chemist for P. 
A. Powers, seeks inquiry into affairs of 
Powers Film Prod. Co. 

Reelcraft Pictures offer $800,000 stock 
to public. 

Thursday, Aug. 12 

Famous Players' criticism of First Na- 
tional sub-franchise plan answered in de- 
tail by the latter. 

Dorothy Gish completes Famous Play- 
ers' contract. 

Harry Koplar settles controversy over 
St. Louis theaters with Famous Players 
for reported sum of $570,000. 

Nazimova to make two more for Metro 
under present contract. May renew 
Metro contract. 

Federal Government recovers $213,133 
in delinquent theater admission taxes. 
Friday, Aug. 13 

Balaban & Katz buy Illinois First Nat 1 
franchise from Ascher Bros. 

Censorship killed in Georgia. 

Exhibitors' Committee of 9 to investi- 
gate connections of Lynch and Black with 
Famous. 

Involuntary petition of bankruptcy filed 
against Hallmark Pictures Corp. 

Saturday, Aug. 14 

Booking combine question a serious 
•one to warrant investigation by Federal 
Trade Commission. 

First National forms two subsidiary 
companies to handle Canadian distribu- 
tion. W. J. Drummond, general manager. 
Monday, Aug. 16 

Tom Moore says National Booking idea 
caused him to break with First National 
Tuesday, Aug. 17 

Regal Films and Exhibitors Distribut- 
ing Corp. merge interests in Canada. 
Gives Regan Robertson-Cole product. 

Committee of 9 investigating S. A. 
Lynch's activities in South. 

Wednesday, Aug. 18 

International Theater Corp. formed. 
Alter chain of houses. 

Federated Film Exchanges of America 
secure four Bessie Love Prod. 

Storm Pictures, Inc., formed. Four a 
year the schedule. 

Thursday, Aug. 19 

Alfred S. Black refuses to meet Com- 
mittee of 9. Says First National financed 
Patterson Chicago meeting. Lynch plans 
no booking combine. 

Vitagraph warns trade against attempt- 
ed "theft" of Larry Semon. Under con- 
tract for 36 pictures. 

Seven state exhibitor bodies adopt res- 
olutions condemning United Artists' pol- 
icy on collecting rentals. 



Friday, Aug. 20 

Canadian exhibitors to meet on Firt>t 
National sub-franchise plan. Dissatisfac- 
tion evident. 

Lionel Barrymore to make three more 
productions for Associated First National, 
making a total of seven. 

Saturday, Aug. 21 

New York public schools experiment- 
ing with films as mode of instruction. 

Exhibitors League of Eastern Penn., 
Southern N. J. and Delaware convenes at 
Atlantic City. 

Monday, Aug. 23 

M. P. T. O. plans to eliminate star and 
director "stealing" in order to stabilize 
rentals, Cohen tells Atlantic City conven- 
tion. 

North Carolina exhibitors hear about 
workings of Lynch organization. 

Pathe to distribute Tom Santschi two- 
reel westerns. 

Tuesday, Aug. 24 

First National and Willard Patterson 
answer A. S. Black's charges regarding 
them. 

Messmore Kendall to head Goldwyn. 
Samuel Goldwyn to retire. 

Wednesday, Aug. 25 

S. A. Lynch breaks off all conferences 
with M. P. T. O. regarding theater cor- 
porations in the South. 

Famous Players and Goldwyn settle 
with Theater Owners' Chamber of Com- 
merce regarding last year's contracts. 

Harry Crandall refutes Tom Moore's 
statements regarding First National and 
National Booking Co. 

Thursday, Aug. 26 

M. P. T. O. ask A. S. Black for facts re- 
garding First National's alleged intimida- 
tion of exhibitors. 

Independent exchanges to continue 
handling Triangle product. New deal ar- 
ranged with Hallmark receiver. 

Premiere of "Way Down East" calla 
for $10 seats. 

Friday, Aug. 27 

70 per cent of U. S. Territory sold by 
Harry Garson on series of five new Clara 
Kimball Young productions. 

Independent Studios incorporated to 
build large studio near New York. 
Saturday, Aug. 28 

American Film Co. and the Biografia, 
Central European film companies, form 
new five million crown company. 

Monday, Aug. 30 

Federal Trade Commission investigat- 
ing Famous Players regarding possible 
violations of Section 7, Clayton Act. 

Babe Ruth seeks injunction against film 
companies and theater circuits regarding 
showing of 2 one-reel subjects. 

Tuesday, Aug. 31 

Fox Sunshine Comedy unit reorganized. 
Hampton Del Ruth out. 



101 



ON THE STAGE 

"The City" 

"Paid In Full" 

"The Trap" 

"The Talker" 

"The Ways and the 
Means" 

"The Builders" 

"The House of Bondage" 

"The Girl and the 
Game" 

"The Other Girl" 

"Just Out of College" 

"The Little Princess" 

"To Have and to Hold" 

"Hearts are Trumps" 

"The Best of Friends" 

"Because She Loved 
Him So" 




''Never Again" 

"The Gay Parisians" 

"On and Oft" 

"Lord Chumley" 

"The Highest Bidder" 

"Captain Lettarblair" 

"The Dancing Girl" 

"The Victoria Cross" 

"Held by the Enemy" 

"The Adventure of 
Lady Ursula" 

"The Colonial Girl" 

"The Maister of 
Woodbarrow" and 
a hundred other plays 



TULLY MARSHALL 



ON THE SCREEN 

"Passion Fruit" 

"Her Beloved Villain" 

"Old Hutch" 

"W hat Happened to 
Rosa" 

"The Slim Princess" 

"Double Speed" 

"Hawthorne of the 
U. S. A." 

"Joan the Woman" 

"The Devil Stone" 

"The Squaw Man" 

"We Can't Have Every- 
Thing" 

"The Man from Funeral 
Range" 

"Daughter of Mine" 

"The Girl from Red 
Butte" 

"Cheating Cheaters" 

"Intolerance" 

"The Sable Lorcha" 

"Let Katie Do It" 

"The Devil's Needle" 

"Martha's Vindication" 

"The Streets of Paris" 

"Oliver Twist" 

"Romance of the Red- 
woods" 

"A Modern Musketeer" 

"Maggie Pepper" 

"M'liss" 

"Bound in Morocco" 

"Her Kingdom of 
Dreams" 
and a hundred others 



102 



MARION FAIRFAX 



Stage Plays 

'The Talker" 

'The Chaperon" 

'The Builders" 

'Mrs. Boltay's Daughters" 

'The Ways and the Means" 

'Stephanie" 

'Fate" 

'Eager Heart" 
'The Quest" 



Recent Screen Plays 
and Continuities 

"River's End" 
"Go and Get It" 
"Don't Ever Marry" 
"Dinty" 

"No Drums Were Heard" 
"The Widow's Might" 
"The Clown" 
"The Secret Game" 



103 



Educational Institutions Equipped 
with Projection Machines 



EXPLANATORY NOTE 

To 38,282 questionnaires sent out by the visual instruction section of the division of educa- 
tional extension, Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, to locate the motion-picture 
projection machines in use for purely educational purposes in the United States, there were 10,351 
replies. A part of the information contained in thesL* replies may be tabulated as follows: 

Universities, colleges, normal schools, high schools, and elementary schools having motion-picture 

projection machines 1,129 

Intending to install at once 384 

Having arrangements with a local theatre, public hall, library, club, or church by which educational 

pictures may be shown for the benefit of students 2.17T 

Xot having projection mac hines or the use of projection machines and not planning to install at once . 6,761 

Total 10,351 

The information providing the figures for the second item was voluntary. If it had been solicited 
in the questionnaire, the figures would doubtless have been considerably larger. The reason for 
this inference is the unqualified fact of the interest in visual instruction which the questionnaire 
revealed and stimulated. 

There was no intention when the questionnaire was sent out to publish any part of the informa- 
tion obtained. The section has, however, received repeated requests for the list of universities, 
colleges, normal schools, and elementary schools having motion-picture projection machines. 
To meet these requests fairly, and as well to show an important detail as to the equipment of the 
educational institutions of the country, this list is here published. It is doubtless far from com- 
plete, since there has not been time to communicate with schools which did not receive the ques- 
tionnaire, or receiving it did not reply to it. But it is presumably incomplete only, and not in- 
accurate. It should, and doubtless will, be followed by later lists, supplying the deficiencies of 
this list and keeping the information up to date. List of names may mark progress, and more 
than that, may actually stimulate progress. 

ALABAMA 



City or town 



Institution 



Make of machine 



Capacity 
of audi, 
torium 



Auburn 
Birmingham 
Citronelle 
Cullman 

Ensley 

Fletcher. . . . 
Florence. . . . 
Jacksonville 
Lineville. . . . 

Marion 

Marbury. . . 

Marion 

Normal 

Selma 

Spring Hill 

Troy 

Tuskegee . . 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Howard College 

Citronelle White School 

St. Bernard College 

Ensley High School 

Fletcher High School 

Florence City School 

State Normal School 

North East Alabama Agricultural and 
Industrial Institute. 

Perry County High School 

Marbury High School 

Marion Institute 

State Agricultural and Mechanical College 

Selma Public Schools 

Spring Hill College 

State Normal School 

Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute 



Simplex 

Acme Machine No. 1 

Powers 6A 

Simplex 

Not given 

Powers 

Powers No. 2 

Acme 

Simplex 

Edison 

Motiograph 

Standard 

Powers 6B 

Edison Kinetoscope 

Edison Model D and Powers 6A 

Acme Portable 

( No name given) 



750 
400 

1.50() 
HOll 

l.OOo 
20() 
70|) 
500 
700 

300 
400 

l.OOo 
50() 
55() 
32 0 
400 

2,000 



105 



Jerome 

storm 



106 



ARIZONA 



City or town 



Institution 



Make of machine 



Capacity 
of audi- 
torium 



Globe 

Do 
Miami . 
Tucson 



Globe Public Schools 
Globe High Schools 
Miami Public Schools. 
University of Arizona 



Powers 6A 

. . . .do 

Powers Cameragraph 

De Vry Portable and Powers 
No. 5. 



700 
850 
400 
500 



ARKANSAS 



Kort Smith 

Do. 
Pine Bluff 
Stuttgart. . . 
Subiaco. . 



Peabody School 

DuVal School 

Pine Bluff High School 
Sutgart High School 
Si biico College 



Powers A 

Simplex 

Motiograph 

Victor Animatograph No. 2 

Edison Projective Kinetoscope, 
Model B. 



600 
700 
1.470 
650 
450 



CALIFORNIA 



Alameda 

Do 

Alhambra 

Alturas 

Berkeley 

Brentwood 
Burbank 

Chino 

Claremont 

Coachella 

Coalinga 

Coronado ....... 

Covina 

Danville 

Delano 

El Cajon 

Etna Mills 

Fairoaks 

Fresno 

Fullerton 

Hercules 

Hughson 

Inglewoo 1 

Lamanda Park 

Lancaste ■ 

Los Angeles 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Los Gat os 

Los Palos 

Mariposa 

Menlo Park 

Modesto 

Oakland 

Owensmith 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Reedley 

Redondo Beach. 

Red Bluff 

Rio Vista 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

Do 

Do 

Do 

San Bernardino 

Do 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Do 

San Jose 

Do 

San Luis Obispo 

San Rafael 

Santa Barbara. . . 
Santa Cruz 



Washington 

Alameda High School 

Alhambra City High School. . . . 
The Modic Union High School 

St. Josephs Academy 

Liberty Union High School. . . 
Burbank High School 



Chino High School 

Pomona College 

Coachella Valley Union High School 

Coalinga L'nion High School 

Co:onado Schools 

Covina Union High School 

San Ramon Valley Union High School 

Delano Joint Union High School 

El Cajon Valley LTnion High School 

Etna Union High School 

San Juan Union High Scho 1 

Fresno State Normal School 

Ful'erton Grammar School 

Hercules Club & Hercules Powder Co 

Hughson Union High School 

Inglewood Union High School 

Lamanda Park School 

Antelope Valley Union Hith School 

Hollywood High School 

St. Mary's Academy 

Thirtieth Street Intermediate School 

Lincoln High School 

Manual Arts High School 

Los Angeles High School 

Los Angeles State Normal School 

University of Southern California 

Montezuma Mountain Ranch School 

(No name given) 

Mariposa County High School 

St. Patrick's Seminary 

Modesta High School 

Fremont High School 

0 vensmith High School 

John Muir Intermediate School 

South Junior High School 

Re?dley Joint Union High School 

Redondo Union High School 

Re 1 Bluff High School 

St. Gertrude's Academy 

Sh?rman Institute (United States Indian 

School). 

Sacramento City Schools 

East Sacramento School 

Sacramento Evening Schools 

. . . .do 

Technical School Auditorium 

1 Street School 

Garfield School 

College of Notre Dame 

Mission High School 

College of Notre Dame 

St. Joseoh High School 

California Polytechnic School 

Mount Tamalpais Military Academy 

Santa Barbara High School 

Santa Cruz High School 



Motiograph 

Powers Cameragraph No. 6 . 

Edison 

Atlas 

Powers 6A , 

Simplex 

Edengraph Manufacturing Com 
pany No. 161. 

Edison ! 

Victor Model II 

Powers 6A 

Powers 6 

Powers 

Powers 6A 

Atlas 

(No name given) 

Victor Animatograph 

Motiograph 

Atlas 

Motiograph 

Edison 

Powers 

Atlas 

Powers 

Powers Cameragraph No. 6 

Edison 

Powers 6A 

Powers 6 

American Standard 

Powers 6A 

. . . .do 

Powers 3 

Powers A 

Motiograph No. 1 

De Vry 

Atlas 

Victor Animatograph 

Edison Exhibition 

(No name given) 

Powers 6 

Powers 

. . . .do 

Edison 

De Vry C-30 

Powers 6A 

Baird 

Edison Kinetoscope 

Powers Cameragraph 



Powers and Motiograph 

(No name given) 

Powers 

Powers 6 A 

Motiograph 1A 

(No name given) 

Portoscope 

Pathe 

. . . .do 

(No name given) 

Motiograph. 1917 

Cosmograph 

De Vry 

Powers N». 6 

Simplex 



650 
600 
500 
250 
500 
350 
140 

300 
4,735 
250 
600 
600 
500 
300 
400 
500 
300 
200 
1,200 
700 
400 
175 
1,150 
400 
300 
1,200 
400 
625 
1,500 
1,800 
2.000 
1,600 
400 
150 
300 
300 
500 
800 
800 
350 
400 
550 
1,000 
1.000 
880 
300 
725 

1.500 
250 
800 
800 
350 
300 
300 
165 
800 
500 
750 
200 
480 
500 
829 



107 




CLARA BERANGEK 

108 



CALIFORNIA— Continued 



City or town 



Institution 



Make of machine 



Santa Monica. . 

Do 

Sebastopol 

Sonora 

South Pasadena 

Susanville 

Tracy 

Vallejo 

Venice 

Victorville 

Wasco 

West Aihambra 

Whittier 

Williams 

Winters 

Woodlake 

Woodland 

Vreka 



Santa Monica High School 

Santa Monica City School District. . . . 

Sebastopol Grammar School 

Grammar and High Schools 

South Pasadena High School 

Susanville Union High School 

West Side Union High School 

Vallejo High School 

Venice Union Polytechnic High School 

Victor Valley Union High School 

Wasco Union High School 

Ramona Convent 

Whittier Union High School 

Williams Union High School 

Winters High School 

Woodlake Union High School 

Woodland High School 

Siskiyou Union High School 



Powers 

Powers 6A 

Standard 

(Names not known) . 

Powers 6 A 

Atlas 

Powers Cameragraph 

Lupin No. 6036 

Powers 

Powers 6A 

Portoscope 

Portoscope No. 746. . 

Simplex 

De Vry 

Motiograph 

Powers 6A 

Edison 

Atlas No. 5 



COLORADO 



Creede 

Delague. . . . 

Denver 

Castle Rock. 

Eaton 

Fort Collins. 

Golden 

Monte Vista 

Pueblo 

Rocky Ford. 
Sterling 



Mineral County High School 

Longfellow School 

Manual Training High School 

Douglas County High School 

Eaton Public School 

State Agricultural College 

Colorado School of Mines 

Monte Vista Public High School 

Pueblo High School 

Rocky Ford High School 

Logan County Industrial High School. 



Powers. . . . 
Powers No. 
Powers. 
Simplex. . . . 
Edison 

Baird 

Ford 

Simplex 

....do 

. . . do 

Powers 6B. 



CONNECTICUT 



Ansonia. . . . 

Derby 

Lakeville. . . 
New Haven 
Salisbury. . . 
Wallingford 
Watertown. 



Ansonia High School. . . . 

Derby High School 

Hotchkiss School 

New Haven High School 

Salisbury School 

Choate School 

Taft School 



Simplex 

Pathescope 

(No name given) 

Powers 

Powers 6A , 

Powers Cameragraph. 
Pathescope 



580 
200 
350 
1,500 
250 
400 
300 



DELAWARE 



Radnor 

Wilmington. 



Radnor Public Schools. 
Public School No. 23 . . . 



Victor Animatiograph. 
Edison 



350 



(*) 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



Armstrong Manual Training 

Army and Nany Preparatory School . 

Central High School 

Gallaudet College 

American University 

Catholic University of America 

Howard University 

McKinley Manual Training School. . 

Washington Public Schools 

Trinity College 

Western High School 

Wilson Normal 



Simplex 

Graphoscope 

. . . do 

. . . .do 

Powers 

Powers 6B , 

Motiograph 

. . . .do 

Simplex and Graphoscope. 

Graphoscope 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 



600 
150 

1,955 
250 
250 
500 
600 
500 

5,000 
400 
700 
500 



FLORIDA 



Alachua High School 

Bushnell High School 

Junior High School 

University of Florida 

Edward Waters College 

James Madison School 

Winter Park High School 

* Not given. 



Powers 

Edison Nc 2 

Powers 6B 

Powers A 

Powers 

Powers 6A 

Vicror Animatograph 



375 
500 
101) 
S00 
1 ,,-)()() 
1.200 
400 



1119 



AlbertA.Kaufman 



PRESENTS 



,SidniyFranku 





PROD 





ELE 



no 



GEORGIA 



City or town 



Institution 



Make of machine 



College Park 
Dahlonega. . 

Macon 

Manchester. 

Rome 

Springfield . 
Trion 



Georgia Military Academy 

North Georgia Agricultural College 

Mercer University 

Manchester Public Schools 

Shorter College 

Effingham Academy 

Trion Public Schools 



Standard 

Powers 6B 

Acme Portable 

Simplex and Powers 6B 

Powers 6 A 

;. . .do 

. . . .do 



IDAHO 



Athol 

Buhl 

Bu-ley 

Clarks Fork 
Emmett. . . . 
Mascony . . . 
Nezperce . . 

Oakley 

Plummer . . 
Sandpoint . 



Atliol High School 

Buhl High School 

Burley Schools 

Clarks Fork School 

Emmett Idaho High School 

University of Idaho Agricultural College 

Nezperce Public Schools 

Independent School District No. 2 

Plummer Public School 

Sandpoint City Schools 



Motiograph 

Nichols Power Co. . . 

Powers 6B 

Powers A 

(No name given) 

. . . .do 

Edison 

Keystone 

Powers Cameragraph 
Powers 6B 



300 
200 
4011 
loO 
200 
300 
200 
2.50 
300 
300 



ILLINOIS 



Alton i. . . . . 

Do 

Aurora 

Batavia 

Blue Pland 

Bourbannais 

Carlinville 

Carthage 

Centralia 

Chicago 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Croton on Hudson 

Crystal Lake 

Dakota 

Decatur 

Deerfield 

Des Plaines 

De Soto 

East St. Louis 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Fvanston 

Glencioe 

Gran te City 

Lo 

Green view 

Highland Park. . . . 

Do 

Hindsboro 

Jacksonville 

Joli-t 

Do 

Kenilworth 

La Salle 

Do 

Lee 

Long View 

Macomb 

Mat toon 

Do 

Do 

Moline 

May wood 

Mount Carroll 

Mount Pulaski 

Moweaqua 

Nashville 

Normal 



Theodore Roosevelt High School 

Washington School 

East High School 

Batavia Public Schools 

Blue Pland High School 

St. Viator College '. 

First Presbyterian Church School 

Carthage College 

Centralia Township High School 

Nicholas Renn High School 

Lane Technical School 

St. Rita College 

Wendell Phillips High School 

Harrison Technical High School 

Austin High School 

Holy Trinity School and High School . 

Croton High School 

Crystal Lake Public Schools 

Dakota School for Boys 

Decatur High School 

Deerfield Grammar School 

Des Plaines Grammar School 

De Soto Public School 

Horace Mann School 

East St. Louis High School 

TefTerson School 

Signal Hill School 

Schools of District 76 

Glencoe Public School 

Granite City Public Schools 

Granite High School 

Greenview Schools 

Board of Education of District 107 

Deerfield Shields Township High School 

Hindsboro Union High School 

Illinois Woman's College 

Farrague School Center 

.Toliet Township High School 

New Tier Township High School 

Lincoln School 

St. Vincent's School. St. Patrick's School 

and St. Patrick's High School 

Lee Public School 

Long View Township High School 

Western Illinois State Normal School . 

Lowell School 

Bennett School 

Lincoln 

Moline Public Schools 

Washington School 

Frances Shimer School 

Mount Pulaski Township High School . 

Moweaqua Public Schools 

Nashville Public Schools 

Illinois State Normal University 



Pathescope 

(No name given) 

Powers OA 

Powers B 

Simplex 

Acme 

Powers 

Standard 

(No name given) 

Simplex 

. . . .do 

Powers 

Atlas 

Powers Cameragraph GB 

Powers 

Powers Cameragraph 6A 

(No name given) 

Motiograph de Luxe 

(No name given) 

Powers 6 Cimeragraph. . . 

Motiograph 

Edison 

Powers 5 

(No name given) 

Simplex 

do 

Educator 

Powers 

Simplex 

Educator 

. . . .do 

Powers 6 

Simplex 

Powers 6 Cameragraph 

Edison 

(No name given) 

Atlas No. 5 

Simplex 

Powers 

(No name given) 

. . . do 



. . . .do 

Edison 

Powers 6B 

Duplex Projectors. . . . 

Powers 6 

do 

Victor Animatograph 

Mcintosh 

Precision 

Enterprise 

Keystone 

Victor Animitograph 
Atlas 



Ill 



MITCHELL LEWIS 

who will be seen in a series of 

Jack London Releases 

In the Season 1920-1921 

"BURNING DAYLIGHT" "MUTINY OF ELSINORE. ' 

"GOD OF HIS FATHERS" 



112 



ILLINOIS — Continued 



City or town 



Oak Park 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Palmer 

Peoria 

Peru 

Pontiac 

Prairie City. . . . 

Rankin 

Rock Island . 

Do 

Sandusky 

Shermerville . . . . 

Springfield 

Spring Valley 
Crbana 

Venice 

Waukegan 

W est Hammond 
Wheaton 



Institution 



Win. Beye School 

Oak Park and River Forest High School . . 

Oak Park Public School System 

Whittle School 

Palmer High School and Grades 

Peotia High School 

St. Bede College 

Pontiac Township High School 

Prairie City Public School 

Rankin Township and Public School 

Rock Island High School 

Lincoln School 

Sandusky High School ...... 

Shermerville School 

Flitshans Junior High School 

Hall Township High and Vocational School 
University of Illinois 



Venice Public School 

Waukegan Township High School. 
West Hammond Public Schools. . . 
Wheaton Schools 



Make of machine 



Motiograph. 

Simplex ■ 

do 

Atlas 

Motiograph 

Motiograph No. 2 

Powers 

do 



.do 

Keystone 

Victor '. 

do 

Motiograph 

Pathe 

Simplex 

Powers 

Simplex and Powers Camera- 
graph 

Powers Cameragraph ....... 

Edison 

Atlas 

do 



Capacity 
of audi- 
torium 



800 
1.450 
1.200 
500 
300 
925 
250 
500 
150 
100 
600 
700 
1.025 
450 
550 
1.000 
450 

500 
500 
500 
50 



INDIANA 



Advance 

Albion 

Beech Grove 

Breemen 

Bristol 

Crawfordsville. 
Culver 

Do 

Earlham 

Fortville 

Evansville 

Franklin 

Gary 

Greencastle. . . 

Hebron 

Howe 

Hudson 

Indianapolis. . . 

Do 

Do 

Knightstown. 



LaFayette 

Lewisville 

Logansport 

Marion 

Mishawaka 

Mooresville 

Mulberry 

Noblesville 

North Salem 

Notre Dame 

Ossian 

Pendleton 

Portland 

Do 

St. Mary of the Woods 

Seymour 

Southport 

South Bend 

Staunton 

Stockwell 

Thorntown 



Advance High School 

Albion High School 

Beech Grove School 

Bremen High School 

Washington Typewriting School 

Crawfordsville High School 

Culver Military Academy 

. . . .do 

Earlham College 

Fortville (Independent) Public School 

Central High School 

Franklin College 

Froebel School 

Greencastle Public Schools 

Hebron Public School 

Howe School 

Hudson Public Schools 

E. Manual Training High School 

Ben Davis High School 

Sacred Heart School 

Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' 
Home. 

Purdue University 

Lewisville High and Common School 

High School 

Ben Davis School 

Mishawaka High School 

Mooresville Public School 

Weidner Institute 

Levinson High School and Grade Schools... . 

North Salem Public Schools 

Notre Dame University 

Ossian High School 

Pendleton High School 

High School 

. . . .do 

St. Mary of the Woods College 

Seymour High School 

Southport Schools 

St. Joseph's Academy 

Staunton High School 

Stockwell High School 

Thorntown Public Schools 



Mcintosh Automatic Balopticon. 

Edison 

Incandescent 

Powers Cameragraph 

Keystone 

Powers 1 

do 

Powers 6A 

Graphoscope 

Zenith 

Simplex 

Universal Motion Picture 

Simplex 

Motiograph 

Motiograph No. 1 

Powers 6A 

Edison 

Powers 3A 

Powers 6 A 

Powers 

Powers 6A 



Simplex 

Motiograph 

Edison 

Powers 6A 

Simplex 

Powers No. 6 . . . . 

Powers No. 5 

Zenith 

De Vry 

Powers 6A 

Enterprise 

Powers 

Bausch & Lomb. 

Zenith 

Motiograph 

Zenith 

Blake 

(Not given) 

Edison 

Powers 

Motiograph 



350 
150 
400 
100 
100 

2,200 
700 

1.200 
800 
700 

1.491 
300 
800 
810 
350 
350 
125 
500 
500 
900 
700 

350 
750 

1,012 
500 

1,000 
250 
500 
350 
283 

3,000 
100 

1,500 
250 
200 
700 
350 
400 
500 
150 
200 
400 



Alta 

Alexander. . 
Audubon. . 
Belmond. . . 
Burlington. 
Calumet. . . 

Carroll 

Centerville. 
Clarence. . . 



IOWA 

Alta Independent Consolidated School 

Alexander Consolidated School 

Audubon High School 

Belmond Public Schools 

Burlington High School 

Calumet Graded School 

St. Peter and Paul's School 

Centerville High School 

Clarence Public School 



Simplex 

Powers 6 A 

Edison 

Powers 

(No name given) 

Powers 

Motiograph 

(No name given) 
Motiograph 



700 
165 
300 
675 
750 
200 
600 
350 
260 



113 



MYRTLE STEDMAN 

LA TE RELEASES 

' 'Sex' ' ' 'The Silver Horde' ' ' 'Old Dad' ' 

"Harriet the Piper' ' ' 'Sowing the Wind' ' 



114 



IOWA— Continued 



City or town 



Clermont 

College Springs. 

Davenport 

Des Moines 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Dubuque 

Do 

Do 

Do. 

Do 

Do 

Dumont 

Fairfield 

Geneva 

Greenfield 

Hampton 

Hansell 

Holstein 

Hull 

In wood 

Iowa City 

Lamoni 

Do 

Lo3t Nation. . . . 
Mount Vernon . 
New Providence 

Orient 

Oskaloosa 

Plainfield 

Remsen 

Schaller 

Selma 

Sheldon 

Tama 

Traer 

Woodbine 



Institution 



Public School 

College Springs Consolidated Schools 

St. Ambrose College 

Drake University 

North High School 

West High School. 

East Des Moines H.^gh School 

Dubuque High School 

Dubuque College 

Mount St. Joseph College 

Irving School 

Lincoln School 

Visitation College Preparatory 

Dumont Consolidated School 

Fairfield High School 

Geneva Consolidated School 

Public Schools ! 

Hampton School 

Hansell High School or Consolidated School 

Public Schools 

Hull School 

Inwood High School 

St. Marys School 

Graceland College 

Public Schools 

Public School 

Cornell College 

New Providence Consolidated School 

Public School 

Penn College 

High School \ . 

St. Marys School 

Public Schools 

(No name given) ' 

Public Schools 

Public School 

Public Schools 

Normal and High School 



Make of ma:hi.ie 



Powers 6 A 

Powers 

. . do 

Simplex 

Animato3 "aph 

Victor Anin atograph 

Powers. . . : 

DeVry 

Motiograph de Luxe. . . 

Atlas 

....do 

. . . .do 

(No name given) 

Victor Animalograph. . . 

Edison 

Victor Animatograph 

De Vry 

(No name given) 

Victor Animatograph. . . 

Edison 

Atlas No. 5 . . . . 

Powers 6 Camert^raph 

Motiograph 

Victor Animatograph. . . 

. . . .do 

(No name given) 

Simplex 

Victor Animatograph . . 

Motiograph 

. . . .do 

Victor Animatograph. . . 

Edison 

Motiograph 

Victor Animatograph. . . 

Powers 6 

Powers Simplex 

Victor Animatograph. . . 
Edison 



Altamont 

Atchison 

Do 

Attica 

Belle Plaine 

Bird City 

Caldwell 

Canton 

Cherokee 

Cimarron 

Circleville 

Cottonwood Falls 

Dighton 

Dodge City 

Easton 

Effingham 

Emporia 

Do 

Erie 

Fairview 

Fredonia 

Garden Plain 

Goff 

Havensville 

Hiawatha 

Do 

Hoyt 

Kansas City 

Lawrence 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Manhattan 

Marysville 

Matfield Green. . 

Oakley 

Ottawa 

Parsons 

Pittsburgh 

St. Marys 

Syracuse 

Wilmore 



KANSAS 

Labette County High School 

Atchison Public School 

St. Benedict's College 

Attica Public School 

Belle Plaine High School and Graded School 

Bird City High School 

Caldwell High School 

Canton City Schools 

Crawford County High School 

Cimarron High School 

Circleville City Schools 

Chase County High School 

Department of Education 

Dodge City High School 

Easton High School 

Atchison County High School 

Kansas State Normal School 

Emporia High School 

Erie High School 

Fairview Rural High School 

Fredonia High School 

Catholic Church 

Goff Public Schools. . .' 

Havensville 

Hiawatha High School 

Hiawatha City Schools 

Hoyt Rural High School 

Western University and State Industrial 
Department. 

University of Kansas 

Lewis Public School 

Lincoln City Schools 

Kansas State Agricultural College 

Marvsville Citv Schools 

Matfield Rural High School 

Oakley Graded and High School 

Lincoln School 

Parsons City Schools 

State Manual Training Normal College. . . . 

St. Mary's College. 

Syracuse Schools 

Wilmore Rural High School 



Powers 6A. 
Edi;on .... 
Po.ve s 6A. 



(No name given) 

....do 

Powers A 

Victor Animatog aph 

(No name given) 

Powers Cameragraph 

Powers 

Powers 6A 

. . . .do 

Edison , 

Powers Cameragraph 

Motiograph 

Powers 6 A 

De Vry Portable and Powers OA 

Powers 6 A 

Pathe Premier 

Powers 5 

Motiograph 1A 

Motiograph 

(No name given) 

Powers 6 A 

DeVrv Portable 

. . . .<3o 

Powers 6A 

Powers No. 5 

Power's VI 

Animatograoh 

(No name given)' 

Power's Cameragraph 

Animatograph 

Pathescope 

Edison 

do 

Vo-esco^e ...U. 

Powers 6A 

Powers 8 .' 

Powers 5A 

Edison 



350 
300 



265 
392 
514 
150 
400 
300 
175 
400 
200 
450 
200 
400 

2.500 
900 
500 
250 
648 

(*) 
300 
200 
375 
572 
310 
350 

800 
900 
300 

2.000 
250 
300 
150 
400 
550 

3.000 
700 
600 
300 



Not given. 

115 



FRANK LLOYD 

M. P. D. A. 

DIRECTOR 

of the following Box Office Successes 

"Madame X" 

With Pauline Frederick 

"The Woman in Room 13" 

"The Silver Horde" 

' 'World and Its Women" 

"When a Man Sees Red" 

"The Rainbow Trail" 

"Riders of the Purple Sage" 
"Les Miserables" 

''Tales of Two Cities" 



116 



KENTUCKY 



Institution 



Make of machine 



Berea College 

Western Kentucky State Normal School 
Kentucky Normal and Industrial Institute 

Louisville Boys' High School 

Louisville Girls' High School 

St. Xavier's College 



Nicholas Powers. 

Powers 6B 

. . . .do 

(No name given) 
Nicholas Powers 
Powers 5 



LOUISIANA 



'Jefferson College 

St. Charles College 

Normal School and Academy of Sacred 
Heart. 

Greensburg High School 

Lutcher High School 

Academy of the Sacred Heart 

Southern University and A. and M. College 
Thibodaux High School 



Powers KB 
. . . .do. . . . 
Edison ... 



do. . . 

Simplex. 
Powers 6 
Powers 

do. . . 



MAINE 



1 


Caribou High School 

Bates College 




300 


Lewiston 




450 










MARYLAND 





I'nited States Naval Academy. 

St. John College 

Johns Hopkins University 

Friends School 

The Park School 

St. Joseph's College 

Charlotte Hall School 

Hood College 

Hyattsville Arcade 

McDonough School 

Mount Airy High School. 

Blue Ridge College 

The Tome School 

Gilman County School for Boys 



Baird 

Graphoscope 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

(No name given) . 

Graphoscope 

Powers 6A 

Graphoscope 

Powers 6 A 

Graphoscope 

(No name given) . 

Powers 

Powers 6A 

Simplex 



900 
250 
419 
250 
225 
600 
150 
400 
220 
200 
200 
700 
1,000 
100 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Adams 

Andover 

Atlantic 

Billerica 

Boston 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do : . . . . 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Boston (Dorchester) 

Do 

Boston (Dorchester Cen 
ter). 

Boston (Jamaica Plain) 

Boston (Roxbury) 

Do 



Adams High School 

Phillips Academy 

Francis W. Parker School 

Mitchell Military Boys School. 

John A. Andrew District 

High School of Commerce 

Prince District 

Abraham Lincoln School 

Huntington School 

Comins School 

Quincy School 

Sherwin School 

St. John's School 

Gilbert Stuart School 

Phillips Brooks School 

Dorchester High School 



Lowell Grammar School 

High School of Practical Arts 

George Putnam (Sec. 1), William 
Garrison (Sec. 2). 

Wendell Phillips School 

Jonas Perkins School 

W. H. McEIwain School 

Lincoln School 

Boston College 

The High School 

Chapman School 

John Chevesus School 

State Normal School 



Pathe Freres 

Powers Canieragraph 

New Premier Pathescope . . 

Powers 

Pathescope 

Simplex 

Premier Pathescope 

Kok 

Powers 6A 

Edison 

Pathescope 

do 

Pathescope and Balopticon. 

Pathescope 

. . . .do 

(No name given) 



Pathescope 

Powers Cameragraph 6A. 
Pathescope 



do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Simplex 

(No name given) . 
Lincoln & Parker. 

Pathescope 

Powers 5 



800 
550 
300 
700 
820 
350 
750 
300 
400 
300 
600 

1.1)00 
500 
620 

1.000 

850 
650 
450 

432 
.-,0(1 
400 
100 
500 



800 
400 
610 



* Not given. 

117 




118 



MASSACHUSETTS— Continued 



City or town 



Framingham 

Haverhill 

Holyoke 

Do 

Leominster 

Lynn 

Do 

Do 

Maiden 

Mavnard 

Do 

Me'.ose 

Do 

Mount Hermon 

Ne.vburyport 

Newton 

Northampton 

Norwood 

Plymouth 

Quincy 

Do 

Do 

Quincy (Wollaston) 

Revere 

Springfield 

Do 

Springfield (Indian Or- 
chard). 

Salem 

South Boston 

Stoneham. . . 

Stow 

Wakefield 

Do 

Waltham 

Webster 

Do 

Wellesley Hills 

Worcester 

Do 

Do 



Institution 



. . . .do 

School District 

Hamilton Street School 

Holyoke High SchoDl 

Field Grammar School 

Western Junior High School 

Central Junior High School 

Pickering Junior High and Grammar School 

Center Grammar School 

Maynard High School 

High and Junior High Intermediate 

Washington School 

Franklin-Whittier Schools 

Mount Hermon School 

Jackman Grammar School 

Bigelow School 

Smith College 

Everett School 

High School 

Adams School 

Cranch School 

High School 

Wollaston School 

Wolcott School 

Technical High School 

High School of Commerce 

Myrtle Street School 



State Normal School and Practical School 

South Boston High School 

Lincoln School 

Stow Union School 

Greenwood School 

Franklin School 

St. Joseph's School 

Bartlett High School 

Bartlett High School and Public Schools 

Academy of the Assumption 

Clark College 

Holy Cross College 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 



Make of machine 



Pathescope 

Lincoln & Parker 

Stereopticon 

Powers 

(No name given) 

Pathescope 

Pathe 

Simplex 

Pathescope 

. . . .do 

Premier Pathescope 

Pathescope 

. . . .do 

Simplex 

Edison 

Pathescope 

Powers Cameragraph 6B. 

Edison 

(No name given) 

Pathescope 

...do 

....do 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

Powers 6A 

....do ■./... 

do 



Motiograph 

Powers 

(No name given) 

New Premier Pathescope. 

Pathescope 

. . . .do 

Edison 

Bausch & Lomb 

Lincoln & Parker 

Powers 

Edison 

American Standard 

Powers Cameragraph 



Capacity 
of audi- 
torium 



550 
60 
400 

1,000 
100 
550 

1,000 
700 
700 
125 
500 
325 
160 
550 
60 
400 

2,300 
50 
325 
500 
230 
800 
504 
450 
700 

1,500 
600 

700 

683 



125 
300 
400 
350 
350 
400 
200 
300 
600 
300 



MICHIGAN 



South Branch School 

Adrian Public Schools 

Normal School of Physi.il Education 

Baldwin High School 

Cedar Springs School Commerce 

Clarkston High School 

Northern High School 

Holy Redeemer Auditorium 

University of Detroit 

Douglas Public School 

Grand Ledge High School 

South High School 

Union High School 

Central High School 

High School 

Port Austin Public School 

Ursuline Academy 

St. Joseph's School 

Sebewaing Public Schjjl 

South Haven Public Schools 

Vandalia Public Schools 

Wakefield Public Schools 

Michigan State Normal College 



(No name given) 

Powers 6B 

Motiograph and Pathescope. 

Powers 6B 

Powers 

do 

De Vry 

Simplex 2 

Edison and Acme projectors. 

(No name given) 

Motiograph 1A 

(No name given) 

Simplex.- 

Edison 

Powers 

Pathescope 

Erkoscope 

Pathescope 

Bausch & Lomb 

Powers Cameragraph 6B. . . . 

Motiograph 

De Vry , 

Powers Cameragraph 



MINNESOTA 



Adrian 

Alberta 

Askov 

Aurora 

Bird Island. 
Do . . . . 

Buhl 

Canton 

Clo iuet. . . 



High S:hojl 

Alberta Consolidated School. 
Askov Consolidated School. 

Aurora Public Schools 

Bird Island Public School. . . . 

do .' 

Buhl High School 

Canton Public School 

Cloquet High School 



(No name given) 

Royal 1915 Model 

Victor Animatograph. 
Motiograph de Luxe. 

Simplex 

. . . .do 

Powers 6B 

Powers 5 , 

Powers 6 



85 
350 
300 
400 
250 
250 
450 
300 
900 



119 



JOHN W. NOBLE 



MAKING SPECIAL 



MESSMORE KENDALL 
ROBERT CHAMBERS 
PRODUCTIONS 



ADDRESS 
CAPITOL THEATER BLDG. 
NEW YORK 



120 



MINNESOTA— Continued 



Institution 



Make of machine 



Correll Consolidated Schools, Independent 
District No. 55. 

Central High School 

Boys' Cathedral High School 

Sacred Heart School 

Eveleth High School 

Faribault High School 

Gilbert High School 

Jackson City Schools 

Lakefield Public Schools 

Schools of Todd County 

High School 



SS. Peter and Paul s School 

Central High 

South High School 

St. Anthony School 

East High School 

State Normal School 

Concordia College 

Mound Consolidated School 

Lutheran Brotherhood St. Olaf College 

Okabena Consolidated Schools 

United States Indian School 

State Training School 

Consolidated School District No. 1 

Rochester High School 

do 

State Normal School at St. Cloud 

St. Benedict's College and Academy. . . . 
St. Francis Community High School. . . 

Humboldt High School 

College of St. Catherine 

Geo. VVeitbrecht Mechanical Arts High 
School. 

Johnson High School 

Creton High School 

Utica Public School 

Wahkon Consolidated School 

Wheaton Public Schools 

College of St. Teresa ; 



Edison . 



Safety Projector 

Zenith 

Premier Pathescope 

Simplex 

Powers Cameragraph 

Powers 6B 

(No name given) 

Motiograph 

(No name given) 

Community Motion Picture Ma- 
chine. 

Powers No. 6 

Powers No. 6A 

. . . .do 

(No name given) 

Powers 

Simplex 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

Powers 6A 

Motiograph 

Powers No. 6 

Pathescope 

Powers 6A 

do 

Simplex 

. . . .do 

Royal 

Simplex 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 



. . . do 

Acme 

(No name given) 

Victor Animatograph 

Mtiltigraph 

Edison No. 6 



MISSISSIPPI 



St. Mary of the Pines Academy 

Biloxi Public Schools ) 

Franklin County Agricultural High School 

St Joseph's Institute. 

Haven Institute 

Pass Christian White Public School 

Pass Christian High School. . 

Clay County Agricultural High School 

Starkville Public Schools 

University of Mississippi 



Edison 

(No name given) 

Victor Animatograph 

Powers 

Victor Animatograph. 

De Vry C-90. . . . : 

do ! 

De Vry 

(No name given) 

Powers 6A 



500 
550 
400 
400 
500 
350 
275 
500 
500 
500 



MISSOURI 



Booneville 

Burlington Junction. 

Calhoun 

Cameron 

Chillocothe 

Clayton 

Columbia 

Conception 



Kemper Military School 

Burlington Junction Public School 

Calhoun High School 

Mount Wesleyan College 

Garrison School 

Chaminade College 

School of Engineering of Missouri 

Conception College. Industrial School, St. 
Joseph's University Academy. 

Fairfax High School 

St. Theodore's School 

Douglas High School 

Hardin Public School 

Jackson School 

Joplin High School 

St. Aloysius Parochial School 

Rockhurst College 

Central High School 

Kennett High School 

Win. Jewell College 

Maplewood Public Schools 

Philadelphia Public School 

* Not given. 

121 



Powers 6A 

Acme Portable 

Balopticon Model B. . 
Victor Animatograph. 

(No name given) 

Victor Animatograph. 

Simplex No. 718 

Edison D 



(No name given) . 
Educator. . 

do. 
Edison 

(No machine) . 
Simplex 
Powers 

Acme Portable 

Powers 7B 

Powers Cameragraph. 

Edison 

Educator 

Motiograph 



FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN BEVERLY BAYNE 

STAGE and SCREEN 

EDWARD SMALL 

1493 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



MISSOURI — Continued 



City or town 



Institution 



Make of machine 



Capacity 
of audi- 
torium 



Queen City .... 
St. Joseph 

De 

St. Louis 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Sedalia 

Skidmore 

Webster Groves 
Do 

West Plains 



Queen City High School 

Hall School 

Robidoux Junior High School. . 

Academy of the Visitation 

Central High School 

The Principia 

Academy of the Sacred Heart. . 
Grover Cleveland High School. 
Loretto Academy 



McKinley High School. . 
George R. Smith College. 



Skidmore School. . 
Lockwood School. 
Loretto College. . . 



West Plains Public Schools. 



Standard 

Motiograph, 1916 

. . . .do 

Powers 6 Cameragraph 

Simplex 

Cosmograph 

Thompson 

Simplex 

Educational Motion Picture Ma 
chine. 

Motiograph 

Educational Motion Picture Ma- 
chine. 

Powers 6A 

Educator 

Educational Motion Picture 

Company. 
(No name given) 



250 
200 
800 
350 
1,100 
400 
1,200 
2,040 
180 

1.000 
400 

400 
100 
400 

300 



MONTANA 



Belgrade. 
Boulder. . 
Bozeman 
Missoula. 



Belgrade Public and High School. . 
Jefferson County Free High School 

Longfellow School 

State University of Montana 



Balopticon 

American Projector. . 

(No name given) 

Victor Animatograph 



100 
125 
100 
200 



NEBRASKA 



Bassett. . 
Carlton. . . 
Franklin. . 
Hastings. . 
Kearney . . 
Lincoln . . 
Miller. . . . 
Omaha. . . 
Seward . . . 
Valparasio 
Wayne. . . 



Rock County High School 

Carlton High School District 26 

Franklin High School 

Hastings High School 

Nebraska State Normal School . 

Prescott School 

Miller Public Schools 

Creighton University 

Seward City Schools 

Valparaiso High School 

State Normal School 



Victor Animatograph No. 2 

(No name given) 

Powers 6A 

Powers 6A Cameragraph. . . 

Powers 6A 

Motiograph 

Edison 

Powers 6B 

Simplex 

Motiograph 

Powers No. 2 



300 
550 
250 
660 
1,223 
150 
250 
900 
350 
(*) 
800 



NEVADA 



Elko ... 

Reno 

Winnemucca 



Elko County High School 
University of Nevada. . . . 
Winnemucca High School 



Powers Camerograph 

Motiograph. : 

Motiograph Model No. 1A 



500 
35 
750 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Claremont. . . . 

Concord 

Durham 

Keene 

Meridan 

New Hampton 
Plymouth 



Stevens High School 

St. Paul's School 

New Hampshire College 

Stare Normal School 

Kimball Union Academy 

New Hampton Literary Institute 
Plymouth Normal School 



Pathescope 

Powers No. 6. . . . 

Powers 

Powers 6A 

Edison 

(No name given) 
Simplex 



450 
450 
700 
300 
350 
400 
300 



NEW JERSEY 



Audubon 

Bayonne 

Do 

Do 

Borough Demarest 
Convent Station. . . 

Edgewater 

Elizabeth 

Do 

Freehold 

Grantwood 

Hackettstown 



Audubon School No. 1 

Public School No. 9 

Philip G. Vroom No. 2 School. 

Public School No. 9 

Demarest Public School 

College of St. Elizabeth 

School No. 1 

Winfield Scott Public School. . 

Battin High School 

New Jersev Military Academy 
Cliffside Park High School. . . . 
Centenary Collegiate Institute 



Atlas No. 3 

Simplex 

(No name given) 

Simplex 

Pathescope 

Powers 

Edison Kinetoscope. . 

Powers 6A 

Powers 

Pathescope 

Powers Cameragraph 
Edison 



250 
900 
800 
800 
300 
500 
424 
524 
500 
300 
525 
630 



123 



He Came Out of the Army 
and Made 



"THE FLAPPER" 



Now 

MYRON SLEZNICK 

Announces 

Alan Crosland 
Productions 



124 



NEW JERSEY — Continued 



City or town 



Ilackcnsack. . . . 
Harrison 

Hawthorne 

Bightown 

Irvington 

Jersey City .... 

Leonardo 

Mount Holly. . . 
Xew Brunswick 
Orange 

Paterson 

Do 

Princeton 

Shiloh 

Trenton 

Wenonah 

W est New York 

Do 

Wildwood 

Woodstown .... 



Institution 



School No. 3, State Street 

Washington No. 1, Hamilton No. 2, Lincoln 
No. 3. 

Hawthorne Schools 

Peddie Institute 

Grove Street School 

St. Peter's High School 

Middletown Township High School 

Mount Holly Public Schools 

Rutgers College 

Orange High School and Central Vocatioanl 
School. 

City Normal School 

Hawthorne Teachers' Association 

Princeton University 

Hopewell Township High School 

Junior High School No. 1 

Wenonah Military Academy 

West New York Schools 

Public School No. 1 

Wildwood Public Schools 

Woodstown Public School 



Make of machine 



Simplex 

New Premier Pathescope 



Graphoscope Junior. . 
Premier Pathescope. . 

(No name given) 

Powers 

Edison 

Pathescope 

Powers Cameragraph. 
Edison 



(No name given) 
Graphoscope Junior 

Simplex. 

Powers 

...do 

Pathescope 

Powers 6A 

(No name given) 

Powers 6 A 

do 



NEW MEXICO 



Clayton 
Roswell 

Santa Ke 



Clayton High. School 

New Mexico Military Institute 

Santa Ke City Schools 



Motiograph 

Powers 6A and Victor Animato 

graph II. 
Pathescope 



NEW YORK 



Aurora 

Brooklyn 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Buffalo 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do..: 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Canisteo 

Clinton 

Cornwall-on-Hudson 

Do 

Depen 

Dexter 

Dobbs Perry 

Dunkirk 

Elmira 

Do 

Kort Ann 

Hasting-on-Hudson. . 

Ithaca 

Lackawana 

Lake Placid Club. . . 

Larchmont 

Lockport 



Lynbrook 

Manlius 

Mechanicsville. 
Mamaroneck. . . 
Middletown . . . 

Monticello 

Morris 

Morrisville 

Myers 

Nellrston 

Newcomb 



Wells College 

Manual Training High School 

Bay Ridge High School 

Brooklyn Training School for Teachers. . . . 

Bushwick High School 

Boy's High School 

St. John's College 

Hutchinson-Central High School 

Conisius College and Corisius High School. 

South Park High School 

Institute Sisters of St. Joseph 

St. Patrick's School 

Buffalo Technical High School 

Holy Angles' School 

Nichols School 

Buffalo State Normal School 

Lafayette High School 

Maston Park High School 

Canisteo Public School No. 1 

Hamilton College 

New York Military Academy 

The Stone School 

Depen Union Schools 

Dexter High School 

Misses Masters School 

Junior High School 

Vocational School /. 

School No. 5 

Fort Ann High School 

Hasting-on-Hudson Public School 

Ithaca Public Schools 

Lackawana Public Schools 

Lake Placid School 

Larchmont Public School 

St. Joseph's Academy and Industrial Fe- 
male Institute. 

Lynbrook High School 

St. John's School 

Mechanicsville High School 

Oaksmere Merrill School 

Middletown High School 

Monticello School, District 1 

Morris High School 

New York State School of Agriculture 

International Salt Co 

First and Second Supervisory District 

Newcomb Union School 



Powers No. 5 

Acme Projector 

Powers 6A 

Simplex 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

Simples and Pathescope 

(No name given) 

Pathescope .- 

Edison 

Simplex 

Powers No. 5 

Standard 

Victor 

Simplex 

. . . .do 

Atlas No. 3 

Simplex 

. . . .do 

Powers 6B 

Pathescope 

Climax 

Pathescope 

. . . .do 

Premier Pathescope 

(No name given) 

....do.. 

Powers 

Simplex 

Pathe 

Edison 

Pathescope 

Powers 



Pathescope 

Simplex 

Powers Cameragraph 
American Projector . . 

New Premier 

Edison Kinetoscope. . 

(No name given) 

Powers No. 6 

Pathe 

Pathescope 

(No name given) 



300 
60 
995 
400 
200 
,200 
700 
700 
600 
,000 
515 
500 
400 
800 
150 
800 
.200 
.200 
600 
300 
400 
125 
,000 
372 
250 
500 
150 
500 
200 
400 
,100 
600 
200 
300 
500 

350 
500 
700 
125 
LM'.l 
300 
160 
350 
200 
650 
200 



* Not given. 



125 



NEW YORK — Continued 



City or town 



New York 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Phoenicia 

Pleasantville 

Do 

Rensselaer 

Richmondville 

Rockville Center 

Roe 

Sea Cliff 

Saratoga Springs 

Schenectady 

Do 

Sloan 

Syracuse 

Tarry town-on-H udson 
Troy 



Institution 



Washington Irving High School. 

Lehman-Leete School 

De La Salle Institute 

Riverdale Country School 

Evander Childs High School 

Hamilton Institute for Girls 

Ethical Culture High School 

Stuyvesant High School 

Ursuline Academy 

C'lason Military Academy 

Woodland School 

Pleasantville High School 

Pleasantville High School (girls). 

St. John's Academy 

Richmondville High School 

Rockville Center Public Schools. 
Roe High School District No. 3. . 

Sea Cliff High School 

Saratoga Springs High School . . 

Schenectady High School 

Union College 

Sloan Union Schools 

St. Peter's Italian Church 

Marymount School 

Troy Boy's Club (Inc) 



Make of machine 



Powers No. 6A 

Pathescope 

Pathe 

Optigraph 

Powers Cameragraph. . . 

Powers No. 6 

Pathescope 

Simplex 

Edison Kinetoscope. . . . 

Simplex 

Edison Cinematograph 

Simplex 

Powers 

American projector 

Simplex 

Powers OA 

Baird Machine 

Powers 

Powers 6A 

Simplex 

Edison 

Powers Cameragraph. . . 

Powers 

. . . .do 

Baird 



Capacity 
of audi- 
torium 



1 . " n 
L.'5 
5 JO 
150 
'141 

no 

2i0 
1.5)0 
125 
400 
40 
450 
300 
800 
400 
400 
500 
500 
400 
684 
275 
400 
400 
150 
800 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Asheville 

Belmont 

Castalia 

Chapel Hill 

Gaston 

Raeford 

Red Springs 

Roanoke Rapids 

Tarboro 

Try on 

Vass 

West Raleigh. . . 



Asheville School 

St. Benedict's Catholic Collegiate School . . 

Castalia High School 

University of North Carolina 

Lincoln Academy 

Raeford Public School and Hoke City 

Flora Macdonald College 

Roanoke Rapids Graded Schools 

Tarboro Public School 

Tryon Graded School 

Sandhill Farm Life School 

North Carolina State College of Agriculture 
and Engineering. 



Victor Animatograph 

Powers 6 A 

Monarch 

Powers 6 

Edison 

Powers 

Graphoscope 

Powers 

Graphoscope 

Pov/ers Cameragraph 

(No name given) 

Powers Standard 6A 



250 
300 
615 
650 
350 
500 
800 
650 
600 
200 
200 
3.30 



NORTH DAKOTA 



Crosby 

Jamestown. . . . 
Devil's Lake. . 

Douglas 

Fargo 

Minnewaukan 

Newville 

Sentinel Butte 
Starkweather. 

Upham 

Valley City. . . 
Van Hook 



Crosby City Schools 

St. John's Academy 

Devil's Lake High School 

Carpron No. 95 School 

North Dakota Agricultural College. . . . 
Minnewaukan District High School. . 
Trolley Special School District No. 25. 

Sentinel Butte School 

Starkweather Public School 

Upham Public Schools 

State Normal School 

Van Hook Consolidated School 



Simplex. . . .'. 

Powers 6A 

do 

Powers 

De Vry and Powers 

Powers 

Motiograoh 

Simplex 

Powers No. 6 

Powers 6A 

Nicholas Powers Cameragraph. 
Edison Exhibition 



250 
500 
500 
136 
500 
250 
400 
300 
200 
300 
1,200 
200 



OHIO 



Akron 

Barberton 

Bellefontaine 

Bellevue 

Bowersville 

Brewster 

Cincinnati 

Do 

Do 

Cleveland 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Cleveland Heights 
Columbus 



Municipal University of Akron 

Barberton High School 

Bellefontaine High School and Elementary 

Bellevue High School 

Jefferson Centralized School 

Young Men's Christian Association 

Oakley School 

Academy of Notre Dame 

St. Xavier High School 

Central High School 

Case School of Applied Science 

East Technical High School 

High School of Commerce 

Holy Name School 

University School 

West Technical High School 

South High School 

Cleveland Heights High School 

Capital University... 



Royal 

Powers 6B 

Simplex 

School Projector 

Motiograph 

Simplex 

New Premier Pathescope 

Pathescope 

Powers 

Motiograph 

Powers No. 6 

(No name given) 

Simplex 

De Vry Projecting 

Pathescope 

Powers 

. ! . .do 

Powers 6A 

(No name given) 



500 
933 
900 
400 
400 
225 

1 .000 
51 H I 
800 

1.300 
.Mill 

1.400 
500 
350 
inn 

1,000 
050 
610 
800 



127 



Jesse D. Hampton 
Productions 



Blanche Sweet 
H. B. Warner 
William Desmond 

Eastern Office 

1013 Longacre Building, New York 
Howard E. Morton Manager 



128 



OHIO Continued 



C ity or town 



Institution 



Make of machine 



Strovers High School 

Parker First Year High School 

Steele High School 

St. John's School 

Fostoria Schools 

Denison University 

McClain High School 

Hamilton High School 

McArthur Huntsville School. . . . 

I.akewood High School 

LeRoy School , 

LeRoy Village School 

St. Rose School 

Garfeld School 

Washington Township School . . . 

Lincoln School 

Lorain High School 

Milford Public School 

Johnson St. Paris Public School. 
Fulton Township School 



Simplex 

Pathescope 

Simplex 

Edison 

Simplex 

(No name given). . . . 

Powers 

Powers 6 B 

Simplex 

Powers 6A 

Simplex 

. . . .do 

(No name given) 

Balopticon 

Simplex 1910 Model. 

Pathescope 

Powers 6B 

Edison 

(No name given) .... 
Pathescope 



OKLAHOMA 



Adair Public School 

Amber Consolidated School 

Ardmore High School 

Blair Public School 

Central State Normal School 

Webster School 

Fnid High School 

Glenpool Public School 

Helena School 

Jet Public Schools 

Lawton High School and Grade Schools 

Macomb Public Schools 

Milburn High School 

Muldrow High School 

Ponca City High School 

Ravia Public and High School 

Tulsa High School 



( No name given) 
Victor Animatograph 

Motiograph 

Simplex 

Powers 

(No name given 

Pathescope 

Edison Kinetoscope 
Powers Motiograph 

Powers 6A 

Pathescope 

Edison Kinetoscope.. 

Pathescope 

Powers 6A r 

Edison 

Pathescope 

Powers No. 6 



OREGON 



Ashland 

Astoria 

Estacada 

Eugene 

Do 

Gaston 

Hillsboro 

Hood River 
Island City. . . 

Klamath 

Monmouth 
North Powder 

Pendleton 

Portland 

Do 

The Dalles 

Wasco 



Junior High School 

Central School 

Estacada Public Schools 

Flxtension Division 

LJniversity of Oregon 

Gaston High and Public School 

Hillsboro Public Schools 

Hood River Public Schools 

Island City Schools 

Klamath County High School 

Oregon Normal School 

North Powder High School . . . 

Pendleton High School 

Reed College 

Immaculate Heart School 

Public High School 

Wasco Public Schools 



Bausch & Lomb 

Motiograph Model D 

Victor Animatograph 

(Several makes) 

Cameragraph Model No. 16 

Edison 

(No name given) 

Motiograph 

Enterprise 

Animatograph 

Motiograph 

Powers 6 A 

American Standard 

(No name given) 

Victor Animatograph Model 
No. 2. 

American Standard Motion-Pic- 
ture Machine. 
Motiograph 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Allentown . 

Do 

Do 

Ambridge. . . 
Annville. . . . 
Barnrsboro 

Beatty 

Beaver Falls 
Bellevue. . . . 
Bent ley ville 
Bloomsburg 

Do 



Junior High Schools 

Muhlenbert College 

Allentown High School 

Ambridge Borough Schools 

Lebanon Valley College 

Barnesboro Public Schools 

St. Vincent College 

Beaver Falls High School 

Bellevue High School 

Bcnlleyville Public and High School 

Bloomsburg High School 

Bloomsburg State Normal 



Powers 

Graphoscope 

Powers Cameragraph 

Pat he 

Graphoscope 

Acme. . . 

American Motion Picture No. 

Palhe F e r es 

Pa.heiope 

. . . .do 

,\ >... 

.1,, 



129 



WILLIAM C. DOWLAN 

Directed 

The Following Releases 

The Chorus Girl's Romance Viola Dana 

Dangerous to Men Viola Dana 

Locked Lips . . .Tsuri Aoki 

The Peddler of Lies Frank Mayo and Ora Carew 

Under Suspicion Ora Carew and Forrest Stanley 

Loot Ora Carew and Darrel Foss 

Cowardice Court Peggy Hyland 

Restless Souls Alma Reubens 

Irish Eyes Pauline Stark 

The Outsider Emmy Whelen 

And the Law Says Richard Bennett 

Youth's Endearing Charm Mary Miles Minter 

Address : 
1642 SHUMWAY AVE., 
HOLLYWOOD, CAL. Hollywood 3467 



130 



PENNSYLVANIA— Continued 



City or town 



Institution 



Make of machine 



Capacity 
of audi- 
torium 



Bolivar 

Braddock 

Brookville 

Brownsville. . . . 
Bryn Athyn. . . . 

California 

Canton 

Carlisle 

Do 

Carnegie 

Chester 

Conemaugh 

Connellsville. . . . 
Crafton 

Do 

Doylestown 

Duquesne 

Easton 

Emsworth 

Erie 

Erie 

Frackville 

Fredonia 

Grove City 

Harrisburg 

Do 

Harrison Valley . 
Hokendauqua. . . 

Jerome 

Lansdale 

Lansford 

Library 

Litits 

Loretto 

McKeesport 

Manayunk 

Mansfield 

Marion 

Millersville 

Munhall 

Nazareth 

Newmanstown. . 

North East 

Oil City 

Philadelphia 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Pittsburgh 

Plainfield 

Renova 

Reynosdriville. . . 

Ridgway 

Selingsgrove 

Sewickley 

Sharon 

Sharpsville 

Shillington 

Shippenburg. . . . 

Swarthmore 

Titusville 

Troy 

Verona 

Villanova 

Wayne 

Wilkesbarre 

Wilmarding 

Worcester 

York 



Bolivar Public Schools 

Braddock High School 

Brookville Public School 

Brownsville High School 

Academy of the New Church 

Southwestern State Normal 

Canton Borough Schools 

Carlisle High School 

Dickinson College 

Carnegie Public Schools 

Franklin School 

East Conemaugh Public Schools 

Connellsville High School 

Crafton Boro Public and High School. . . . 

Crafton High School 

Doylestown Public School 

Duquesne Public School 

St. Bernard's Parochial School 

Emsworth Public School 

Erie Normal School 

St. John Kauty College. 

Frackville Public Schools 

Fredonia Vocational School 

Grove City Public Schools 

Harrisburg Technical High 

Central High School 

Harrison High School 

School District Township of Whitehall . . . 

Young Mens Christian Association 

Lansdale Public Schools 

Lansford High School 

Bethel Vocational School 

Linden Hall Seminary 

St. Francis College 

Centennial School 

St. John the Baptist 

Mansfield S. and N. School 

Maser Misericordiae Academy 

Millersville State Normal School 

Munhall Public Schools 

Nazareth Hall Military Academy 

Millcreek High and District School 

St. Mary's College 

St. Joseph School 

Catholic Girls' High School 

Germantown Young Mens Christian Asso 
ciation. 

Girard College 

St. Joseph's College 

South Philadelphia High School for Girls. 

Temple University 

St. Paul's Cathedral School. - 

Plainfield Independent School 

Renova High School 

Reynosdriville Public School , 

Young Men's Christian Association 

Susquehanna University : 

Sewickley Public Schools 

Sharon High School 

Sharpsville Public Schools 

Shillington Public Schools 

Cumberland Valley Normal School 

Swarthmore Preparatory School 

St. Joseph's Academy 

Troy High School 

Verona Public and High School 

Villanova College 

Radnor High School 

Wilkesbarre High School 

Wilmarding Public School 

Worcester High School 

York High School 



Powers Cameragraph 

Pathe 

. . . .do 

Victor Animatograph 

Pathescope 

Premier Pathescope 

Powers 

Simplex 

Pathescope 

Pathe 

Pathescope 

Simplex 

Powers 

Powers 63 

Pathescope 

Powers 6A 

Pathescope 

Powers 

(Several kinds) 

Pathescope 

Cosmograph 

Pathescope 

do 

do 

. . . .do 

Edison 

Safety Cinema 

Powers 6B 

Pathescope 

Motiograph 1-1911 

Motiograph 

. . . .do 

Powers 6 

Thompson & Mcintosh. 

Simplex 

Powers 6B and Pathescope. 

Nicholas Powers Co 

(No name given, slides). . . . 

Powers A 

Pathescope 

Cameragraph 6A 

Powers Cameragraph 6A. . . 

Pathe 

(No name given) 

Powers 



Simplex Precision 

Powers 6 

Simplex 

Powers 

Powers 6 Cameragraph 

Victor Animatograph 

Powers 6 Cameragraph 

Pathescope 

do 

(No name given) 

Powers 6 Cameragraph 

Pathescope 

....do 

Balopticon 

Powers 6B 

Pathescope 

Powers 6 

Powers 

Pathescope 

Motiograph 1 

Atlas Motion Picture Projector. 

Victor Mooring Machine 

Powers 

Pathe 

Pathescope 



400 
50 
342 
500 
700 
500 
400 
150 
857 
350 
200 
903 
600 
559 
600 
825 
300 
500 
500 
150 
350 
300 
500 
1,004 
1,500 
300 
100 
225 
800 
900 
500 
500 
600 
700 
600 
1,000 
700 
1,000 
1,100 
200 
500 
275 
600 
800 
800 

2,400 
1,200 
1,600 
1,000 
500 
150 
532 
650 
225 
500 
400 
250 
125 
250 
600 
150 
325 
400 
666 
500 
300 
2,000 
650 
350 
1,000 



RHODE ISLAND 



East Providence A. P. Hoyt Grammar School Pathescope 600 

Kingston Rhode Island State College Powers 250 

Middletown St. George's School (No name given) 300 

Newport Coddington School Edison 400 



131 



JAMES YOUNG 

Directed the Following Releases 
Pictures That Live in Your Memory 

"OLIVER TWIST"-ALL STAR CAST 

Tully Marshall, Marie Doro, Hobart Bosworth 

"My Official Wife" 

"Hearts In Exile" 

"On Trial" — Initial First National Release 

, . /"The White Man's Law" 
Sessue Hayakawa in („ The Temple of Dusk „ 

"Sweet Kitty Bellairs" 
Mae Murray's greatest favorite 

Blanche Sweet in an incomparable comedy creation 
"Thousand Dollar Husband" 

"Missing" 
Nine Pictures Starring Earle Williams 
Katherine MacDonald in "Curtain" 

NORMA TALMADGE IN 
"A DAUGHTER OF TWO WORLDS" 



132 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



City or town 



Institution 



Make of machine 



Allendale 

Branchville 

Clemson College 

Columbia 

Fort Mill 

Hartsville 

Pacolet 

Rock Hill 

Orangeburg 

Seneca 



Allendale High School 

Branchville High School 

Clemson Agricultural College 

University of South Carolina 

Fort Mill Graded School 

Cake College 

Pa:olet Mills Voung Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. 

Winthrop Normal and Industrial College. 

Claflin University 

Seneca Institute 



Powers 6A 

Simplex 

Powers 6A 

Acme Portable. 
Motiograph IA 

Powers 

Powers 6B 

Edison 

Kineto 

Powers 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



Aberdeen . 
Brookings 
Dell Rapids 

Do 

Florence. . . . 
Mobridge . . 

Phillip 

Spearfish . . 



Northern Normal and Industrial School 

Brookings Public Schools 

Public School 

City Public Schools 

Florence Public School 

Mobridge Public School 

Phillip School 

Spearfish State Normal School 



( No name given) 

. . . .do 

Nicholas Powers 

Powers 

Powers 6A 

Bausch & Lomb Optical . 
Bausch & Lomb Model C 
Edison 



850 
500 
600 
700 
250 
100 
150 
600 



TENNESSEE 



Webb School 

City Schools 

King College 

Caplerville High School 

South Saint Elmo 

Union University 

East Tennessee State Normal School 

Castle Heights Military Academy 

Monroe County Central High School 

Maryville College 

Millington Central High School 

Morristown Normal and Industrial College 

Middle Tennessee Normal School 

Fisk University 

Agricultural and Industrial State Normal 
School. 

Peabody College Demonstration School . . . 

Martin College 

University of the South 



Powers 6B 

Powers 

Acme Portable 

Victor Animatograph 

Cosmograph 

Acme 

Acme Portable 

Kinetoscope 

Cosmograph 

Acme Portable 

Powers No. 6 

Edison 

Acme Portable 

Edison Kinetoscope.. 
Animatograph 

Safety Cinema 

Cosmograph 

Powers 6B 



400 
750 
300 
300 
400 
400 
800 
460 
400 
864 
600 
800 
1.000 
1 .500 
600 

900 
600 
400 



TEXAS 



Alpine Public School 

Grubbs Vocational College 

Austin High School 

West Texas State Normal College. 

Howard Payne College 

Carthage Public School 

Corpus Christi Public Schools 

State Orphan's Home School 

I. O. O. F. Home School 

Buekner Orphans Home 

Terrill School 

College of Industrial Arts 

Beall School 

Rockwall Public Schools 

Masonic Home. * 

Grand Saline Public School 

Sherman School 

Gibbons High School 

Franklin School 

Prairie View State Normal School. 

Roscoe School 

St. Louis College 

Teague High School 

Victoria Public School 

Yorlctown Schools 



Victor Animatograph. . . . 

Powers Zenith 

Standard No. 4 

Powers Cameragraph 

Motiograph No. 1 

Simplex 

New Zenith 

Powers No. 6 

Motiograph Model No. 1 

Powers B3 

Zenith 

Motiograph 

Edison Kinetoscope 

Powers 6B 

Edison 

B nis :h & Lomb 

(No nime given) 

Powers No. 6 

Powers 

Motiograph 

(No name given) 

Powers 

Keystone 

Powers 6A 

Zenith 



590 
400 
800 

1.056 
400 
500 
625 
500 

1,000 
800 
200 

1 ,200 
13.-. 
350 
600 
.Mill 
250 
500 
800 

1.000 
300 
401) 
250 
700 
450 



ANN MAY 

RECENT RELEASES 

"PARIS GREEN" and "PEACEFUL VALLEY" 
With Charles Ray 
Re-engaged by Lasky to appear in an important 
part in Cecil B. De Mille's latest production 

( Title to be Announced) 



134 



UTAH 



City or town 



Institution 



M;ike of machine 



Capacity 
of audi- 
torium 



Bingham 

Castle Dale . 
Minersville. . . . 
Salt Lake City 
Do 



Bingham Central Schools 

Emery State Academy 

Minersville Public and High School 

University of Utah 

Granite School District 



(No name given) 

. . . .do 

Powers 5A 

Portoscope and De Vry. 
Powers Cameragraph. . . 



200 
300 
150 
750 

SOU 



VERMONT 



Brandon 

Northfield 

South Royalton 



Brandon High School 
Norwich University . . 
High School 



Simplex 

Simplex. 1917 Model 
Powers 6A 



350 
400 
250 



VIRGINIA 



Alexandria. . . 

Ashland 

Blacksburg . . 

Bristol 

East Radford. 
Fort Defiance 
Fort Monroe. 
Hampton. . . . 
Harrisonburg. 
Konnarock. . . 

Norfolk 

Petersburg 

Richmond 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Tangier 

Victoria 

Williamsburg. 



Episcopal High School 

Randolph-Macon College 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Washington School 

Radford State Normal School 

Augusta Military Academy 

Coast Artillery School 

Hampton Institute 

State Normal School 

Konnarock High and Grammar School 

Robert E. Lee School 

Petersburg High School 

Rinford Junior High School 

St. Patrick's Boys' School 

John Marshall High School 

John Marshall Night High School 

Tangier School 

Victoria High School 

College of William and Mary 



Graphsoscope 

Edison 

Simplex 

Reflectoscope 

Simplex Projector 

Powers Cameragraph No. 6A 

Simplex 

Powers 6A 

Simplex 

Simplex No. 2579 

Pathescope 

Powers 6 A 

Simplex 

Premier Pathescope 

Simplex 

....do 

Crone 

Edison 

Graphoscope Junior 



200 
400 
600 
1.200 
1.200 
600 
500 
2.200 
400 
350 
100 
1,078 
1.000 
450 
1,400 
1,200 
No room 
250 
250 



WASHINGTON 



Bellingham. . 

Do 

Bothell 

Creston 

Dryal 

Lacey 

Pullman . . . 
Richland 

Ruston 

Seattle 

Tacoma ... 

Do 

Vera 

Walla Walla 

Wapato 

Yehn 



State Normal School 

Franklin , 

Bothell Public School 

Creston High School 

Dryal High School 

St. Martins College 

State College of Washington .... 
Richland Schools, District No. 6. 

(No name given) 

Green Lake School 

Lyon School 

Academy of the Visitation 

Vera High School 

Baker School 

Wapato High School 

Yehn Schools, District No. 301. . 



Powers 6B , 

Pathescope , 

Cameragraph 

Powers A 

Monarch 

Motiograph 

Powers 6B 

Edison Kinetoscope. . 

Powers No. 5 

Powers 6A 

Pathescope 

. . . .do 

Edison Kinetoscope. . . 

Pathescope 

De Vry 

Victor Animatograph. 



900 
100 
550 
200 
150 
300 
1,200 
350 
125 
250 
160 
500 
250 
50 
280 
200 



WEST VIRGINIA 



Bluefield 

Bramwell 

Buckhannon .... 

Chester 

Elkins 

Elk Garden 

Fairmont 

Do 

Gaf Mills 

Gary 

Grafton 

Do 

Harpers Ferry. . . 

Hundred 

Huntington 

Littleton 

Mannington 

Marlinton 

New Cumberland 

Richwood 

Shepherdstown. . . 
Webster Springs. . 

Weston 

Williamsburg 



Bluefield Colored Institute 

Bramwell Public Schools 

West Virginia Wesleyan College 

Independent School District 

Elkins High School 

Elk District High School and Rural School 

B. L. Butcher School 

Fairmont High School 

Gaf Mills High School 

Gary Consolidated School 

Grafton High School 

West Grafton School 

Harpers Ferry District High School 

Church District Schools 

Huntington High School 

Clay District High School 

Mannington 

Edray District High School 

New Cumberland School 

Richwood Schools 

Shepherd College State Normal School . . 

Webster Springs Public Schools 

Weston Schools 

Williamsburg School. . 



Pathescope 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

. . . .do 

....do 

Powers A 

. . . .do 

Pathescope 

K. O. K. Pathescope. 

Pathescope 

De Vry : 

Balopticon 

K. O. K 

Powers 6B 

Pathescope 

Premier Pathescope. . 

Pathescope 

. . . .do 

(No name given) 

Powers 6A 

Pathescope 

. . . .do 

Edison Style B 



500 
486 

1,000 
200 
613 
275 
800 
600 
350 
500 
650 
600 
350 
500 

1,200 
300 
600 
350 
150 

1.100 
250 
300 
800 
150 



135 



PHILIP ROSEN 

Director 



Recent Releases 

THE ROAD TO DIVORCE" 
with Mary MacLaren 

"ARE ALL MEN ALIKE?" 
with May Allison 

"WHITE ASHES" 
All Star Cast 



In Production 

"THE OFF SHORE PIRATE' 
with May Allison 



ADDRESS: METRO PACIFIC COAST STUDIOS 



136 



WISCONSIN 



City or town 



Almond. 

Antigo 

Ashland 

Do 

Barron 

Beaver Dam 

Belleville 

Belmont 

Belvoir 

Berlin 

Black Earth 

Blanchardville 

Bloomington 

Brillion 

Brooklyn 

Cheyenne 

Colfax. .• 

Columbus 

Delafield 

Eau Claire 

East Troy 

Fairchild 

Florence 

Fort Atkinson 

Frederic 

Gillette -. 

Galesville 

Grafton 

Hancock 

Horicon 

La Crosse 

Lancaster 

Laona 

Manitowoc 

Mattoon 

Menomonie 

Merrill \ , 

Milwaukee 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Minocqua 

Mishicot 

Montello 

Mosinee 

Mount Calvary 

Onalaska \\ 

Osceola 

Oshkosh 

Osseo. . . . 

Plainfield 

Platteville \\ 

Prairie du Chien 

Princeton 

Racine 

Randolph \\\ 

Roberts 

Ripon 

Shawano 

Stratford 

St. Francis , , 

Sliocton 

Sloughton 

Spring Valley 

Superior , ] 

Thorp 

Tennimone 

Village of St. Croix Fall's 

Waterford 

Waterboro 

Wauwatosa 

Wausau 

Do ' " 

West Allis 

Do 

West Bend 

W'est Depre 

Weyauwega " 

Whitewater 

Williams Bay 

Withee 

Douglas 



Institution 



Almond High School 

City Schools 

Ashland High School 

Northland College 

Barron High School 

(No name given) 

Belleville High School 

Belmont High School 

Belvoir High School 

Green Lake County Training School. . . . 

Black Earth Public School 

Blanchardville High School 

Bloomington High School 

Brillion High School 

Brooklyn High School 

Academy of the Holy Child Jesus 

District No. 3 

Columbia County Normal 

St. John's Military Academy 

County Training School for Teachers 

East Troy 

Fairchild Public Schools 

Florence High School 

Fort Atkinson Schools 

Frederic High School 

Gillette Public Schools 

Public Schools 

Grafton High School 

Hancock High School 

Horicon Public Schools 

La Crosse State Normal School 

Lancaster Public Schools 

Laona High School 

Vocational School 

Mattoon State Graded and High School. 

Dunn County Training School 

Merrill High School 

N. Division High School 

Riverside High School 

Milwaukee State Normal School 

St. Mary's Academy 

Minocqua High School 

Mishicot High School 

Montello High School 

Mosinee Public Schools 

St. Lawrence College 

Onalaska High School 

Osceola High School 

Longfellow School 

Osseo High School 

High School 

State Normal School 

St. Mary's Cellege 

Princeton High School 

Racine High School 

Randolph Public Schools 

Union High School 

Ripon Public Schools 

Shawano High School 

Stratford High School 

Catholic Normal School 

Union Free High School 

Sloughton Public Schools 

Spring Valley High School 

Superior State Normal School 

Thorp Schools 

Tennimone High School 

Public School 

Waterford High School 

Waterboro Public Schools 

Wauwatosa High School 

Wausau High School 

Vocational School 

McKinley 

High School 

West Bend Public Schools 

St. Norbert's College 

Weyauwega Hieh School 

State Normal School 

Public School 

Withee School 



Make of machine 



Victor Animatograph 
Motiograph 

. do 



PoweiS No. 5 

Edison Kinetoscope 

Cameragraph OA 

(No name given) 

Edison Kinetoscope 

Powers 6A 

Portoscope 

Motiograph. . 

Badger 

(No name given) 

Edison Head 

Edison 

Powers No. (5 

Motiograph 

American Projectoscope 

Motiograph . . 

Safety Proiector 

Efficiency 

Badger 

. . . do 

Edison Kinetoscope 

Motiograph 

Powers 

Badger 

Motiograph 

Edison 

. . . .do 

Powers 6A 

Edison 

Edison Standard 

Improved Motiograph. 

Edison 

Powers Cameragraph 

Motiograph 

Simplex 

Powers 6A 

Motiograph 

Victor Animatograph. . 

Edison 

Motiograph Model 1908 

Edison Model D 

(No name given) 

Peerless. 

Badger 

Edison 

Vinascope 

Badger ■ 

Edison Model D 

Simplex 

Motiograph No. 1 

Animatograph 

Peerless 

Motiograph 

. . . .do 

Powers 

Powers No. 6A 

Badger 

Victor Animatograph. . . . 

Motiograph 

Edison 

(None given) 

Simplex 

Badger 

Powers 

(No name given) 

Keystone 

Badger , 

Simplex. 

Motiograph 

American Projectoscope . 

Vitroscope. 

Veriscope 

Edison Model D 

Powers 6A 

Edison Kinetoscope. 

Motiograph 

. . . .do 

( No name given) 



WYOMING 



Douglas Public School 



Powers 5A 



137 



ESTEE STUDIO 
AND LAB., Inc. 

E. SPITZ 
President 



Studio at 
209-219 East 124th Street 

Telephone Harlem 7196 

Studio at 
361-363 West 125th Street 

Telephone Morningside 4985 



138 



Leading Distributors Exchange Addresses 



FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

Boston — H. J. Krause, 8 Shawmut St. 

Portland — Wm. O'Brien, 85 Market St. 

New Haven— Frank J. Scully, 132 Meadow St. 

Harry Asher, District Manager. 
New Y° rk Citv — H. H. Buxbaum, 729 7th Ave. 
Buffalo— Allan S. Moritz, 145 Franklin St. 
Albany — Jos. H. Seidelman, 33 Orange St. 
Philadelphia — J. D. Clark, 1219 Vine St. 
Washington — Lester Rosenthal, 421 10th St., N.W. 

VV. E. Smith, District Manager. 
Pittsburgh— E. M. Stuve, 1018 Forbes St. 
Cincinnati — Fred Strief, Pioneer and Broadway. 
Cleveland — Herbert E. Elder, 811 Prospect Ave. 
Detroit— C. \V. Perry, 63 Elizabeth St. 

H. P. Wolfberg, Spec. Rep. 
Chicago— R. E. Bradford, 845 So. Wabash Ave. 
Minneapolis — J. W. Hicks, Jr., 608 1st Ave., N. 
_ Fred Cresswell, Spec. Rep. 
Kansas City — Joseph H. Gilday, 2024 Broadway. 
St. Louis— G. E. Akers. 3929 Olive St. 
Des Moines — R. C. Li Beau, 415 W. 8th St. 
Omaha— Paul J. Swift, 208 S. 13th St. 

M. H. Lewis, Spec. Rep. 
Atlanta— T. E. Simpson, Tr., 51 Luckie St. 
New Orleans— H. F. Wilkes, 814 Perdido St. 
Dallas — J- P. Corbin, 1902 Commerce St. 
Oklahoma City— Leslie Wilkes. 128 W. 3rd St. 
Charlotte— David Prince, 28 W. 4th St. 

W. J. Pratt, Epec. Rep., New Orleans and 
Charlotte. 

L. L. Dent, Spec. Rep., Dallas and Oklahoma 
City. 

Salt Lake City— F. B. McCracken, 133 E. 2d So. 
St. 

Denver— M. H. Colin, 1747 Welton St. 
Louis Marcus, Dist. Mgr. 

San Francisco — H. G. Rosebaum, 821 Market St. 

Los Angeles— H. B. Gallance, 112 W. 9th St. 

Seattle— G. P. Endert, 2017 3rd Ave. 

Portland— 14_N. 9th St. 

Atlanta, New Orleans, Dallas, Oklahoma City 
and Charlotte exchanges under name of 
Southern Enterprises, Inc. (S. A. Lynch). 

All Canadian Offices are Famous-Lasky Film 
Service, Ltd. 

Toronto — 206 Victoria St., G. Knox Haddow. 

Montreal— 6 McGill College Ave., E. English. 

St. John— 8 Mill St., White Bldg.. E. Rosecan. 

Winnipeg — 221 McDermott Ave., Aikins Bldg., R. 
H. Ramsey. 

Calgary— 310 8th Ave., Princess Theater Bldg., 

M. A. Milligen. 
Vancouver — 61 Central Bldg., 553 Granville St., 

Wm. Hanscher. 
Home Office — Toronto, 308 Victoria St., Geo. W. 
Weeks. Mgr. ; W. A. Bach. Asst. 

ASSO. FIRST NAT. PICT, INC. 

Denver — J. H. Ashbv, 1732 Welton St. 

St. Louis— S. J. Baker, 617 North Grand Ave. 

St. John, Can. — M. Bernstein. Regal Films, Ltd., ' 

167 Prince William St. 
At!anta--C. R. Beacham. 146 Marietta St 
Los Angeles — D. Bershon, 634 H. W. Hellman 

Bldp. 

Oklahoma City — J. A. Brainard, 127 So. Hudson 
St. 

New Orleans— C. J. Briant. 1401 Tulane Ave. 
Ottawa, Can. — Henrv Brouse. Imperial Theater 
Bldg. _ 

Indianapolis — Floyd Brown. 24 \\ . Washington St, 
Minneapolis — J. P. Cubberley, 409 Loeb Arcade 
Bldg. 

Washington, D. C. — Bovd Cunningham, 916 G 
St.. N. W. 

Vancouver, B. C— W. P. Dewees. 1318 Standard 
Bank Bldg. 

San Francisco — S. Y. Edwards, 146 Golden Gale 
Ave. 

New Jersey — A. M. Fabian, 729 7th Ave., New 
York. 

Montreal, Can. — A. J. Ferte. Regal Films, Ltd., 

31 McGill College Ave. 
Seattle— F. V. Fisher. 2023 Third Ave. 
Milwaukee— H. J. Fitzgerald. 402 Toy Bldg. 
Louisville — Lee L. Goldberg. National Theater 

Bldg. 

Cincinnati — R. H .Haines. Broadway Film Bldg. 
Salt Lake City— L. L. Hall. 60 Exchange Place. 

139 



Philadelphia— W. T. Heenan, 1339 Vine St. 
New Haven— M. H. Kelcher, 126 Meadow St. 
Omaha— C. E. Solah, 314 So. 13th St. 
New York City— Joseph Klein, 729 7th Ave. 
Cleveland— W. E. Lusk, 3648 Euclid Ave. 
Kansas City— E. C. Rhoden. 3l7 Floyd Bldg. 
Toronto. Can.— W. J. Reid, Regal Films, Ltd., 21 

Adelaide St. 
Boston — Thomas B. Spry, 7-9 Isabella St. 
Detroit — Harry Scott, 63 East Elizabeth St. 
Chicago— R. C. Seery, 110 So. State St. 
Richmond — Carl Senning, 901 E. Broad St. 
Pittsburgh — Joseph Skirboll, 414 Ferry St. 
Buffalo— S. W. Smith, 215 Franklin St. 
Des Moines — S. S. Schwarz, 326 Iowa Bldg. 

METRO PICT. CORP. 

Atlanta — C. E. Kessnich, 146 Marietta St. 
Buffalo— H. W. Kahn, 259-261 Franklin St. 
Boston— E. A. Golden, 60 Church St. 
Chicago — J. S. Graumen, 5 So. Wabash Ave. 
Cincinnati — W. W. Rowland, 7th and Main Sts. 
Cleveland— C. Ti. Almy, 410 Standard Thea. Bldg. 
Dallas— L. Bickel. 1924 Main St. 
Detroit— C. H. Townsend, 51 Elizabeth St., E. 
Denver— F. P. Brown, 1721 California St. 
Kansas City — S. L. Haldeman, 17th and Main Sts. 
Los Angeles— B. F. Rosenberg, 820 S. Olive St. 
Minneapolis — A. H. Fischer, 818 Prod. Exchange. 
New York City— T. J. Conners, 729 7th Ave. 
New Orleans — C. L Briant, 1401 Tulane Ave. 
Omaha— S. Maclntyre, 211 So. 13th St. 
Pittsburgh— J. E. Davis, 1018 Forbes St. 
Philadelphia— R. Lvnch. 1321 Vine St. 
Seattle— Carl Stearn. 2002 Third Ave. 
San Francisco — F. W. Voigt, 55 Jones St. 
Salt Lake City— G. L. Cloward, 20 Post Office PI. 
St. Louis— Chas. Werner. 3313a Olive St. 
Washington, D. C— G. W. Fuller, 916 G St., N.W. 
Toronto, Can. — N. N. Nathanson, 21 Adelaide St., 
W. 

REALART PICT. CORP. 

Atlanta — Joseph L. Marentette. 146 Marietta St. 
Boston — Walter R. Scates. 5 Isabella St. 
Buffalo— Harry E. Lotz, 221 Franklin St. 
Chicago— Harry W. Willard. 207 So. Wabash Av. 
Cincinnati — Mark Goldman, Film Exchange Bldg., 

Pioneer and Broadway. 
Cleveland — James B. Reilly — Room 200, Bangor 

Bldg.. 942 Prospect Ave., E. 
Dallas— Diaz Callahan, 190 9Commerce St. 
Denver — Bert R. Latz, 1742 Glenarm St. 
Detroit— Ralph B. Quive, 303 Joseph Mack Bldg. 
Kansas Citv- — Tohn N. MacMeekin, Film Exch. 

Bldg.. 17th and Main Sts. 
Los Angeles— Oren F. Woody, 922 So. Olive St. 
Minneapolis — Harry L. Hollander, Room 801. 

Produce Exchange Bldg. 
New Orleans — Truly B. Wildman, Saenger Bldg.. 

Tulane and Liberty Sts. 
New York City— Lester W. Adler, 130 W. 46th St. 
Omaha — C. G. Kingsley, 1216 Farnam St. 
Philadelphia — No apnointment yet, 253 N. 13th St. 
Pittsburgh — Henry E. Wilkinson, 1018 Forbes St. 
St. Louis— Floyd H. Lewis, 3626 Olive St. 
Seattle— Albert W. Eden, 2012 Third Ave. 
San Francisco — Ben F. Simpson. 985 Market St. 
Washington. D. C— Louis Reichert, 806-820 Ma- 
ther Bldg., 916 G St., N. W. 

HALLMARK PICT. CORP. 
Boston — R. A. Bertschy, 48 Melrose St. 
Buffalo — F. D. Lawlor, 257 Franklin St. 
Chicago— D. M. Vandawalker, 5 So. Wabash St. 
Cincinnati — T. M. Tohnston, 215 E. 5th St. 
Cleveland— R. W. Myerson. 2163 E. 9th St. 
Denver— L. T. Fidler, 1435 Champa St. 
Detroit— G. W. Thompson, 55 E. Elizabeth St. 
Kansas City — T. E. Foland, Ozark Bldg. 
Los Angeles— R. H. Allan, 643 S. Olive St. 
Milwaukee— F. C. Hensler. 506 Toy Bldg. 
Minneapolis — A. L. Zacherl, 16 N. 4th St. 
New Haven — M. H. Rabanus, 130 Meadow St. 
New York City — P. E. Mever, 1457 Broadway. 
Philadelphia— R. A. Daniels, S. E. cor. 13th and 

Vine Sts. 

Pittsburgh— C. C. McKibbin, 414 Penn Ave. 
San Francisco — S. S. Edwards. Jr., 86 Golden 

Seattle^C. C. Thompson. 2010 3rd Ave. 

Salt Lake City— A. J. Van Gorder, 50 Exch. PI. 



(romaine (f RF j) fielding) 



HILLFIELD, Inc. 



PRESENTS 



ROMAINE FIELDING 

in Selected — Powerful — Photoplay Classics 



CO-STARRING 



NAOMI VANDERBILT 

The Beautiful Young Daughter of one of 
America's Foremost Families 



Miss Vanderbilt's natural talent as an amateur 
singer of Grand Opera and portrayer of heavy 
dramatic roles has startled Society — Observe her! 



Producing for the open market 

J} DDR ESS 

HILLFIELD, Inc. 

New York City 
Suite 1 005 220 West 42nd Street 



140 



St. Louis— H. E. Boswell, 3318 Lindell Blvd 
\\ ashington, D. C— W. A. Busch, 916 G St 
N . W. 

Atlanta, Dallas, New Orleans, George N. Mont- 
gomery, General Sales Manager. 

FOX FILM CORP. 

District Managers 

Harry F,. Campbell, New England. 

Clayton P. Sheehan, Eastern. 

E H. Wachter, Southwestern. 

Howard J. Sheehan, Pacific Coast. 

George A. Allison, Southern. 

Vincent McCabe, Canadian. 
Atlanta — 111 Walton St., George Allison. 
Boston— 54 Piedmont St., H. F. Campbell. 
Buffalo— 209 Franklin St., M. H. Greenwald. 
Chicago— 845 St. Wabash Ave., C. W. Eckhardt. 
Cincinnati — 514 Elm St., Rudolph Knoepfle. 
Cleveland — 750 Prospect Ave., William Shapiro. 
Dallas — 19907 Commerce St., I. E. Harrington. 
Denver — 1422 Welton St., Joseph Kaliski. 
Indianapolis — 232 N. Illinois St., C. E. Penrod. 
Kansas Citj — 928 Main St., E. H. Wachter. 
Los Angeles— 734 S. Olive St., B. E. Loper. 
Minneapolis— 608 First Ave. N., M. J. Weinfeldt. 
New Orleans— 725 Poydras St., B. L. Dudenhefer. 
New York— 130 W. 46th St., Louis Rosenbluh. 
Omaha- -1413-15 Harnery St., Sidney Meyer. 
Philadelphia — 1315 Vine -St., George Dembow. 
Pittsburgh — 121 Fourth Ave., L. Burnstein. 
San Francisco — 243 Golden Gate Ave., F. H 
Butler. 

Seattle — 2006 Third Ave., Lester Sturm. 
St. Louis— 2632 Olive St., George E. McKean. 
Salt Lake City— 46 Exchange PI., Clyde A. 
Walker. 

Washington — 305 Ninth St., N. W., Paul E. 
Krieger. 

Canada 

Montreal — 322 St. Catherine St., W., Maurice 
West. 

Toronto — 21 Dundas St., E., I. M. Devaney. 
St. John— 162 Union St., H. Nelson Hooper. 
Calgary — Princess Theater Bldg., Jos. Lieberman. 
Winnipeg — 48 Aikins Bldg., William S. Jones. 
Vancouver — Leith Spencer Bldg., R. A. Scott. 

SELECT PICTURES CORP. 

Albany — 679 Broadway, Chas. Walder. 
Atlanta— Hirsh Bldg., 148 Marietta St., W. R. 
Liebman. 

Boston — 78 Broadway, Benj. P. Rogers. 

Buffalo— 176 Franklin St., A. W. Moses. 

Chicago— 207 S. Wabash Ave., B. W. Beadel. 

Cincinnati — Pioner St. and B'way, J. A. Conant. 

Cleveland — 750 Prospect Ave., G. A. Erdman. 

Dallas— 1913^ Commerce St., C. C. Ezell. 

Denver— 1728 Welton St., B. S. Cohen. 

Detroit— 63 E. Elizabeth St., J. O. Kent. 

Indianapolis — 66 W. New York St., Samuel Sax. 

Kansas City — 17th and Main Sts., G. C. Reid. 

Los Angeles— 818 So. Olive St., H. C. Cohen. 

Minneapolis — Produce Exch. Bldg., E. C. Feilder. 

New Haven — 19 Portsea St., Morris Safier. 

New Orleans — 1006 Gravier St., J. F. Flarity. 

New York— 126 W. 46th St., Henry Siegel, Dis- 
trict Manager. 

Omaha— 1411 Harney St., C. W. Taylor. 

Philadelphia— 1308 Vine St., M. Milder. 

Pittsburgh — 1201 Liberty Ave., Leo F. Levison. 

St. Louis— 3617 Washington Ave., W. G. Carter. 

Salt Lake City— 160 Regent St., T. C. Malcolm. 

San Francisco — 104 Golden Gate Ave., Harry 
Goldberg. 

Seattle— 2024 Third Ave., Hugh Rennie. 
Washington— 525 13th St., N. W., Wm. A. V. 
Mack. 

V. P. Whitaker, West Coast Representative, Los 
Angeles. 

C. G. Ezell, Southern Division Manager, Dallas. 

Select (Canadian Corp.) 

13-15 Adelaide St., W., Toronto, Ont. 
Phil Kauffman, Managing Director. 
"Calgary — Elma Block, R. E. Kissock. 
Montreal— Orpheum Theater Bldg., 289 St. Cath- 
erine St., W., Earl W. Kramer. 
St. John— 167 Prince William St., W. C. McNor- 
gan. 

Toronto— 13-15 Adelaide St., W., W. A. Kent. 
"Vancouver — 42 Leigh-Spencer Bldg., T. W. 
Bailey. 

Winnipeg Phoenix Block, Dan Freeman, Spec. 
< Canadian Representative. 



"Under supervision of Mr. DWan Freeman,- 
Winnipeg. 

Select (French Corp.) 

Jean Rosen, 43 Rue La Bruyere, Paris Ex- 
change 8, Avenue De Clichy. Branches will be 
established at The Hague, Holland; Brussels, Bel- 
gium ; Lille, Paris, Strasbourg, Als. ; Bordeaux, 
Lyon and Marseilles, France; Madrid and Bar- 
celona, Spain; Milan, Venice and Rome, Italy, 
and Geneva, Switzerland. 

Select (Australian Corp.) 

Temporary office, Record Chambers, 77 Castle- 
reagh St. 

D. J. Selznick, Managing Director; John Corbett 
Jones, General Manager. 

ROBERTSON-COLE CO. 

Albany — 733 Broadway, J. M. Flynn. 
Atlanta — 146 Marietta St., R. A. Davis. 
Boston— 39 Church St., M. E. Morey. 
Buffalo— 215 Franklin St., E. W. Crane. 
Chicago — Consumers Bldg., Max Levey. 
Cincinnati — Broadway Film Bldg., Chas. Casa- 
nave. 

Cleveland — 750 Prospect Ae., A. C. Lebensburger. 
Dallas— 1807 Main St., P. K. Johnston. 
Denver— 1724 Welton St., J. S. Nelson. 
Detroit— Eliz. and John R. Sts., R. J. Churchill. 
Indianapolis— 111 W. Maryland St., C. W. Tyler. 
Kansas City— Ozark Bldg., 928 Main St., R. E. 
Churchill. 

Los Angeles — 825 S. Olive St., A. R. Patten. 
Milwaukee — 301 Enterprise Bldg., Louis Klar. 
Minneapolis — 309 Loeb Arcade Bldg., I. F. 
Mantzke. 

New Orleans — 816 Pordido St., J. B. Dumestre, 
Jr. 

New- York — 1600 Broadway. J. Safron. 
Oklahoma City— 7 S. Walker St., A. H. Mc- 
Loughlin. 

Omaha — 1306 Farnum St., C. L. Peavey. 
Philadelphia— 1219 Vine St., J. F. Gill. 
Pittsburgh — 121 Fourth Ave., Geo. Moore. 
San Francisco — 177 Golden Gate Ave., W. A. 
Crank. 

St. Louis — 3623 Washington Ave., Joe Desberger. 
Seattle— 19933 Third Ave., L. Wingham. 
Washington — 916 G St., N. W., M. A. Levy. 

UNITED ARTISTS PICT. CORP. 

Atlanta — M. C. Coyne, 146 Marietta St. 
Boston — W. H. Jenner, 41 Winchester Ave. 
Chicago— C. E. Smith, 17 N. Wabash Ave. 
Cleveland — R. K. Evans, 2143 Prospect Ave. 
Dallas— J. E. Luckett, 1930 Main St. 
Denver— T. Y. Henry, 617 19th St. 
Detroit — B. A. Lucas, 605 Toseph Mack Bldg. 
Kansas City — H. D. Buckley, 17th and Main Sts. 
Los Angeles— W. S. Rand, 643 S. Olive St. 
Minneapolis — J. F. Brett, 402 Film Exch. Bldg. 
New York— J. Von Tilzer, 729 7th Ave. 
Philadelphia— C. S. Trowbridge, 1319 Vine St. 
Pittsburgh — C. E. Moore, 414 Ferry St. 
San Francisco — E. B. Baron, 100 Golden Gate Av. 
Seattle— C. W. Harden, 1913 Third Ave. 
Washington — G. W. Lenehan, 801 Mather Bldg. 
Toronto — A. C. Berman, 123 Bay St. 

UNIVERSAL FILM CO. 

Atlanta — 111 Walton St., Consolidated F. & S. 

Co., Wm. Oldknow. 
Baltimore — 412 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore F. 

Ex., P. Oletsky. 
Boston — 60 Church St., American F. F. Co., E. 

A. Golden. 

Buffalo— 35 Church St., Universal F. Ex., M. A. 
Chase. 

Butte — 23 So. Montana St., Universal F. Ex., 

Herman Lerch. 
Charlotte— 307 W. Trade St., Universal F. Ex., 

E. F. Dardine. 

Chicago — 220 So. State St., Universal F. Ex.. 

I. L. Lesserman. 
Cincinnati — Film Exch. Bldg., Pioneer and B'way, 

Universal F. Ex., Cleve Adams. 
Cleveland — Prospect Ave. and Huron, Universal 

F. Ex., E. J. Smith. 

Dallas — 1900 Commerce St., Consolidated F. & S. 
Co., N. E. Depinet. 

Denver — 1422 Welton St.. Universal F. Ex., Eu- 
gene Gerbase. 

Des Moines — 918 Locust St., Universal F. Ex., 
Edgar II. Haines. 

Detroit 63 10. Elizabeth St., Universal F. Ex., 
W. 1). Ward. 



PAUL POWELL 

Directed 
Mary Pickford in "Pollyanna" 

It 

Recent Releases 
"CROOKED STREETS" with Ethel Clayton 
"SWEET LAVENDER" withMaryMilesMinter 



Address: Famous-Players-Lasky-Studios 
Hollywood, California 



142 



El P t ? so r~ 110 E - FranH'n St., Consolidated F. & 

S. Co., R. C. Mcllheran. 
Indianapolis— 113 W. Georgia St., Universal F. 

Ex., Ralph W. Abbett. 
Jacksonville— 615 }4 W. Forsythe St., Consolidated 

F. & S. Co., John R. Barton. 
Kansas City— Film Exch. Bldg., Main and 17th 

Sts., Universal F. Ex., J. H. Calvert. 
Los Angeles— 822 S. Olive St., Universal F. Ex., 

C. L. Theuerkauf. 
Memphis— 226 Union Ave., Consolidated F & S 

Co., W. E. Sipe. 
Milwaukee— 174 2nd St., Universal F. Ex., Geo 

Levine. 

Minneapolis— 719 Hennepin Ave., Universal F 

Ex., J. D. Roderick. 
New Haven — 126 Meadow St., Big U Film Ex 

Morris Joseph. 
New Orleans— 914 Gravier St., Consolidated F. & 

S. Co., W. M. Richards. 
New York — 1600 Broadway, 7th Floor. Big U 

Film Ex., Chas. Rosenzweig, Geo. Uffner 
Oklahoma City — 116 W. 2nd St., Universal F. 

Ex., Sam Benjamin. 
Omaha — 1304 Farnum St., Universal F. Ex., H 

F. Lefholtz. 

Philadelphia— 1304 Vine St., Fairmount F. F. Ex 

V. R. Carrick. 
Pittsburgh— 1018 Forbes St., Universal F. Ex., 

Herman Stern. 
Portland — 405 Davis St., Universal F. Ex., C. W. 

Koerner. 

St. Louis — 2116 Locust St., Universal F. Ex., 

Barney Rosenthal. 
Salt Lake — 56 Exchange PI., Universal F. Ex., 

G. A. Hager. 

San Francisco — 121 Golden Gate Ave., Universal 

F. Ex., C. A. Nathan. 

Seattle — 215 Virginia St., Universal F. Ex., V. 

M. Schubach. 
Spokane — 10 So. Banard St., Universal F. Ex 

Wallace Potter. 
Sioux Falls — Colonial Theater Bldg., Universal F 

Ex., S. W. Fitch. 
Toronto, Can. — 106 Richmond St., W., Canadian 

Universal F. Co., Clair Hague. 
Washington, D. C— 307 Ninth St., N. W., Wash- 
ington F. Ex., H. C. Wales. 
Calgary, Can.— 407 W. 8th Ave., Can. Univ. F. 

Co., D. G. Walkley. 
Montreal, Can.— 295 St. Catherine St., W., Can. 

Univ. F. Co., D. Leduc. 
St. John, Can.— 87 Union St., Can. Univ. F. Co., 

G. W. Margetts. 

Vancouver, B. C— 553 Granville St., Can. Univ 

F. Co., W. Walkley. 
Winnipeg, Man. — 40 Aikens Bldg., Can. Univ. F 

Co., J. A. Wilson. 
Charleston— 707 Dryden St., Univ. Film Ex., 

F. W. Barlett. 
Columbus— 294 N. High St., Univ. Film Ex., 

M. H. Melchior. 
Ft. Smith— 709 Rogers Ave., Univ. Film. Ex., 

T. W. Sharp. 
Wilkesbarre— 61 S. Penn Aye., Exhib. Film Ex.. 

W. H. Devonshire. 
Wichita— 209 E. 1st St., Univ. Film Ex., H. H. 

Buntley. 

W. W. HODKINSON CORP. 

Albany— H. E. Thompson, 35-37. Orange St. 
Atlanta— Theo. C. Holland, 111 Walton St. 
Buffalo — John C. Predari, 218 Franklin St. 
Boston — W. H. Dunbar, 13 Stanhope St. 
Charlotte— Thomas Little, 235 S. Tryon St. 
Chicago — F. W. Seymour, 220 S. State St. 
Cincinnati— H. H. Hum, 124 E. 17th St. 
Cleveland — Herbert J. Ochs, 750 Prospect Ave. 
Dallas— Jack Schaeffer, 1715 Commerce St. 
Denver — J. Krum, 1436 Welton St. 
Des Moines— C. D. Hill, 10054 E. Locust St. 
Detroit— Joe Bloom, 63 E. Elizabeth St. 
Indianapolis — J. S. Cangney, 66 W. New cork St. 
Kansas City — H. M. Owens, Main St. and 17th. 
Little Rock— S. A. Arnold, 1116 W. Markham St. 
Los Angeles— W. T. Wall, 920 S. Olive St. 
Milwaukee— H. J. Terry, 174 Second St. 
Minneapolis — H. L. Mitchell, 608 First Ave., N. 
Newark — G. M. C. Fowler, 6 Mechanic St. 
New Orleans— A. G. Gugel, 229 Dauphone St. 
New York — C. A. Thompson, 1600 Broadway. 
Oklahoma City— J. C. De Walt, 119 Hudson St. 
Omaha — H. K. Moss. 1417 Harney St. 
Philadelphia — H. S. Beardsley, 211 N. 13th St. 



Pittsburgh — ]oe Bloom, 1018 Forbes St. 

Portland — A. B. Cleland, 392 Burnside St. 

Salt Lake City— L. J. Barrette, 64 Exchange PL 

San Francisco — W. O. Edmunds, 985 Market St 

Seattle— 2113 Third Ave. 

Spokane — C. P. Merwin, 408 First Ave. 

Washington, D. C— 916-18 G St., N. W. 

St. Louis — James Guest, 3308 Lindell Ave. 

PIONEER FILM CORP. 

New York City— Pioneer Film Corp., 130 W. 46th 

St. 

Detroit— Pioneer Film Corp., 53 Elizabeth St., E. 
Chicago — Greater Stars Prod., 537 S. Dearborn 
St. 

Buffalo — Pioneer Film Corp., 145 Franklin St. 
Philadelphia — Masterpiece Film Atartctions, 1235 
Vine St. 

Portland — Equity Distributing Co., 403 Davis St. 
Cleveland — Pioneer Film Corp., 812 Prospect Ave. 
Boston — Eastern Feature Film Co., 57 Church St. 
Atlanta — Criterion Film Service, 67a Walton St. 
San Francisco — Pioneer Film Corp., 107 Golden 
Gate Ave. 

Los Angeles — Pioneer Film Corp., 730 S. Olive St. 
Baltimore — Screen Art Pictures, 412 E. Lexing- 
ton St. 

Minneapolis — Merit Film Corp., 206 Film Exch. 
Bldg. 

Pittsburgh— S. & S. Film & Supply Co., 414 
Penn Ave. 

Cincinnati — Pioneer Film Corp., 532 Walnut St. 
Montreal, Can. — Amalgamated Exhibitors Circuit, 
, Ltd., 345 Bleury St. 

Toronto, Can. — Amalgamated Exhibitors Circuit, 
166 Bay St. 

Halifax, N. S. — Amalgamated Exhibitors Circuit, 

102 Hollis St. 
Dallas — Parker Film Co., 1810 Commerce St. 

EDUCATIONAL 

Atlanta, Ga., 73 Walton St. 

Boston, Mass., 10 Piedmont St. 

Buffalo, N. Y., 327 Main St. 

Chicago, 111.. 220 S. State St. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, N. W. Cor. 7th & Main Sts. 

Cleveland, Ohio, 501 Standard Theater Bldg. 

Dallas, Texas. 

Denver Colo. 

Des Moines, la., 100 Locust St. 

Detroit, Mich., 63 E. Elizabeth St. 

Indianapolies, Ind., 9 W. Market St. 

Kansas City, Mo., 5th flloor Film Ex. Bldg. 

Los Angeles, Calif., 732 S. Olive St. 

Louisville, Ky., National Theater Bldg. 

Minneapolis, Minn., 407 Loeb Arcade. 

New Haven, Conn., 128 Meadow St. 

New Orleans, La. 

New York City, 729 Seventh Ave. 

Omaha, Neb., 314 S. 13th St. 

Philadelphia, Pa., 1309 Vine St. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 414 Ferry St. 

St. Louis, Mo., 617 N. Grand Ave. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

San Francisco, Calif., 168 Golden Gate Ave. 

Seattle, Wash., 2014* Third Ave. 

Washington, D. C, Electric Theater Supply Co. 



Atlanta, Ga., Educational Film Exchange of 
Georgia, 73 Walton St. 

Boston, Mass., N. Y. Exchange for Educational 
Films, 10 Piedmont St. 

Buffalo, N. Y., N. Y. Exchange for Educational 
Films, 327 Main St. 

Chicago, 111., Educational Film Exchange of 
Illinois, Inc., 220 S. State St. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Ohio Exchange for Educa- 
tional Films Co., Inc., 7th & Main St. 

Cleveland, Ohio, Ohio Exchange for Educa- 
tional Films Co., Inc., 501 Standard Theater Bldg. 

Dallas, Texas, address not determined. 

Denver, Colo., address not determined. 

Des Moines, la., Educational Film Exchanges 
of Iowa, 100 Locust St. 

Detroit, Mich., Educational Film Exchanges of 
Michigan, 63 E. Elizabeth St. 

Indianapolis, Ind., Educational Film Exchange, 
Inp., of Indiana, 9 West Market St. 

Kansas City, Mo., Educational Film Exchanges 
of Iowa, 5th floor, Film Ex. Bldg. 

Los Angeles, Calif., Educational Film Corpora- 
tion of So. Calif., 732 S. Olive St. 




GLADYS WALTON 

Current Releases 

LA LA LUCILLE" "THE WAPCHMAKER" "OUT OF THE SKY" 

Mist Walton will be starred in a series of Universal Specials in the coming seasons of 1920-21 

144 



Louisville, Ky., Educational Film Exchange of 
Ky. — Tenn., National Th. Bldg. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Educational Film Exchange 
of Minn.. Inc.. 407 Eoeb Arcade. 

New Haven, Conn., N. Y. Exchange for Edu- 
cational Films, Inc., 128 Weadow St. 

New Orleans. La. 

New York City, N. Y. Exchange for Educa- 
tional Films. 729 Seventh Ave. 

Omaha, Neb., Educational Film Exchanges of 
Iowa. .114 S. 13th St. 

Philadelphia, Pa., Educational Film Exchange. 
Inc., Eleptric Theater Supply. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Educational Film Exchange, 
Inc., of Pittsburgh. 14 Ferry St. 

St. Louis, Mo., Educational Film Exchange of 
Missouri, Inc., 617 N. Grand Ave. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

San Francisco, Calif., Educational Film Ex- 
change of No. Calif.. 168 Golden Gate Ave. 

Seattle, Wash., Educational Film Exchange of 
Seattle, 2014 Third Ave. 

Washington, D. C, Educational Film Ex- 
change, Inc., Elec. Th. Supply Co. 

Goldwyn Pictures Corp. 

Atlanta— 111 Walton St. 

A. S. Dickinson. 
Boston — 42 Piedmont St. 

D. J. Horgan. 
Buffalo— 200 Pearl St. 

Geo. M. Hickey. 
Chicago— 207 St. Wabash Ave. 

Cecil E. Maberry. 
Cincinnati — 217 E. 5th St. 

lack Stewart. 
Cleveland— 40.1 Standard Theater Bldg. 

W. J. Kimes. 
Dallas— 1922 Main St. 

L. B. Remy. 
Denver — 1440 Welton St. 

Ben Fish. 
Detroit — Film Exchange Bldg. 

J. K. Flynn. 
Kansas City — 17th and Main Sts. 

W. E. Truog. 
Los Angeles — 912 So. Olive St. 

M. Wolf. 
Minneapolis — 16 North 4th St. 

Robert Cotton. 
New York City- 509 Fifth Ave. 

S. Eckman. 
Philadelphia— 1335 Vine St. 

Felix Mendelssohn. 
Pittsburgh— 1201 Liberty Ave. 

Nat Barach. 
San Francisco — 985 Market St. 

G. C. Parsons. 
St. Louis— 3312 Lindell Blvd. 

Tack Weil. 
Seattle— 2018 Third Ave. 

J. A. Koerpel. 
Washington. D. C— 714 11th St., N. W. 

Walter F. Hayner. 
New Orleans — 714 Povdras St. 

J. W. Pope. 
Omaha— 1508 Howard St. 

E. .1. Maclvor. 
Salt Lake City— 135 E. 2nd South St. 

W. E. Banford. 

Pathe Exchange, Inc. 

Atlanta— 111 Walton St. 
Dallas — 1715 Commerce St 
Chicago— 220 So. State St. 
Minneapolis — 608 First Ave.. \. 
New York — 1600 Broadway. 
Boston — 13 Stanhope St. 
Los Angeles — 920 So. Olive St. 
St. Louis— 3308 Lindell Ave. 
San Francisco 985 Market St. 
Albany— 35-37 Orange St. 
Pittsburgh— 1018 Forbes St. 
Cincinnati — 124 East 7th St. 
Cleveland — 750 Prospect Ave.. S. E. 
Oklahoma City — 119 So. Hudson St 
Philadelphia— 211 No. 13th St. 
New Orleans— 229 Dauphine St. 
Washington— 916-18 G St., N. W 



Kansas City — 1627 Main St. 
Denver -1436 Welton St. 
Omaha -1417 Harney St. 
Seattle— 2113 Third Ave. 
Salt Lake City — 64 Exchange PI. 
Indianapolis — 66 W. New York St. 
Des Moines — 100J4 E. Locust St. 
Newark — 6 Mechanic St. 
Charlotte — 235 So. Tryon St. 
Buffalo— 218 Franklin St. 
Milwaukee — 174 Second St. 
Spokane — 408 First Ave. 
Little Ro r k— 1116 W. Markham St. 
Portland— 392 Burnside St. 
Butte— 49 W. Granite St. 
Baltimore — 420 E. Lexington St. 

Reelcraft Pictures Corp. 

New York — Julius Singer, 729 Seventh Ave. 
Chicago— Carl Harthill, 207 S. Wabash Ave. 
Indianapolis — Geo. W. Wilson, 109 W. Maryland 
St. 

Milwaukee — G. Lawrence Stiles, 107 Second St. 
Minneapolis— Harry L. Muir, 306 Film Exchange 
Bldg. 

Also following exchanges releasing Reelcraft pic- 
tures : 

Atlanta— E. & H. Dist. Co., 73 Walton St. 
Boston— Arrow Film Co., 48 Piedmont St. ; R, D. 

Marson Attractions Co., 26 Piedmont St. 
Cincinnati — Standard Film Service, Film Exch. 

Bldg. 

Cleveland — Standard Film Service, 217 Sloan Blvd. 
Charlotte — Eltabran Film Co.. Piedmont Theater 
Bldg. 

Dallas— R. D. Lewis Film Co., 106 S. Cross St.; 

Special Features Co., 308 Market St. 
Little Rock— R. D. Lewis Film Co., 106 S. Cross 

St. 

Oklahoma City— R. D. Lewis Film Co.. 114 S. 

Hudson St. ; Tucker Bros. Film Co. 
Pittsburgh — Quality Film Co., 414 Ferrv St.; S. 

& S. Film & Supply Co., 414 Ferry St. 
Philadelphia — Masterpiece Film Attractions. 1235 

Vine St. 

Seattle — Greater Features Co., Inc.. 2020 Third 
Ave. 

St. Louis— United Film Service, 3628 Olive St. 
San Francisr-o — Consolidated Film Co., 90 Golden 
Gate Ave. 

Syracuse — Dooley Exchange, Inc., 445 S. Warren 
St. 

Washington — Exhibitors Film Exchange. 916 G St. 
Toronto — Canadian Exhibitors Exchange. Ltd.. .14 
Richmond St. 

Federated Film Exchanges 

Federated Film Exchange. Boston. Mass., New 
Haven, Conn. Sam Grand. Manager. 

Empire State Film Corn.. New Yor'< CItv, 
Buffalo. N. Y. Arthur G Whyte, Manas r 

Masterpiece Film Attractions. Philadelpl a. Pa. 
Ben Amsterdam, Manager. 

Quality Film Corp., Pittsburgh. Pa. Harry 
Lande, Manager. 

Standard Film Service, Cleveland. ().. Cin- 
cinnati, O., Detroit, Mich. Harry Charnas, 
Manager. 

Celebrated Players Film Co., Chicago 111. Joe 
Friedmann, Manager. 

Mid-West Dist. Co., Wilwaukee. Wis. Ralph 
Wettstein, Manager. 

Merit Film Corp.. Minneapolis. Minn. F. W. 
Thayer. Manager. 

United Film Service, St. Louis. Mo. Sam 
Werner, Manager. 

Crecent Film Service, Kansas City, Mo. Al 
Kahn, Manager. 

Supreme Photoplays Corp.. Denver. Colo.. 
Seattle, Wash. H. A. Kyler, Manager. 

Consolidated Film Corp., San Francisco. Cal.. 
Los Angeles, Cal. David Chadkin, Manager. 

R. D. Lewis Film Co.. Da'las, Tex., San An- 
tonio, Tex., Oklahoma City, Okla., Little Rock. 
Ark. L. T. Pellerin, Manager. 

Pea-rc F'Ims. Inc.. New Orleans. La.. Atlanta, 
("■a. J. Eugene Pea-re. ^apa"". 

Executive offices. 220 W. 42d St.. New York 



145 



Independent Exchanges — What They Handle 

Any omissions in the following list of exchanges and the product they distribute are due to 
the failure of concerns to supply repoits. 



ALABAMA 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA.— 

Queen Feature Service, 30 Potter Bldg Meal 
Hart and Al Jennings subject for Ala., Ga., Fla. 
and S. C. ; Mona Darkfeatlier Ind'an dramas, Ray 
comedies and Radin Real Star Dramas for Ala., 
Miss., Ga., Fla., N. and S. Car. and Tenn. 

ARKANSAS 

BATESVILLE, ARK.— 

M. & B. Distributing Co., — Heart of Texas 
Ryan, Man Trail. Range Boss, Straight Road. 
Virtuous Men, Some Nerve. 
PINE BLUFF, ARK.— 

Southern Film & Supply Co., P. O. Box 87 : 
Topical Tips and Enlighten Thy Daughter 
(commercial service included.) 

CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES, CAL.— 

Consolidated Film Corp., 738 So. Olive St.: 
Polly Moran 2 reelers, Monte Banks 2 reV/!M 
Texas Guinan 2 reelers, Muriel Ostrich 2 
reelers, Andy Gumps cartoon 1 reelers, Bdly 
Franey 1 reelers, Globe Trot scenics i reel, Alic 
Howell 2 reelers, Hall Room Boy3 2 rr-ficrs 
Billy West 2 reelers. Gale Henty 2 reelers, Helen 
Gibson 2 reelersfi Al Jennings and Neal Hart 2 
reelers. International Cartoons. Gaumont News 
Gaumont Graphic, Gaumont Pictorial Life, Illiter- 
ate Digest, Educational Films of America, Vod 
Vil movies. Photoplay Screen Supplement, Light- 
nings Brice (serial), Fatal Fortune (serial). 
Silent Mvstery (serial). Carter Case (serial). 

Sun Films, Inc., 730 S. Olive St.: For Cal 
Ore., Wash., Ida., Mont., Nev., and Ariz.: The 
Red Viper, It Happened in Paris, Daughter of 
the Don. The Vigilantes, The Law of Nature 
Human Passions, Man and Woman, And the Chil- 
dren Pay, Your Wife and Mine, 12 two reel 
Corbun productions, 12 two reel North Woods 
Prod.. 12 two reel Blazed Trail Urod., 26 two 
reel Doubleday Prod., Hawk's Trail and Mystery 
of 13 (serials). 26 one reel Doub'eday comedies 
20 one reel Billie Rhodes comedies. Handled 
from Seattle Exchange for Ore., Wash.. Ida. and 
Mont, only: Birth of a Nation. The Crisis 
Ramona. The Warrior, The Submarine Eye. The 
Masque of Life. 

Clune Film Exchange, 807 Knickerbocker Bldg. : 
For Cal., Ariz., and Nev.: The Clansman, 
Romona, Eyes of the World, Woman, The 
Toreador. Sacred Flame, His Pajama Girl. The 
Tvphoon. 

Renco Film Co., 724 South Spring St. : Birth 
of a Race, Mother Love and the Law, Lavender 
and Old Lace and The Master's Vineyard. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.— 

All Star Features Distributors. Inc., 1 "5 1 Golden 
Gate Ave. (also 514 W. 8th St., Los Aneeles) : 
Husbands and Wives, When the Desert Smiled. 
Heart of Texas Ryan. Once to Every Man, New 
De Luxe edition of The Whip. The Fall of Baby- 
lon, Mother and the Law, The Birth of a Race. 
Parentage, The Married Virgin, Blindness of 
Youth, Hearts of Men, The Spo'Ws. The Un- 
pardonable Sin, Yankee Doodle in Berlin, Mickey. 
The Days of Daring, God's Man. The Lone Hand. 
The Square Shooter, Dangerous Trails, Un- 
known Ranger, Al St. John 2 reel comedies, 
Screen Snap Shots series, 12 two reel Sunbeam 
comedies, 12 two reel Franklyn Farnum sub- 
jects, 16 two reel Tom Mix subjects, 12 one 
reel Arbuckle comedies, one reel Chaplin "Some 
Nerve," 13 Williamson scenics. 21 Rothacker 
scenics, 20 Helen Holmes subjects, Chaplin in 
Carmen. Bv the Sea, Work, Jitney Elopement 
and The Champion, series of 12 one reel Seunett 
comedy re-issues, 7 one reel Triangle comedies, 
2 two reel Triangle comedies. Pendleton Round 
Up, 3 Hart re-issues. Also Neglected Wives, 
The Italian, Fool's Gold. Someone Must Pay. 
The Price of Innocence. 



Liberty Film Exchange 168 Golden Gate Ave. : 
Virtuous Men, Curse of Eve, Glory, The Woman 
Who Dared, My Country First, In the Days of 
Daring, The Eternal Penalty. She Pays, Roses 
and Thorns, The Burning Silence, The Road of 
Tears, Sinners Thr-" The Barrier Helen H > mes 
railroad stories. Warren Kerrigan and Anna 
Little two reel western re-issues. Unique com- 
edies. 

Peerless Film Service, Inc., 94 Golden Gate 
Ave. (Also 802 S. Olive St. Los Angeles) Two 
reel comedies: Hank Mann. Christie. Jester. 
Romayne, Chaplin, Arbuckle and Keystone. Single 
reel comedies Christie, Hank Mann, Gayety, 
Jolly, Romayne, Chaplin, Arbuckle. Keystone 
and Griever educationals. 

Independent Film Exchange, 120 Golden Gate 
Ave. : The Folly of a Life of Crime. California 
Rodeo. Great Western Round-Up. The Pageant 
of San Francisco. The Life of Jesse lames (Ex- 
porters to Spanish- American countries). 

Consolidated Film Corp., 90 Golden ( ate Ave. : 
For Northern Cal.: Nev. and Hawaiian Islands: 
Billy Franey 1 reelers, Alice Howells 2 reelers. 
Original Billy West comedies, Gale Henry corn- 
ed es. Helen Gibson 2 reel railroad dramas, Al 
Jennings and Neal Hart 2 reel westerns. Inter- 
national cartoons, Gaumont News, Gaumont 
Graphic, Gaumont Pictorial Lite, Illiterate Digest, 
Educational Films of America. Vod-A-Vil Movies, 
Photoplay Screen Supplement, Globe Trots, Gump 
Cartoons, Polly Morans. 

COLORADO 

DENVER. COLO.— 

Quality Pictures, 17.15 Welton St -For Colo., 
Utah, N. Mex., Wyo. and So. Idaho. — Up in 
Mary's Attic. A Dream of Fair Women, Lost 
City and Lightning Bryce (serials). Victor 
Kremer's subjects and "The Jungle Princess." 

Supreme Photoplays Corp., 1446 Welton St. — 
For Colo., Wyo., N. Mex. and Utah: 52 World 
Masterpiece productions, 12 Kleine specials. 
Rothacker — Atlas Industrialogue. Gumps car- 
toons. Outing Chester travelouees. IHeterate 
Digest, 24 Neal Hart 2 reelers, 24 Al Jennings 
2 reelers., 28 two reel Keystones, 24 one and 
two reel Chaplins, 24 Arbuckle one ree'ers. 24 
Tom Mix one and two reelers, 16 two reel Wm 
Hart westerns Texas Guinan 2 reelers. Franey 
comedies, Millhurn Moranti comedies: Virtuous 
Men. Curse of Eve, Sky Eye, Babbling Tongues. 
Wives of Men, Once to Everv Man, The Bargain. 
Bandit & The Preacher. Wolves of the Street. 
Custer's Last Fight, Redemption, Vankee Doodle 
in Berlin. The Whin. Hearts of the World, Sins 
of Ambition, Married in Name Only. Varmen of 
the Klondike. Hell Hound of Alaska, Desert 
Scorpion. The Great White Trail, Miss Arizona 
Who's Your Neighbor. Zongar. Also owners of 
franchise of Federated Exchanges of America for 
entire northwest and Colo., Wyo., Utah and N 
Mex. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

WASHINGTON, D. C— 

Seaboard Film Corp., 916 G. St. N. W. : For 
Md„ Del., Va. and D. C. — 2 reel Hank Mann 
comedies, 2 reel Sunbeam comedies, 2 reel Alice 
Howell comedies; also for N. Car. — 2 reel Billy- 
West comedies, 2 reel Gale Henry comedies, 2 
reel Milburn Moranti comedies, 1 reel Arrow 
comedies, 1 reel Billy Franey comedies: For Md., 
Del., Va. and D. C, following 2 reel westerns: 
Blazed Trail, Northwood, Texas Guinans. Harry 
Myers. And all future releases of the Reelcraft 
Distrib. Corp. 

Variety Pictures Corp. 916 G. St. N. W. : For 
Del., Md., Va., D. C. : Mona Darkfeatlier Indian 
dramas, Facts and Follies series. Weakly Indi- 
gestions, Zip comedies. When the Desert Smiled, 
Woman's Law, When Men Betray. Staking His 
Life. Miss Arizona. Through Eyes of Men, Ashes 
of Love, Echo of Youth. Open Places. Bustin' 



147 




148 



into Society, Some Nerve, Log U-35, Shorty 
Hamilton westerns. 

Super-Film Attractions, Inc. (Sidney B. Lust) 
Mather lildg. : For Md., Del., D. C. and Va. : 
.lust a Woman, Nine Tenths of the Law, Crucible 
of Life. Raffles— Amateur Cracksman. The Whip 
Mickey, The Still Alarm, Cold Deck, On Trial, 
Are Passions Inherited; Christie comedies. Mutt 
and Jeff. Yankee Doodle in Berlin, The Con- 
fession ; Success Series consisting of Harts, Fair- 
hanks. Keenans and Talmadge. 

GEORGIA 

ATLANTA. GA.— 

K. & R. Film Co., 146 Marietta St.— Sacred 
Flame. Country That God Forgot, Blind Love, 
Calibre 38, Red Blood and Yellow. Out of the 
Night, Romance of the Underworld, Marriage, 
Son of a Gun, Naked Hands, Marriage for Con- 
venience, Love and the Law, Someone Must 
Pay, Grain of Dust, Wives of Men, Hearts of 
Men, 26 two reel westerns and dramas, 24 one 
reel comedies, Weakly Indigestion Carter Cast 
(15 episodes). Mystery of 13 (15 episodes). 

Quality Film Service, 75 Walton St.— 
Are you Legally Married, The Spreading Evil, 
When Arizona Won, Miss Arizona, The Cham- 
ber Mystery, 10 five reel Rex Ray western at- 
tractions, 12 Fatty Arbuckle comedies, 10 Snake- 
ville comedies, 10 Broncho Billy westerns, 17 
Negro comedies, 6 Constance Talmadge and Bill 
Parsons, 12 two reel Muriel Ostriche, Love's 
Protege. 

Premier Pictures Corp.. Hirsch Bldg. — Hall 
Room Boys comedies, Helen Gibson series, 
Helen Holmes series, The Spoilers, The Lady of 
the Dugout, She Pays, The Guilty Woman, Justice. 

Arthur C. Bromberg Attractions, 73 Walston 
St. — Series of five Essanay Chaplins (The Burl- 
esque on Carmen, The Champion, The Jitney 
Elopement, Work and By the Sea) Series of 26 
Hank Mann 2 reel comedies. The Fatal Sign 
(serial). Also one, tow and five reel subjects. 

E. & H. Film Distributing Co., Moore Bldg. — 
Billy West, Gale Henry, Alice Howell and Chris- 
tie 2 reel comedies ; Christie, Franey, Gayety and 
Napoleon and Sallie 1 reel -comedies; Virtuous 
Men, Exploits of a German Submarine U-35, Up 
in Mary's Attic, Hall Room Boy Comedies and 
Westerns starring Helen Holmes and Helen Gibson. 

Savini Films^ Inc., 63 Walton St. — 1 reel Billie 
Rhodes comedies, 2 reel Jester comedies, Hand 
of Vengeance (10 episodes serial), Ham and Bud 
1 reel comedies, Franklyn Farnum 2 reel West- 
erns, Gumps cartoons, Black Diamond 1 reel 
comedies, Pictorial Life, Ambrose 1 reel comedies, 
Tom Mix 2 reel westerns, Stingaree serial (15 
episodes), Shorty Hamilton re-issues, Captivat- 
ing Mary Carstairs (Norma Talmadge), Frivo- 
lous Wives, Confession, Woman. 

Southern Pictures Corp., 61 Walton St. — To- 
day, The Mad Lover, Lust of the Ages, Her 
Husband's Friend, The Woman's Law The 
Profiteer, When the Desert Smiled, Mysterious 
Mr. Browning, The Straight Road, Satan's Lawn, 
The Burning Silence. Valley of the Night. Sin- 
ners Three, The Barrier Between, Road of Tears, 
The Greyhound, Ashes of Love, Persuasive 
Peggy, The Great White Trail, Square Shooter, 
The Red Viper, Birth of a Race; Series of 30 
two reel westerns and Northwest Mounted Police 
Stories under Trade Brand — Lone Star- Blazed 
Trail productions; 30 two reel Kay- Bee westerns 
(re-issues), 40 single reel Tom Miq westerns, 
12 Franklyn Farnum two reel westerns, 10 Hank 
Mann single reel comedies 10 2 reel Sunbeams, 
4 two reel Jolly comedies, 10 Cub comedies 
(George Ovey), 9 two reel Mack Sennett Key- 
stone re-issues, 56 Mack Sennett Keystone 
single reel re-issues, 35 1 reel Arbuckle re-issues, 
22 1 reel Chaplin re-issues ; Serials : The Masked 
Rider, Lightning Bryce, Lurking Peril, Vanish- 
ing Trail. 

Wassman & Stephens, 121 Marietta St. — His 
Pajama Girl, Husbands and Wives, A Hoosier 
Romance, The Drifter. 1 1 two reel comedy 
dramas featuring Tom Moore, A Square Deal, 
Impossible Susan, Social Briars, Ghost of Rosy 
Taylor, Up Romance Road, Treason Reputation, 
Daughter of Maryland, Her Husband's Honor. 
The Dare Devil, Love's Law. Girl of My Dreams, 



Wasted Years, The Finger of Justice, Exploits 
of German Submarine U-35. 

W R. Hart Attractions, 121 Marietta St.— For 
Ala., Ga., N. and S. C, Fla.— Silver Threads 
Among the Gold. For Ala. and Ga. : Mickey. 

Consolidated Film & Supply Co., 11 Walton 
St. — Screaming Shadows (serial), Parted Cur- 
tains, For Love of Money and Fickle Women 

IOWA 

DAVENPORT. IA.— 

Magnet Film Co., 418 Harrison St. — For Iowa 

and Neb. : Reelcraft Productions — Howell com- 
edies, Wests, Texas Guinans, Franeys and two 
reel Jesters and Sunbeam comedies. 
DES MOINES, IA.— 

Greater Productions Co., 100 East Locust St. : 
For Iowa and Neb.: Lost City (serial), Gumps 
cartoons. Silk Husbands & Calico Wives, Sins 
of Ambition, Sport of Kings, Greater Sinner, 
Love Without Question, Desert Scorpion, Nine 
Tenths of the Law, The Married Virgin, The 
Spoilers, Al St. John comedies. Once to Every 
Man, Miss Arizona, Virtuous Sinners, Mysterious 
Mr. Browning, The Stranger, The Jungle 
Princess, Sky-Eye, The Square Shooter, Capti 
vating Mary Carstairs, Her Husband's Friend, 
Four Charlie Chaplins. For Iowa only : The 
Heart of Texas Ryan, Wives of Men, The Still 
Alarm, The Price Woman pays. 

INDIANA 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND.— 

Doll-Van Film Corp., 1606 Merchants Bank 
Bldg: Hearts of the World, Silk Husbands and 
Calico Wives, 2 reel Franklyn Farnum westerns. 
Jester comedies, 25 Mutual feature, 17 Billy 
Rhodes one reel comedies, Virtuous Men, Fool's 
Gold, Penny Philanthropist, Brown of Harvard, 
Yankee Doodle in Berlin, Unpardonable Sin, 
Chamber Mystery, Hushed Hour, Beyond the 
Law, Once to Every Man, Spreading Evil, Heart 
of Texas Ryan, Charlie Chaplin classics, Mystery 
of 13 (serial). 
TERRE HAUTE, IND.— 

Maurice Less Attractions' 5th St. and Big Four 
R. R. : For Ind. : The Natural Law, Wives of 
Men, Woman, Temptation, Days of Daring, She 
Pays, Helen Homes series, U-35. 

ILLINOIS 

CHICAGO, ILL.— 

Wholesome Film Co., 17 North Wabash Ave. — 
For State Rights and foreign — Little Red Rid- 
ing Hood, Cinderella and the Magic Slipper, 
Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. Following to come: 
Puss in Boots, Cat and the Fiddle, The Cow 
Jumped Over the Moon, Old Mother Hubbard, 
Little Boy Blue, Mother Goose. 

Century Films, Inc., 207 S. Wabash Ave. — 
For Illinois : Are You Legally Married, The 
House Without Children, The Square Shooter, 
Through Eyes of Men It Happened in Paris, 
Men of the West. 

The Lea-Bel Co., 64 West Randolph St.— Julius 
Caesar. Richard III, Vanity Fair, Quo Yadis, 
The Hoosier Schoolmaster, Rip Van Winkle, The 
Melting Pot, The Three Musketeers, The Rave, 
Wizard of Oz, Fairy and the Waif. Alice in 
Wonderland, Modern Mother Goose, Motoy nov- 
elties, 6 Travelogues and Zoology, 7 Industrial 
subjects. Shepherd of the Hills, A Message from 
Mars, Chocolate Soldier, Rainey's African Hunt 
The Rosary, Satan, Winning Loser, Western 
Honor, The Range Rider, Capturing a Sea Ele- 
phant, Missionary Work in China, Reluctant 
Cinderella, Last Days of Pompeii, Littlest Rebel, 
Efficiency Edgar's Courtship, Just Out oi Col- 
lege, Prince of Graustark, Golden Idict, Slim 
Princess, In the Palace of the King, Vicar of 
Wakefield. Young Mother Husbard, Kill Joy. 
Little Miss Grown-Up. Wanted — A Brother, 
Dream Doll, Little Sunset, Magic Toymake, 
Dick Whittingtdn and His Cat, Bridge of Fance, 
Little White Girl, Yellow 'Umbrella, Where is 
My Mother. Christie comedies. Max Linder 
comedies. Farmer Alfalfa cartoons. Musty Suffer 
comedies. Hard Luck -comedy), The Passion 
Play. In the Beginning, Childhood of Moses, Lea- 
Bel travelogues and nature study films. 



149 



Silee Film Exchange, 200 S. State St.— Blind 
Love Hoarder Raiders, Unknown Ranger, Dan- 
gerous Trails, Crimson Shoals, Jester Comedies, 
Human Passions, Ashes of Love, Heart of the 
Jungle, Suspicion, The Profiteer, Miss Arizona, 
City of Purple Dreams, Lust of the Ages. 

Greater Stars Productions, Inc., 537 S. Dear- 
bron St. (For Ind., 111. and Wis). — Hearts of 
Men, Tempest and Sunshine, Yankee Doodle in 
Berlin, Sins of the Children, Eyes of Youth, Long 
Arm of Mannister, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, 
Atonement The Borbidden Women, The Boom- 
erang. Stecher-Caddock Wrestling Match (2 reels), 
Will Rogers Illiterate Digest, Love Without 
Question, Place of Honeymoons, Blindness of 
Youth, Bubbles, Soulf of Rafael. 

Celebrated Player Film Corp., 207 S. Wabash 
Ave. — The Gumps, Depths of the Sea, Living 
Book fo Nature, Single Reel westerns, Jungle 
comedies, Hank Mann single reel comedies, Gay- 
ety comedies, Christie comedies, Topical Tips, 
Salisbury Wild Animals, Gaumont Pictorial, Gau- 
mont News, Gaumont Graphic Muriel Ostriche 
comedies. Snap Shots, Urban Chats, Smiling 
Billy Mason comedies, Briggs comedies; follow- 
ing 2 reel comedies: Christie Specials, Hall Room 
boys. Hank Mann, Northwoods, Film specials, 
Monty Banks, Polly Moran, Gump cartoons. 

LOUISIANA 

SHREVEPORT, LA. — 

Liberty Amusement Co., Inc., 627 Crockett St. : 
For La., Miss.: 12 Texas Guinans, 18 Mack Swain 
comedies. For Tex., Okla. and Ark. : The 
Spoilers, Mothers of Liberty, For Tex., Okla., 
Ark. and La. : The Deemster. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA.— 

Pearce Films, 608 Canal St.: 15 two reel Wm 
S. Hart westerns, 16 two reel Tom Mix westerns 
12 two reel Anna Little westerns, 29 Keystone 
comedies, 17 one reel Chaplins, 32 one reel 
Arhuckles, yi reel Pictorial Life, 1 reel 
Fletchers Screen Monologue each week, 10 epi- 
sode The Hand of Vengeance, 12 episode The 
Liberator, 15 episode The Mystery of 13, 24 AI 
Jennings two reel westerns, 24 Neal Hart 2 reel 
westerns, 24 Helen Gibson 2 reel subjects, 12 
Cuckoo Comedies, 26 Jester comedies; Her Code 
of Honor, A Man in the Open, Her Game, A 
Man's Fight, Woman Under Oath, Adele, Light 
of Western Stars, Playthings of Passion, Cleo- 
patra, Warfare of the Flesh, Birth of Democ- 
racy, Enlighten Thy Daughter, Denny From Ire- 
land, The Snail, The Hell Hound of Alaska, The 
Lone Avenger, Berlin via America, The Grain 
of Dust, Woman, The Mormon Maid. Miss 
Arizona, Modern Magdalen. Human Orchid, 
Zongar, The Bargain. The Bandit and the 
Preacher. Today, Eyes of the World. Spreading 
Evil, Still Alarm, Woman's Law. Hushed Hour. 
Suspicion, Girl from Nowhere, Rafflles. Why the 
Bullshevik, Alma Where do you Live. Your Wife 
and Mine, Reclaimed, The Heart of Texas Ryan, 
the Law of Nature, Boots and Saddles, Hands ot 
the Law, Virtuous Sinners. The Power of Evil. 
The Lady of the Dugout, The Window Opposite 
The Blindness of Youth, The House without 
Children. The Confession, Husbands anil Wives 
Crimson Shoals. 

MARYLAND 

BALTIMORE. MD.— 

Screen-Art Pictures, 412 E. Lexington St. — Re- 
claimed, Someone Must Pay, The Sacred Flame. 
Charlie Chaplin comedies, One Million Dollars 
Reward (serial). Girl from Nowhere, Sins of the 
Children, Long Arm of Mannister, Atonement, 
Virtuous Sinners A Child for Sale, Dr. Jeklyy 
and Mr. Hyde, Bobby Burns comedies. 

Mozart Film Exch. — Fickle Women. 

Square Deal, operating Wilkesbarre exchange 
opened a local office. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BOSTON, MASS.— 

R. D. Marson Attraction Co., 26 Piedmont St. — 
Hilly West and Gale Henry comedies. Texas 
Guinan and Billy Franey comedies. 

KLin Distributing Corp., 53 Church St. 
Jack'e Sa"nde-s in A Bit of Kindling Hetty Be 
Good. Hab The Fixer, Sunny Jane, The Wild 
cat. The Checkmate; Anita King in The Girl 



Angle; The Superman. The Spoilers, Idle Wives, 
and the Children Pay. In the Days of Daring, 
Brown of Harvard, The Mysterious Mr. Brown- 
ing, 6 Security Features. 6 subjects starring 
Gloria Joy and Henry King, 15 two reel Shorty 
Hamilton westerns. The Demon's Shadow 
(serial). 

Popular Film Co., 14 Piedmont St. — For New 
England Territory : Her Moment, Should She 
Obey, The Cast Off. Martin Eden, High Hand, 
Master Cracksman Land of the Head Hunters, 
Has Man a Right to Kill, Monte Cristo, The De 
coy, The Span of Life, The Cycle of Fate, Dan, 
Michael Strogoff. Reclaimed, The Thorough- 
bred, Man on the Box, Macbeth, 10 Jackson 
two one reel comedies and 
feature to be released at 
month. First one Secret 



features, 50 one and 
a series of 12 new 
the rate of one a 
Formula. 

Major Film Corp., 
series. Hank Mann 
Gaumont pictorial 



16 Piedmont St. — Neal Hart 
and Mack Swain series. 
Life and Vodavil series. 
Princess Mona Darkfeather series, Texas Guinan 
series. Anna Little series. Helen Gibson series. 
Once to Every Man Circumstantial Evidence 
Echo of Youth, Reclaimed, She Wolf, 
Shephard of Bargain Row, 
Places, Men of 



Little 

Man Trail. Open 
„ the Desert, Little Shoes Effici- 
ency Edgar's Courtship. Land of Long Shadow 
Alster Case, Range Boss. Gift of Gab KnocK 
Na Gow, Soul of a Child, Are you Legall y Mar- 
ried Power of Evil. Boots and Saddles, Hands 
of the Law. Lion of the Hills Wizard ot O 
Crisis! Eyes of the World. Shepherd of the Hills. 

Ea-trrn Frature Film Co., 57 Criurcn ai. 
BUnd Love Mother I Need You, Bubbles The 
Kev to Power, The Hidden Code. Midnight 
Gambols The Common Level. A Place of Honey 
moons Nobody's Child, What Woman Want 
Whv Tell? Dr. Jekell & Mr. Hyde, Someone Must 
Pay, Virtuous Men. Long Arm of Mannister The 
Boomerang, Sins of the Children Yankee Doodle 
m Berlin 8 Women. Sky Eye Virtuous Sinner , 
The Atonement, The Girl from Nowhere Su- 
spicion, Beyond the Law, Wives of Men The S ill 
Alarm, The Prodigal Wife The Accidental 
Honeymoon, Nine Tenths of the Law . When .the 
Desert Smiled. Carmen of the Klondike Stolen 
Orders The Lady of the Dugout, Struggle Ever- 

,a Bos g ton Photoplay Co., 50 Broadway -Raffles. 
The Public Defender, Redemption, Mother, The 
Mormon Maid. The Libertine Uupardonable 
Sin, Mickey, Lost Battalion, Hearts of Men. 
Loyalty, When Destiny Wills Peg O the Sea. 
Humility, Staking His Life, The Master Crook 
16 five reel William Hart subjects, 7 five reel 
Norma Talmadge subjects, 12 five reel Douglas 
Fairbanks subjects 9 five reel Frank Keenan 
subjects 17 two reel William Hart subjects, 24 
one reel Fatty Arbuckle subjects, 13 two reels 
Shorty Hamilton subjects, 33 five and six reel 
Art Drama productions, 9 Lynch productions 
666 one reel Christie comedies, 15 single reel 
Tungle comedies, 6 single reel western subjects: 
following features approved for Sunday showing : 
Fighting in France, The Waif, The Other_ n - 
Little Sunset, She Stoops to Conquer, 



Girl. 
Guard 



ing Old Glory, Little Miss Fortune, The House 
of Cards, Miss Deception, When You and I 



Little 
Adams 
Star 
Cry of 



Were Young, Think It Over, The 
Samaritan David Coipperfield, Quincy 
Sawyer ; ' 500 feet patriotic subjects ; 
Spangled Banner. Columbia, The Battle 
Freedom; 8 Outing- Chester travel pictures. 

Associated First National Pictures of N. E. 
Inc., 7 Isabella St. — First National franchise 
holders. Also Universal releases, Lehrman 
comedies, Fire Flingers. Depths of the Sea, Hall 
Room Boy comedies. Screen Smiles, Gaumont 
News. Graphic Weekly and Gumps. 

Klein Distributing Corp.— The Heart of a 
Woman. 

Climax Film Corp. — Love's Battle and the 
Fourth Face. 

Arrow Film Corp. of New England.— The 
Golden Trail. 

Motion Picture Distributing Corp.. 214 Eliot 
St — Exploits of German Submarine U-35. Greater 
Sinner, The Lone Hand. Springtime, Ashes ot 
Desire. Frivolous Wives. 



151 



Charles T. Horan 

Director 



J. G. Productions 



'Man's Plaything' 

with Grace Davison 

'Black Eyes" 

with Taylor Holmes 



Hatch Photoplay Service, 42 Melrose St. — For 
New England. — Love Without Question, The 
Sacred Flame, The Illiterate Digest. 

Lightning Photoplays Service of N. E , 20 Mel 
rose St. — Lightning Bryce and A Woman ra 
Grey (serials), 12 two reel Northwoods dramas, 
12 two reel Lone Star westerns, 12 two reel 
Franklyn Farnum subjects, 8 two reel Sunbeam 
comedies, Chamber Mystery, Wolves of the Street 
and Law of Nature. 

Masterpiece Film Distributing Corp.. 12 Pied- 
mont St.: For New England — Hearts in Exile, 
Rise of Susan, Lola without a Soul, The Feat of 
Life, The Savage Instinct, Marriage a la Carte, 
Dark Silence, The Yellow Passport, The White 
Rider, The Pawn of Fate, The Butterfly on the 
Wheel, Should a Wife Forgive, The Closed Road. 
The Almighty Dollar, The Ivory Snuff Box, The 
Hand of Peril, 7 Alice Brady subjects, 6 Rob- 
ert Warwick subjects, 5 Ethel Clayton subjects. 

MICHIGAN 

DETROIT.— 

Arthur S. Hyman Attractions Inc., Film Bldg. — 
26 two reel Hank Manns, 15 two reel Joy com- 
edies, series of 2 reel Westerns including Border 
series, Emmett Dalton series and Wallace Coburn 
series. Also single reel Outing Chester travel- 
ogues. Hawk's Trail (serial), Mystery of 13 and 
Vanishing Trails (serials), Franklin Farnum 
series, Chamber Mystery, Man of the West, 
Woman's Man and Love's Protege. Johnny Ray 
single reel comedies, George Ovey single reel 
comedies. Unique single reel comedies. Terri- 
torial rights on Fool's Gold, Virtuous Men, Wives 
of Men, Woman, When the Desert Smiled, Hearts 
of Man, Penny Philanthropist, Mother Love and 
the Law, Raffles, Redemption, The Whip, I Be- 
lieve and Her Bargain. 

The Educational Film Company, Film Build- 
ing Elizabeth and John R. Street, — releasing Will 
Rogers, Illiterate Digest, Urban's Movie Chats, 
Screen Snapshots, Gaumont Pictorial Life, Tom 
Bret's "Topical Jazz, monologue and Motoy cin- 
ema dolls ; ; ;distribution through Standard Film 
Service Company, Film Bldg., Detroit, Michigan 
for Michigan and Northwestern Ohio, 

The Federated Film Exchange Company, Film 
Building, Elizabeth and John R. Streets, distrib- 
uting the product of the Federated Film Ex- 
changes of America, Inc., including Monty Banks 
comedies. Nobody's Girl, a Billy Rhodes feature, 
and a series of features, comedies and serials, 
distribution through Standard Film Service Co., 
in Michigan and Northwestern Ohio. 

Standard Film Service Company, Film Build- 
ing, Elizabeth and John R. Streets, Harry L. 
Charnas, General Manager, J. C. Fishman, man- 
ager ; member federated film exchanges of 
America, Inc., distributing Federated product, in- 
cluding Monty Banks comedies, Nobody's Girl, a 
Billy Rhodes feature and a series of features, 
comedies and serials ; also distributing the pro- 
duct of the Educational Film Company, includ- 
ing Will Rogers' Illiterate Digest, Urbans Movie 
Chats, Tom Bret's Topical Jazz monologue 
Screen Snapshots, Gaumont Pictorial Life and 
Motoy cinema dolls; also distributing Al St 
John, Hall Room Boys, Alice Howell, Muriel 
Ostriche, Gale Henry, Christie Special, Billy 
West, Jester, Sunbeam', Bobby Burns, Majestic 
and Briggs two reel comedies, Franey, Gayety, 
Christie, Briggs, Majestic, Capital, Arbuckle, 
Keystone, Jungle and Kid one reel comedies, Tom 
Mix one reel Westerns and comedies, William 
S. Hart and Texas Guinan two reel westerns, 
North Woods two reel dramas, Depths of the 
Sea, U-35, The End of the Road, Open your 
Eyes, and Fit to Win, specials and The Loit 
City, The Carter Case, The Masket Rider, 
Lightning Bryce, The Lurking Peril, The Tiger 
Band and A Woman in Grey, serials, Territory, 
Michigan and Northwestern Ohio. 

Strand Features Inc., 201 Film Exchange 
Bldg.: Fires of Hope, Human Shuttles, House 
of Cards, Shadow of Fear, Behind the Mask, Per- 
fect Model, Still Alarm, Sinners Three, The Val- 
ley of the Night .The She Wolf, She Pays, The 
Curse, Days of Daring, Eternal Penalty, Roses 
& Thorns, Justice, Guilty Woman. Modern Venus, 
Who Knows, Unknown Ranger, Dangerous 
Trails, Witches Lure; 18 one reel Chaplins, 3 
two reel Chaplins; 51 one reel Ham and Bud, 24 



one reel Fatty Arbuckles, 16 two reel Tom Mix, 
12 two reel Lone Star series, 16 two reel Kathlyn 
Williams animal subjects, 19 two reel Al Jen- 
nings westerns, 10 one reel Hank Manns, 12 two 
Texas Guinan .westerns, 4 one reel and 4 two 
reel Jolly comedies, 12 two reel Canadian North- 
west Mounted Police subjects, 12 two reel 
Franklyn Farnum westerns, 14 two reel Helea 
Gibson railroad subjects, 18 two reel Neal Harts 
westerns, 18 one reel Gumps cartoons, 16 on* 
reel Poppy comedies, 16 two reel Wm. S. Hart 
stubjects, 1919 Pendleton Roundup, 26 two reel 
Westerns and Kay Bee, 12 one reel Jaxon com- 
edies, Ford Sterling 2 and 3 reel comedies, 3 
two reel Chester Conjdins, 1 two reel Billy West, 
3 two reel Fatty Arbuckle and Mabel Normand, 
1 three reel Fatty Arbuckle and Mabel Normand, 
Red Viper, Through Eyes of Men, Human Pas- 
sions, What Happened in Paris, 15 two reelers 
Adventures of a Girl Reporter, Helen Holme* 
series. Shorty Hamilton series, Zip comedies. 

William A. Haynes has opened a new independ- 
ent exchange. 

MINNESOTA 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.— 

Elliott Film Corp., Produce Exchange Bldg. : 
For Iowa: Birth of a Nation, The Crisis, Ramona, 
Stolen Orders, Five Nights, Cleopatra, Mother* 
of Liberty, Whither Thou Goest, Zongar, On the 
Isonzo, Little Orphan, Salamander, Corruption, 
Soul of a child. For Nebraska: Birth of a Na- 
tion, The Crisis, Romona, Five Nights, Cleo- 
patra, Mothers of Liberty, Little Orphan, Whither 
Thou Goest, On the Isonzo, Zongar, Salamander. 
For Minn., N. and S. Dak. : Birth of a Nation, 
The Crisis, Ramona, Stolen Orders, Submarine 
Eye, Garden of Allah, Birth of a Race (Minn, 
only), Virtuous Men, Public Defender, Cleopatra, 
Five Nights, Mothers of Liberty, Salamander, 
Heart of the Jungle, Corruption, Zongar, The 
Snail, Denny from Ireland, Whither Tho Goest, 
On the Isonzo, Cold Deck, Are You Legally Mar- 
ried, Stripped for a Million, Witching Hour, Soul of 
a Child, Little Orphan, Topical Tips, Helen Gib- 
son series. Shorty Hamilton series. For Wis. : 
The Crisis, Ramona, Submarine Eye, Garden of 
Allah, Stolen Orders, Public Defender, Mother of 
Liberty, Cleopatra, Five Nights, Wither Thou 
Goest, Zingar, Little Orphan, On the Isonzo, 
Denny from Ireland, The Snail, Are you Legally 
Married? Stripped for a Million, Heart of the 
Jungle, Salamander, Comedies (5), Helen Gibson 
series, Corruption, Witching Hour, Soul of a 
Child, Topical Tips, Shorty Hamilton series. 

William A. Lochren Film & Slide Co., Film 
Exchange Bldg: Manufacture commercial and 
industrial subjects, educational films, news pic- 
tures and scenics. Distribute Northwest Weekly 
(news reel), special industrial and educational 
subjects, boy scout pictures, scenics, etc. 

Friedman Film Corp., 300 Film Exchange Bldg. : 
Minn., Wise, N. Dak., S. Dak.: The Unpar- 
donable Sin, The Whip, The Spoilers, Grain of 
Dust, Lust of the Ages, The Bar Sinister, 16 
William S. Harts, 7 Norma Talmadges, 12 
Douglas Fairbanks, 9 Frank Keenans, Fatty 
Arbuckle comedies. 

Wescott Film Corp., 700 Film Exchange* 
Bldg. : Midland Film Co., same address for Minn., 
N. and S. Dak., and Wis., as folios: Fall of 
Babylon, Mother and the Law, Ranger, Pen Vul- 
ture and When Arizona Won. Westcott Film 
Corp. : Masque of Life, Modern Lorelei and A 
Morman Maid. (Westcott distribute for Mid- 
land Film Co.) 

First Film Co., 305 Loeb Arcade Bldg. : For 
Minn.. No. and So. Dak. : Lightning Bruce 
(serial), Eyes of Youth, Forbidden Woman, Soul 
of Rafael, Mid-Channel, 2 Wm. Hart subjects, 
Custer's Last Fight, Love Without Question. 

Tri-State Film Exchange, Loeb Arcade Bldg : — 
Lost City (serial) for Wis., Minn., N. and S. 
Dakota, Tex series from Arrow Corp., for Minn., 
N. and S. Dakota, Subeam Comedies from 
Florida Film Corp., for Minn., N. and S. D. 
Mack Sennett Keystone Mutual re-issues for N. 
and S. D. and Minn., Northwood 2 reel drama* 
for N. and S. D. 

Midland Films, Inc., Film Exchange Bldg. — 
The Fall of Babylon, The Mother and the Law, 
Up in Mary's Attic, Silk Husbands and Calico 
Wives, The Golden Trail. Woman's Man, The 
Ranger, Pen Vulture, When Arizona Won. 



HARRY A. FISCHBECK 

Cinematographer > U. S. C. 

Photographing 

GRACE DAVbON 



European Productions of the 
Highest Class 

We Are One of the Oldest and Largest 
FOREIGN PRODUCERS 

FOR NEGATIVE RIGHTS 

WIRE OR WRITE 

The Swedish Biograph Company 

220 W 7 est 42d Street, New York 
Offices: london Stockholm paris 

Ernest Mattsson, General Manager 

154 



MISSOURI 

ST. LOUIS, MO.— 

United Film Service, 3628 Olive St.: Mickey. 
Hearts of the World, Fall of Babylon, Mother 
and the Law, Sherry Releases, George Kleine 
releases, Birth of a Nation, Custer's Last Fight, 
The Curse, I Believe, The Ranger, Brown of 
Harvard, Neal Hart in 2 reel westerns, Al Jen- 
nings in 2 reel westerns, Helen Gibson 2 reel 
railroad dramas, Helen Holmes in The Fatal For- 
tune (serial), Kay Bee Union, Arbuckle and Chap- 
lin comedies, Keystone comedies, The Lost City 
(serial). 

Standard Film Corp., New Piazza Bldg. : 
Serials: Silent Mystery, Masked Rider. Mystery 
of Thirteen, Lightning Bryce, Stingaree ; Fea- 
tures : Unpardonable Sin, Today, Mad Lover, 
Eternial Penalty, Roses & Thorns, She Pays, 
Guilty Woman, Justice, Bar Sinister, Those Who 
Pay, Whither Thou Goest, Men, Birth of De- 
mocracy, Just a Woman, One Law for Both; 2 
reel comedies : Christie, Hall Room Boy. Ro- 
maynes ; 1 reel comedies : Christie, Ham and Bud, 
Arbuckle, George Ovey ; Specials: 10 scenic 
subjects, Screen Monologue, Photoplay Screen 
Monologue, Photoplay Screen Supplement, Top- 
ical Tips, Log of U-35; 2 reel western: 10 Tom 
Mix subjects, 8 Shorty Hamilton subjects; 16 
Kathlyn Williams subjects. 

Independent Producers Film Corp.; Empress 
Theater Bldg. — 26 features and 3 serials from 
Hallmark. Also Blazed Trail, 2 reel westerns, 
and Ebony comedies. 

Independent Film Exchange, 3431 Olive St. — 
The Woman He Chose, Virtuous Men, Are You 
Legally Married, Tempest and Sunshine, 2 reel 
western Blazed Trail productions, The Carter 
Case (serial). 
KANSAS CITY, MO.— 

Standard Film Corp., 12 East 17th St.: Serials: 
Lightning Bryce, Masked Rider, Mystery of 13 
Silent Mystery, Stingaree; Tom Mix two reelers. 
Wm. S. Hart two reelers, Kathlyn Williams two 
reelers ; Keystone, Hall Room Boy, Romayne 
Ham and Bud, T axon a "d Arbuckle comedies; 
The Bargain, Bandit and the Preacher, Hell 
Hound of Alaska, Foursquare Feature, Roses 
and Thorns, She Pays, Eternal Penalty, Justice 
Guilty, Woman, Unpardonable Sin, Five Nights 
Woman's Law, Today, Mad Lover, Satan on 
Earth (2 reels), Real Roosevelt (2 reels), Gau- 
mont News, Gaumont Graphic, 2 reel Harry Carey 
Westerns. 

Exhibitors' Film Co., 302 Ozark Bldg — Ex- 
hibitors' Mutual features, Rothacker Outdoor 
scenics, Little Sambo comedies. Broncho Billy 1 
reel dramas, Snakeville comedies, Billie Rhodes 
comedies ; Tom Moore 2 reel dramas ; also Strip- 
ped for a Million, The Perfect Model, Tempest 
and Sunshine and Virtuous Men. 

Equitable Film Corp., 412 Ozark Bldg. — 
Mothers of Liberty, The City of Purple Dreams, 
Who Shall Take My Life, Cleopatra, The Human 
Orchid, A Modern Lorelei, The Public Defender, 
The Master Crook, Hearts of Men, The Belgian, 
Zeppelin's Last Raid, Who's Your Neighbor? The 
Curse of Eve; 12 Anna Little 2 reel westerns, 
27 Billy West 2 reel comedies, 16 Doll Motoy 
1 reel comedies, 15 Shorty Hamilton 2 reel west- 
erns, 11 Blazed Trail 2 reelers, 1919 Pendleton 
Round-Up, 12 reel serial Maciste, 3 Great North- 
ern 4 reel dramas, 16 Jester 2 reel comedies, 10 
Land of Rising Sun 1 reel scenic educationals, 24 
Gale Henry 2 reel comedies, 10 Napoleon and 
Sally 1 reel comedies. 

NEBRASKA 

LINCOLN, NEB.— 

Nebraska Feature Co., 1210 P St.: At present 
only making pictures and renting a cheap, com- 
mercial service. 
OMAHA, NEB.— 

Omaha Film Exchange,. 198 S. 14th St. — Neb. 
and Iowa. — Fool's Gold, Strife, Stripped for a 
Million, Denny from Ireland, The Snail, Pen Vul- 
ture, The Ranger, When Arizona Won. 



F. A. F. Enterprises, Inc., 214 So Fourteenth 
St. — Yankee Doodle in Berlin, Carmen (Charlie 
Chaplin), Someone Must Pay, Hearts of the 
World, Gayety comedies. 

Fontenelle Feature Film Co., 1504 Harney St.: 
Iowa and Neb.: The Vigilantes, Woman, Hus- 
bands and Wives, Masque of Life, Heart of 
Texas Ryan, Witches Lure, Hall Room Boys 
26 two reelers, Billy West 30 2 reelers, Gale 
Henry 20 two reelers, 2 reel Neal Harts, Al 
Jennings and Helen Gibson, 18 Arrow Border 
Pictures, 12 two reel Canyon pictures, Gaumont 
News Service, Topical Tips, Gaumont Pictorial 
Life, 15 Price Indian dramas, Lightning Bryce 
and Hand of Vengeance (serials). 

NEW YORK 

ALBANY, N. Y.— 

Gardiner Syndicate, 47 W. Swan St. — Mickey, 
Yankee Doodle in Berlin, Birth of a Race, Lost 
Battalion, Everybody's Business, Virtuous Men, 
Sacred Flame, Silk Husbands and Calico Wives, 
Tillie's Punctured Romance, Superman, Blind- 
ness of Youth, Married Virgin, Dream of Fair 
Women, The Bargain, Hellhound of Alaska, 
Bandit & the Preacher, Staking His Life, Satan's 
Pawn, Straight Road, single and two reel Chaplin 
and Arbuckles, 2 reel Wm. Harts and 2 reel 
Sennetts and Kay Bees single reel Keystones. 

Ben Fitzer opened new independent exchange 
also operating in Buffalo with Woman Untamed, 
the first release. 
BUFFALO, N. Y.— 

Pioneer Film Corp., 145 Franklin St. — For ter- 
ritory west of Utica and Binghamton, N Y. — 
Atonement, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Long Arm 
of Mannister, Unpardonable Sin, Boomerang, Girl 
from Nowhere, Sins of the Children, Lady of the 
Dugout, Virtuous Sinners, Hearts of Men, Little 
Orphan Annie, Wives of Men, Suspicion, Still 
Alarm, Who Shall Take My Life, Cold Deck, 
Civilization, Bubbles, Hidden Code. Serials: 
Lurking Peril, Carter Case and Craig Kennedy; 
Facts and Follies. 

Merit Film Corp. 327 Main St. — Following 2 
reel comedies : Hall Room Boys, Keystone come- 
dies Jester Super comedies, 2 reel Bear Cat 
comedies, Beech Nuts, Ambrose and the Bathing 
Girls; following single reel comedies Hank 
Man, Popply comedies, Mack Swain and George 
Ovey; Topical Tips; 2 reel dramas; 12 Texas 
Guinan, 4 Lone Star westerns, 4 Franklyn Farn- 
um, 5 Kathlyn Williams adventures and animal 
pictures, 4 Helen Gibson railroad dramas ; Merit 
Feature: She Wolf, Brown of Harvard, Fools 
Gold, Heart of Texas Ryan, Who's To Blame, A 
Wife's Story, Like an Old Fool, Truth Will Pre- 
vail, Repentance, David Copperfield; Masterpiece 
Features : The Trap, A Woman Alone, Maternity 
The Man of the Hour, The Stolen Voice, Friday 
the 13th. The Raake, The Dancer's Peril. Human 
Dritfwood, The Family Honor, Souls Adrift, 
Whims of Society, The Hidden Scar, The Pawn 
of Fate, Butterfly on Wheel, The Closed Road, 
Should a Wife Forgive The Divorce Game and 
The Man Who Forgot; Mother I Need You; 
Francis Ford serials. 

Dooley Exchange, Inc. 338 Pearl St. — 5 five 
reel Shorty Hamilton subjects, When the Desert 
Smiled, His Daughter Pays, Miss Arizona, The 
Profiteer, Once to Every Man, The Window Op- 
posite, Stripped for a Million, Reclaimed, Are 
You Legally Married, A Child for Sale, Unknown 
Ranger, Dangerous Trail, Border Raiders ; Ser- 
ials : Vanishing Trail, Lightning Bryce, $1,000,000 
Reward; 24 two reel Neal Hart 24 tw reel Al 
Jennings, 12 two reel in An Little, 13 two reel 
Texas Guinan ; 26 two reel Billy West, 27 two 
ree 1 Billy West, 26 two reel Gale Henry; 24 
one reel Tom Mix, 10 one reel Monkey comedies, 
9 two reel Jester comedies, "Let 'Er Buck" 
(1919 Pendelton Round-Up), 52 one reel Educa- 
tional subjects, 52 one reel Gaumont's Pictorial 
Life. 

Nu-Art Pictures Corp 221 Franklin St.: N. Y. 
State, exclusive of N. Y. City. — Eyes of Youth, 
Forbidden Woman. Mid Channel, For the Soul 
of Rafael, Why Women Sin, Love Without 
Question. 



155 




FRANK BEAL, Director 

M. P. D. A. 

Address: Box 27, Wid's Daily Hollywood, California 

156 



SYKACU3T, N. Y. — 

Dooley Ix:hange, Inc., 445 S. Warren St. : 
5 Shorty Hamilton 5 reelers ; When The Desert 
Smiled His Daughter Pays, Miss Arizona, The 
Profiteer. Once to Every Man, The Window 
Oppos te, Stripped for a Million, Reclaimed. The 
Unknown Ranger, Dangerous Trails, The Border 
Raiders. A Child for Sale, Are You Legally 
Married; 24 two reel Neal Harts, 24 two reel 
Al Jennings' 12 two reel Ann Little's, 13 two 
reel Texas Guinans, 26 two reel Billy West. 27 
two reel Billy West, 25 2 reel Gale Henry, 26 
two reel Al ee Howell, 24 one reel Tom Mix, 10 
one reel Monkey comedies, 9 two reel Jester 
comedies. "Let 'Er Buck," 1919 Pendelton 
Round-Up. 52 one reel Educational subjects, 52 
one reel Gaumont Pictorial Life, Lightning Bryce 
(serial). $1,000,000 Reward (serial). 
UTICA, N. Y.— 

Robbins Film Co., Inc., : Up in Mary's Attic, 
The Confession, Blind Love. The Price Woman 
Pays, The Lone Hand, The Crisis, Charles Joy 
comedies, The Children Pay, Al St. John com- 
edies, Vod-a-Vil movies (24 subjects) and The 
Fatal Fortune (Helen Holmes Serial). 
NEW YORK CITY.— 

Pioneer Film Corp., 126 West 46 St. : The Lost 
City, What Women Want, Hidden Code. Place 
of Honeymoons, Nobody's Child, Midnight Gam- 
in, Is, Empty Arms, Bubbles, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. 
Hyde, Sins of the Children, Atonement. Girl from 
Nowhere. Kong Arm of Monnister, The Boom- 
erang, Unpardonable Sin, Hearts of Men, Lady 
of the Dugout, Virtuous Sinners, Redemption, 
To-Day, Carmen of the Klondike, Still Alarm, 
Wives of Men, Suspicion, Cold Deck, Who Shall 
Take My Life. The Garden of Allah, Accidental 
Honeymoon, Struggle Everlasting, Civilization, 
Facts and Follies Series (13). 

Medal Film Co., Inc., 1476 Broadway — Produc- 
tions for Cuba, Porto Rico, Santo Domingo and 
Hayti. Through branch offices exploit produc- 
tions of Metro, Goldwyn, Essanay Triangle and 
J. Brockliss, Inc. 

Warner Bros., 220 West 42nd St.— -Lost City 
and Tiger Band serials, Al St. John and Monty 
Banks two reel comedies. 

Commonwealth Film Corp., 1600 Broadway — 
Virtuous Men for N. Y., including Westchester 
Co., Eyes of Youth for X. Y. (up state handled 
by Nu-Art Pictures Corp). Forbidden Women for 
X. Y., Sacred Flame for N. Y. C, West- 
chester Co. and No. N. J., Silk Husbands and 
Calico Wives for X. Y. C. and Westchester Co., 
Love Without Question for X. Y , Whv Women 
Sin for X. Y., Whispering Devils for N. Y. and 
Xo. X. J., She Played and Paid for N. Y and 
Xo. X. J.. For the Soul of Rafael lor X. Y., Mid 
Channel for X. Y. 

N. Y. Independent Masterfilms, Inc. 130 West 
46th St. : For X. Y. and Northern X. J. : Skin- 
ner's Dress Suit, Skinner's Baby, Golden Idiot, 
Fools for Luck, Small Town Guy, Efficiency 
Edgar's Courtship, The Alster Case. Little Shoes 
Misleading Lady, Young Mother Hubbard, Man 
Trail, Little Shepherd of Bargain Row, Men of 
the Desert. Range Boss, Land of Long Shadows. 
Open Places. Stripped for a Million, When Ari- 
zona Won, Pen Vulture, Denny from Ireland 
The Ranger. The Snail, 10 one reel Broncho 
Billys, 12 two reel subjects Do Children Count, 
9 split reel subjects — educational, 5 Charlie Chap- 
lins, ill Rogers Illiterate Digest, Jack Gardiner's 
Gift of Gali, 12 two reel Blazed Trail subjects. 

Gardiner Pictures, 729 Seventh Ave. (Also 47 
W. Swan St.. Buffalo; 4 Clinton Ave.. Albany.) 
Mickey, Tillie's Punctured Romance, The Birth 
of a Race, The Married Virgin, Silk Hushangs 
and Calico Wives, Yankee Doodle in Berlin, The 
Lost Battalion, Everybody's Business. Virtuous 
Man, The Superman, The Scared Flame, The 
Borgain, Staking His Life, The Bandit and the 
Preacher, The Hell Hound of Alaska, Satan's 
I'awn, The Straight Road, A Dream of Fair 
Women, The Real Roosevelt, Custer's Last 
Fight, Satan on Earth, Charlie Chaplin comedits. 
Mack Sennett comedies, Sennet Keystone com 
edies, Fatty Arbuckle comedies, Wm. S. Hart 
westerns, Shorty Hamilton westerns, Kay- Bee 
Westerns. 

Reelcraft Pictures Corp., 729 Seventh Ave.: 9 



one reel William Franey comedies; 15 one tee) 
Billy West comedies ; 7 two reel Alice Howell 
comedies; 11 two reel Milburn Moranti comedies; 
3 one reel Burrud (Sunset) scenics ; 15 two reel 
Texas Guinan Westerns; 10 one reel Xapoleon 
& Sally comedies; 12 two reel Gale Henry 
comedies. 

Merit Film Corp., 130 West 46 St.: Hall Room 
Boy comedies, 2 reels, released every other week ; 
1 two reel comedy every week ; 1 one reel 
comedy every week. Following two reel dramas: 
Texas Guinan series, Helen Gibson series ; Lone 
Star series, Kathlyn Williams series, Franklyn 
Farnum Canyon series, The Gump Cartoon re- 
leased every week ; 1 reel scenic released every 
other week. Serials: Mystery of 13 starring 
Francis Ford and The Hawk's Trad starring 
King Baggot. 

N. J. Rolfe Film Co.. 729 Seventh Ave. (N. J 
distributors for Jans and Equity Productions ) 
For Northern New* Jersey: The Eyes of * outh_ 
The Forbidden Woman The Soul of Raphael, Mid 
Channel, Love without Question, A Woman s 
Business, Wing's of Pride, Silk Husbands and 
Calico Wives, Echo of Youth, Ashes of Love. 
When Men Betray, Unpardonable Sin, Hearts ot 
Men, Stolen Orders, 20,000 Leagues Under the 
Sea, Even as You and T, Witching Hour, Houdmi 
serial, Ham and Bud comedies. For entire New 
Jersey: Witching Hour. 20,000 Leagues Under 
the Sea, Hearts of Men and Unpardonable Sin. 

Famous Picture Sales Co., 729 Seventh Ave : 
Someone Must Pay, The Echo of Youth The 
Red Viper, It Happened in Paris, Mother Love 
and the Law, The Little Orphan, Five Nights, 
Your Wife and Mine, Human Passions, 1 he 
Eternal Penalty, Roses and Thorns, She Pays, 
lustice. Days of Daring. The Guilty Woman, 
"Tohnnv Dooley comedies. The Log of the U-35. 
6 sing'le reel comedies starring Billy Parsons and 
Constance Talmadge, 20 two reel Helen Holmes 

SU w eC H Productions Co.. 71 West 23 St.: Two 
reel Mack Sennett Keystone Comedies; 4 Two 
reel and 22 one reel Chaplins; 28 one reel Key- 
stone Liberty comedies; 28 one reel Keystone 
Eagle comedies; 15 Two reel Shorty Hamiltons; 
24 One Reel Fatty Arbuckles; 15 Two reel Kay- 
bee Union; 15 Two reel Kaybee Columbia. Also 
Tower Film Corp., as follows: The Bargain, 
The Bandit & The Preacher, and Hell Hound of 
Alaska. 6 reels each; Dakota Dan Oouble 
Crossed The Last Card, A Knight of The I rail, 
A Square Deal, Horns & Hoofs. The Bad Man, 
The Fugitive, The Gentlemen From Blue Gulch, 
The Silent Stranger, The Marked Deck. The 
Haters, Taming the Fourflusher, Mr. Nobody, 
Over the Great Divide, A Reformed Outlaw, 2 
reels each. And 11 one reel and 1 two reel New 
Fatty Arbuckle Series; 12 one reel Arbuckle 
Comedies, K Brand; 18 one reel Keystones, 6 
One reel Kid Pictures, 2 Two reel Harts, Custer s 
Last Fight (3 reels), 2 one reel Chaplins. 

Aywon Film Corp., 729 Seventh Ave. : Blind 
Love, Evolution of Man, The Woman Beyond 
Reproach (6 reels). Unknown Ranger, Dangerous 
Trails, Border Raiders (5 reels); Joy Comedies, 
15 two reelers; Harry Carey, IS two reelers; 
He'en Holmes. 20 two reelers. 

Jacob Wilk, 1476 Broadway: Ashes of Desire. 

Empire State Film Corp., 729 Seventh Ave. : 
For Xew York and Xew Jersey: Tex Elucidator 
of "Mysteries; 12; one every month; first three 
released ■ — Circumstantial Evidence, Wall St. 
Mystery and Unseen Witness, Next three — Trail 
of the Cigarette, The Bromley Case and The 
Sacred Ruby. 5 reels each. ; Also The Chamber 
Mystery, Wolves of the Street. Woman's Man — 

5 reels. The Vigilantes and Desert Scorpion — 6 
reels. 26 two reel Hank Mann Comedies : 26 
Screen Snapshots; 26 Charles Urban Movie 
Chats; 26 Tales of the Tropics; 12 Northwoods 
Dramas (2 reels) ; 15 episode Serial "The Woman 
in Grey." 

Peerless Picture Co. — The Heart of a Woman. 

Frank Gersten, 130 West 46 St.: For Northern 
New Jersey: Blindness of Youth, Someone Must 
Pay, The Heart of Texas Ryan; 12 two reels 
Franklyn Farnum subjects; 15 two reel Neal 
Hart subjects; 15 two reel Al Jennings subjects; 

6 Bill Parsons and Constance Talmadge single 
reel comedies. 



157 



HAROLD LLOYD COMEDIES 

Consistently Good Since 1914 and Getting Better All The Time 




HAROLD LLOYD HAL ROACH 

Producer and Director 



HAL ROACH STUDIOS CULVER CITY, CALIFORNIA 



158 



Arrow Film Corp., 220 West 42nd St. : Fea- 
tures: Woman's Man; Love's Protege; Daughter 
of the Don ; Tex. Elucidator of Mysteries (series 
of 12 rive reel detective pictures) ; The Desert 
Scorpion ; Wolves of the Street ; The Chamber of 
Mystery; The Vigilanties ; Before the White Man 
lame Short Subjects: The Lurking Peril 
(15 episode serial); The Fatal Sign (14 episdoe 
serial). Two reel Western dramas: Blazed Trail, 
The North voods Drama and Border Pictures. 
One and two reel comedies: Arrow one reel; 
Hank Mann 10 one reelers ; Sunbeam two reelers, 
26 Han). Mann two reelers; 12 two reelers with 
Munal Ostriche; 8 two reel Xlnt comedies. 
Novelties : Exploits of the German Raider 
"Moewe," 2 reels; The Nation's Mirror, 12 two 
reel Americanization pictures issued one a month. 

Territorial Sales Corp., 1600 Broadway : Follow- 
ing Jester Comedies, It's a Great Life, Some 
Baby, Ain't It So, The Recruit, In the Wild 
West, A Mexican Mixup, Can you Beat It, Bus- 
iness without pleasure, All fur her. Fly ball, 
Wrong fiat, Oh what a day, The tenderfoot, Gee 
whiz. Framed up, You're Next, In the Swim, 
Almost Married, Camouflage, .Golden Romance, 
He Wins. Fatal Flower, Peace and Riot, The 
wisest fool. She me, Chickens in Turkey. 

Samuel Cummins, 1476 Broadway : Some Wild 
Oats. 

Merit Film Corp., 130 West 46 St.: For N Y 
State and Northern N. J. : Who's to Blame, 
Repentance, A Wife's Story, Truth Will Prevail 
Like an Old Fool, Fool's Gold, Once to Every 
Man, The She Wolf, Heart of Texas Ryan, Brown 
of Harvard, The Square Shooter, The Window 
Opposite, Mother I Need You; Serials: The 
Silent Mystery, The Mystery of 13 and The 
Hawks Trail; 2 reel comedies: Hall Room Boys, 
Jester, Romayne Bear Cat, Triangle; 1 reel 
comedies : Mack Swain, Hank Mann, George 
Ovey, Briggs; dramas: Texas Guinan westerns, 
Helen Gibson railroad, Kathlyn Williams animal, 
Lone Star, Canyon (Franklin Farnum) ; The 
dumps ; Globe Trots, scenics. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

CHARLOTTE, N. C— 

Eltabran Film Co. Piedmont Theater Bldg — 
Serials: Woman in Grey, The Hawk's Trail, The 
Liberator, Hand of Vengeance. 24 Vera Mack 
westerns, 12 two reel Texas Guinan, 12 two reel 
Northwoods westerns, 16 two reel Kathlyn Wil- 
liams jungle, 16 two reel Tom Mix westerns, 12 
one reel Tom Mix westerns, 40 one reel Tom 
Mix westerns, 15 two reel Shorty Hamiltons. 50 
one reel Ham & Bud comedies, 24 two reel Jes- 
ters, 24 two reel Billy West comedies, 24 two 
reel Moranti, 20 .one reel Ambrose comedies. 

OHIO 

CINCINNATI, O.— 

Wilson Film Co., Broadway Film Bldg.— For 
S. Ohio and Ky. — Serials, comedies, short west- 
erns; Farnum, Guinan and Carev 2 reel western-, 
Joy comedies, Poppy comedies, Williams 2 reel 
Jungle pictures. 

The Federated Film Exchange Company, Film 
Exchange, Seventh and Main Streets — distribut- 
ing the product of The Federated Film Exchanges 
of America, Inc., including Monty Banks com- 
edies. Nobody's Girl, a Billy Rhodes feature, and 
a series of features, comedies and serials dis- 
tribution through standard film in Southern Ohio 
and Kentucky. 

Standard Film Service Company, Film Ex- 
change, Seventh and Main Streets, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, — Harry L Charnas, general manager, Not. 
L. Lefkowitz, manager, member Federated Film 
Exchanges of America, Inc., distributing Fed- 
erated product, including Monty Banks comedies. 
Nobody's Girl, a Billy Rhodes, feature, and a 
series of features, comedies and serials; also dis- 
tributing the product of The Educational Film 
( o., including Will Rogers, Illiterate Digest, Ur- 
bans Movie Chats Tom Bret's Topical Jazz 
monologue, Screen Snapshots, Gaumont Pictorial 
Life and Motoy cinema dolls; also distributing 
Hank Mann, Hall Hoom Boys, Alice Howell, 
Muriel Ostriche, Gale Henry, Christie Special, 



Billy West, Jester, Sunbeam, Bobby Burns, Ma- 
jestic and Briggs two reel comedies, Franey, 
Gayety Christie, Briggs, Majestic. Capital, Ar- 
buckle, Keystone, Jungle and Kid one reel com- 
edies, Tom Mix one reel Westerns, North Woods 
two reel dramas, Depths of the Sea, U-35, The 
End of the Road, Open Y° ur Eyes and Fit to 
Win, specials, and The Lost City, The Carter 
Case, The Masked Rider, Lightning Bryce, The 
Lurking Peril, The Tiger Band, and a Woman 
in Grey, serials, territory, Southern Ohio and 
Kentucky. 

Masterpiece Pictures Co. Film Exchange 
Bldg. — For Ohio and Kentucky — The House 
Without Children, Sky Eye, Hearts of Men, 
Once to Every man, Yankee Doodle in Berlin, 
Love without Question, Frivolous Wives. 

The Educational Film Company, Film Ex- 
change, Seventh & Main Sts. — Illiterate Digest, 
Movie Chats, Topical Jazz, Gaumont, Pictorial 
Life, and Motoy cinema dolls: distribution 
through Standard Film Service Company, Film 
Exchange, Cincinnati, O., for Southern Ohio 
and Kentucky. 
CLEVELAND, OHIO — 

Sterling Service & Amusement Co., Sloan 
Bldg. — One Law for Both, Married in Name 
Only, Babbling Tongues, Sins of Ambition, Two 
Men and a Woman, Modern Lorelei, Human 
Clay, Woman Who Dared, My Husband's 
Friend. Also George Kleine and Special Pic- 
tures Corp., productions. 

The Federated Film Exchange Company, Sloan 
Bldg. — distributing the product of the Federated 
Film Exchanges of America, Inc. t including 
Monty Banks comedies. Nobody's Girl, A Billy 
Rhodes feature, and a series of features, com- 
edies and serials, distribution through Standard 
Film Service Co., in Northern Ohio. 

The Educational Film Company, Sloan Bldg — 
releasing Will Rogers, Illiterate Digest, Urban'* 
Movie Chats, Tom Bret's Topical Jazz, mono- 
logue. Screen Snapshots, Gaumont Pictorial Life 
and Motoy Cinema dolls: distribution through 
Standard Film Service Co., Sloan Bldg., Cleve- 
land, O., for Northern Ohio. 

Standard Film Service Co., Sloan Bldg. — 
Harry L. Charnas, general manager, M. A. 
Lebensburger, manager : member Federated Film 
Exchanges of America, Inc., distributing Feder- 
ated product, including Monty Banks comedies. 
Nobody's Girl a Billy Rhodes feature, and a 
series of features, comedies and serials ; also dis- 
tributing the product of The Educational Film 
Co., including Will Roger's Illiterate Digest, 
Urbans Movie Chats, Tom Bret's Topical Jazz 
monologue, Screen Snapshots, Gaumont Pic- 
torial Life and Motoy cinema dolls; also dis- 
tributing Hank Mann, Hall Room Boys. Alice 
Howell, Muriel Ostriche, Gale Henry, Christie 
Special, Billy West, Jester, Sunbea|m. Bobby 
Burns, Majestic and Briggs two reel comedies, 
Franey. Gayety, Christie. Briggs, Majestic, Capital, 
Arbuckle, Keystone, Jungle and Kid one reel 
comedies; Tom Mix one reel westerns and com- 
edies ; William S. Hart and Texas Guinan two 
reel westerns : North Woods two reel dramas, 
"Depths of the Sea, U-35. The End of the 
Road. Open Your Eyes, and Fit to Win, specials, 
and the Lost City, The Carter Case, The Masked 
Rider, Lightning Bryce, The Lurking Peril, The 
Tiger Band and A Woman in Grey, serials, Ter- 
ritory, Northern Ohio. 

Masterpiece Pictures Co., Standard Theater 
Bldg. (also Film Exchange Bldg., Cincinnati) — 
Love Without Question. A Woman's Business, 
Wings of Pride, House Without Children. Hearts 
of Men, Once to Every Man, Yankee Doodle in 
Berlin and Sky Eye. 

OKLAHOMA 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK LA. — 

R. D. Lewis Film Co., 112 S. Hudson St. — 
Open your Eyes, The Greater Sinner, Husbands 
and Wives, The Great White Trail. Submarine 
U-35, 12 Tex Features, 8 Neal Hart features, 5 
Shorty Hamilton features. Men of the West, In 
the Days of Daring. Short specials : Satan on 
Earth, The Real Roosevelt, Masonic News. 



159 



TOM FORMAN Directing 

PARAMOUNT ARTCRAFT FEATURES 

Current Release: 

"SINS OF ROSANNE" 

LASKY STUDIOS HOLLYWOOD 



160 



Serials: Hawks Trail, Lightning Bryce, Masked 
Rider, Hand of Vengeance. Westerns: Al- Jen- 
nings, Neal Hart, Helen Gibson, Lone Star, Wal- 
lace C'oburn. Comedies: Billy West, Gale Henry, 
Alice Howell, Milhurn Moranti, Billy Franey, 
Christie. Novelties: Gumps, Pictorial Life, Vod- 
A-Vil. Federated Exchanges of America, Inc. : 
Nobody's Child; Polly Moran, Monte Banks, 
Smiling Bill Jones and Ben Turpin comedies. 
Tucker Bros. — Fickle Women. 

OREGON 

PORTLAND, ORE.— 

Oregon Film Exchange, 390 Burnside St. — 
The Bar Sinister, Calibre 38, The Fringe of 
Society, The Sin Woman, Twilight, The Fall of 
Barbary Coast, Street of Seven Stars, Inn of 
the Blue Moon, Wild Honey, Great White Trail, 
Romance of the Underworld, Marriage, Out of the 
Night, Marriage for Convenience, Love and the 
Law, Red Blood and Yellow, The Son of a Gun, 
Shooting Mad, The Naked Hand, One Hour, The 
Cast-Off, The Silent Witness, The Belgian, Zep- 
pelin's Last Raid, Just a Woman, The Natural 
Law, The Girl who Doesn't Know, Web of In- 
trigue, Miss Arizona, Power of Evil, In the 
Hands of the Law, Web of Life, Would You 
Forgive? The Locked Heart, No Children Wanted, 
Billy West comedies, Topical Tips, Mutt and 
Jeff Cartoons, Jolly comedies. 

Equity Distributing Co., 403 Davis St. : For 
Orel., Wash., Idaho and Mont. : Eyes of Youth, 
Forbidden Woman, Soul of Rafael, Mid Chan- 
nell. Long Arm of Mannister, Atonement, Dr. 
Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, Bubbles, The Boomerang, 
Silk Husbands and Calico Wives, Tillie's Punctured 
Romance, The Confession, Husbands & Wives. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

PHILADELPHIA, PA.— 

Keystone Distributing Corp., 1134 Vine St.: 
Napoleon & Sally Monkey 2 reel comedies. Gale 
Henry 2 reelers, Billy West 2 reelers, A Woman 
in Grey (serial), The Garden of Allah, Raffles, 
The Accidental Honeymoon, The Struggle Ever- 
lasting, Gold Deck, Mad Lover, Today, Wrath of 
the Gods. 

De Luxe Film Co., 1325 Vine St.: The Window 
Opposite, The Unhappy Wife, The Square Shooter, 
The Days of Daring, Blind Love, The Country 
That God Forgot, Neglected Wives, Spring- 
time. 

B-B Film Distributors, Inc., 1333 Vine St.: 
Tillie Wakes Up (Marie Dressier, 5 reels), Hearts 
in Exile, Souls Adrift, The Man of the Hour, 
Maternity, The Hidden Scar, Friday the 13th, 
The Trap, Butterfly on the Wheel, The Pawn of 
Fate, Human Driftwood, The Closed Road, Whims 
of Society, Dancer's Peril. 

Royal Pictures, Inc., 1237 Vine St.: Love With- 
out Question, Frivolous Wives, Love's Protege, 
The Hushed Hour, The Key to Power, Gump 
cartoons. Mother I Need You, What Becomes 
of the Children. 

Monarch Film Corp., 1238 Vine St. : The War- 
rior, Lust of the Ages, House of Temperley, 
Blood of his Fathers, Behind the Mast, $5,000,000 
counterfeit Plot, Daughter of War, Miss Decep- 
tion, Buhela, Invisible Power, Around the world 
in 80 days, Comedies, Weeklies, etc. 

Electric Theater Supply Co., 1309 Vine St.: 
Educational Film Corp.'s products, • also Christie 
one reelers, Gayety comedies, Kartoons, Photo- 
play Magazine, Bruce scenics, Screenics, Gau- 
mont Weekly, Tom Mix one reel westerns, 
t hristie 2 reel specials, Romayne 2 reel comedies, 
Outing Chesters, Keystone 1 reelers and Wm. S. 
Hart 2 reel westerns. 

Twentieth Century Film Co., 1337 Vine St • 
Shepherd of the Hills, The Stranger, Sky Eye, 
Yankee Doodle in Berlin, Spoilers, Tillie's ' Punct- 
ured Romance, Staking His Life, 5 Charlie Cliap- 
lins. The Hawk's Trail (serial) and 2 reel Jester 
comedies. 

Capital Film Exchange,. 1314 Vine St.: Neal 
Hart 2 reel westerns, Al Jennings 2 reel wes- 
terns, Pendelton Round-Up, The Lady of the 
Dugout, Mysterious Mr. Browning, Sherry pic- 
tures, Tyrad pictures, comedies, Helen Gibson 
series. 

Screen-Art Pictures, 1331 Vine St.: Virtuous 
Aien, Heart of Texas Ryan, Somone Must Pay, 



Blindness of Youth. Sacred Elaine. Through Eyes 
of Men, The Inner Voice, Men of the West. 

Peerless Feature Film Exchange, Inc., 1339 
Vine St. : First National Exhibitors' Circuit pic- 
tures and Associated First National Pictures, Inc. 
Also The Unpardonable Sin. 

Superior Film Exchange. Inc., 251 N. 13th St. 
Carmen of the Klondike for E. Penn., Sins of 
Ambition for So. N. J. and E. Penn., Echo of 
Youth and Ashes of Love for E. Penn., and So. 
N. J., Vod-A-Vil Movies and Husbands and Wives 
and Franklyn Farnum 2 reel westerns for E. 
Penn. and So. N. J., Custer's Last Fight and 
Once to Every Man for E. Penn. and So. N. J., in- 
cluding Trenton, 24 Mack Sennett Keystone re- 
issues for E. Penn. and So. N. J., Gaumont Pic- 
torial Lift- tor E. Penn. and S. N. J., including 
Trenton. 

Masterpiece Film Attractions, 1235 Vine St : 
For Penn. and So. N. J.: The Boomerang, Sins 
of the Children, Long Arm of Mannister, Atone- 
ment, The Girl from Nowhere, Suspicion, Vir- 
tuous Sinners, Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, Bubbles ; 
to come : Hidden Code, Midnight Gambols, 
Place of Honeymoons, Nobody's Child. 26 Hall 
Room Boys, 26 Billy Wests, 26 Hank Mann, 10 
Gale Henry, 26 Alice Howell. 26 Arbuckle, 9 
single reel Hank Manns, 52 single reel Atlas Edu- 
cational weekly, 26 Screen Snapshots, Stecher 
& Caddock wrestling match : For E. Penn. So. N. 
J., Del., Md. and D. C. ; Eyes of Youth. For- 
bidden Woman, For the Soul of Rafael and Mid- 
Channel. 

Consolidated Film Co., 1237 Vine St. — For 
Eastern Penn and So. N. J. — Alma Where Do 
You Live, Crimson Shoals. Why Tell, The Man's 
Trail, Gift of Gab. Shepherd of Bargain Row, 
Men of the Desert, The Range Boss, Open Places, 
Efficiency FMgar's Courtship, Little Shoes, Alster 
Case, Valley of the Night, Burning Silence, Sin- 
ner's Three, Barrier Between, Greyhound, Road 
of Tears, Skinner's Dress Suit, Mystery_ of 13 
(serial), Ben Turpin re-issues, Pokes and Jabs 
re-issues, Briggs comedies. 
PITTSBURGH, PA.— 

All-Star Film Co., 412 Ferry St.: For Western 
Penn. and W. Va. : The Trap, The man of the 
Hour, a Woman Alone, The Stolen Voice, Ma- 
ternity, Friday the 13th, The Dancer's Peril, 
Family Honor, Souls Adrift, Pawn of Fate, 
Hidden Scar, Closed Road, Divorce Game. Feast 
of Life, Man Who Forgot, Whims of Society, 
Hand of Peril, Husband and Wife, Butterfly on 
the Wheel, Woman's Way, Almighty Dollar, 
Human Dritfwood. Should a Wife Forgive. Ivory 
Snuff Box, Hungry Heart, His Brother's Wife. 

Apex Pictures, Inc., 414 Penn. Ave. : Still 
Alarm, The Whip, Tempest & Sunshin, Girl 
From Nowhere, Civilization, Birth of a Race. 
Road of Tears, Barrier Between, Vengeance of 
the Wild, Crimson Shoals, Mother Love & The 
Law, The Square Shooter, Demon's Shadow 
(serial), Chaplin re-issues. Series of 12 two reel 
Franklyn Farnum westerns, 12 Arrow one reel 
comedies, Gumps cartoons. 

Standard Film Exchange, 412 Ferry St.: One 
and two reel Mack Sennett comedies, one and 
two reel Arbuckle comedies, one and two reel 
Chaplin comedies, two reel Twede Dan Jester 
comedies, one reel Ham and Bud comedies; ser- 
ials: Mystery of 13, Masked Rider and Vanish- 
ing Trail. 

S. & S. Film and Supply Co., Inc., 414 Penn. 
Ave. : Following 2 reel comedies : Facts and Fol- 
lies, Bill Franey, Alice Howell. Millburn Mor- 
anti, May Roubert ; 2 reel westerns: Neal Hart. 
Helen Gibson, Al Jennings, Texas Guinan ; 
Stecher-Caddock 3 reel world's championship 
bout, Pendleton Roundup (2 reels), George Kleine 
productions. Mysterious Mr. Browning, Once to 
Every Man, Lady of the Doubout, series of 8 
five reel Neal Harts westerns, series of 8 five 
reel Roy Stewart, Pioneer Productions, dis- 
tributors of entire output of Independent Film 
Assoc. 

First National Exhibitors' Exchange, 414 Ferry 
St.: All First National Pictures, all F^quity Pic- 
tures, Jans Pictures, Al St. John comedies. Hall 
Room Boys comedies and Gaumont News reels. 



161 



1? 



Leander de Cordova 



Directing 



METRO SPECIALS 



162 



Simlec Film Co., 412 Ferry St.: Ramona, Eyes 
of the World, Why Tell, Lurking Peril (serial). 
Sins of Children, Your Wife and Mine, Atone- 
ment, Virtuous Sinners, Heart of Jungle, Mor- 
mon Maid, Some Gal, Miss Deputy, Diplomatic 
Ambrose, Ambrose Vacation, Baffled Ambrose, 
Raffles. 

Supreme Photoplay Productions, 1201 Liberty 
Et. : Mickey. 

Co-Partner Attractions, Inc., 1010 Forbes St.: 
Who Shall Take My Life, Virtuous Men, And 
the Children Pay, Alma Where Do You Live, 
Brown of Harvard, Human Passions, Following 
comedies: Hearts and Arts, Some Mind Reader, 
Skinning Skinners, Pep, Series of 15 one reel 
Indian dramas featuring Mona Darkfeather. 

Standard Film Exchange, 412 Ferry St — For 
Western Penn. and W. Va. — Ham and Bud Com- 
edies, Arbuckle comedies,- Chaplin comedies, Mack 
Sennett comedies, Twede Dan Jester comedies, 
Travelogues, Masked Rider Serial, Mystery of 13, 
Vanishing Trails serial. The Spoilers, Tillie's 
Punctured Romance and Captivating Mary Car- 
stairs. Deposit on Son of Tarzan (serial), also 
releasing about 50 re-issued Geo. Kleine features. 
Mutual and Triangle companies. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GREENVILLE. S. C— 

Imperial Film Service, Bijou Theater Bldg. : For 
N. and S. C. — Alster Case, Pants, No Greater 
Love, The Girl from Rector's, At Piney Ridge 
Driftwood, Love's Law, Curious Conduct of Judge 
Legard, A Man and the Woman, The Curse, 
single and two reel westerns, comedies and dramas. 

TENNESSEE 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. — 

Special Features Co. 609 Market St. : Ban^.. 
and the Preacher, Hellhound of Alaska, Lion oi 
the Hills, She Wolf, Staking his Life, Once to 
Every Man, Stolen Orders, Modern Lorelie, The 
Whip, Still Alarm, Raffles, Everybody's Busings. 
Superman, 24 Keystone comedies, 26 Romayne 
comedies, 24 Texas Guinan, 24 Vera Mack west- 
erns, 12 Northwood dramas, 16 Kathlyn Williams 
Jungle dramas. Hawks Trail and A Woman in 
Grey (serials). 
MEMPHIS, TENN. — 

Kaufman Specials, 52 South Fourth St. : Reg- 
ularly releasing Neal Hart and Al Jennings 2 
reel westerns each week alternately for Ky.. 
Tenn. ; also new print of 1 and 2 reel Chaplin* 
Also Lafayette We Come, Tom Mix 1 reel West- 
erns; Ham & Bud, Lko., and Pokes and Jabs 
comedies; 5 episodes Fantomas ; 7 episodes 
Seven Deadly Sins; 12 episodes serials Daughter 
of Uncle Sam ; Hazards of Helen, Heinie and 
Louie, 1 reel comedies; Following Capital Film 
Co., re-issues: 5 Bushman-Bayne subjects, A 
Bryant Washburn subjects, 3 Broncho Billy sub- 
jects; 3 Helen Gibson railroad subjects; 2 James 
T. Corbett subjects. 

TEXAS 

DALLAS, TEX.— 

Southwestern Film Corp., 1911 Commerce St. — 
Super Specials — The Red Viper, The Curse of 
Eve, Finger of Justice, Frivolous Wives; Class 
A: When the Desert Smiled, Woman's Law, 
Once to Every Man, The She Wolf, Mysterious 
Mr. Browning, Accidental Honeymoon, Stripped 
for a Million, Strife, Apple Tree Girl, Coas- 
sack Whip; Class B: Miss Arizona, Sunset 
Princess, Awakening of Ruth, Lady of the Photo- 
graph, Innocence of Ruth, One Touch of Nature, 
Builders of Castles, Law of the North; Class C: 
The C urse, Catspaw, Master Passion, Green 
<"Ioak, Magic Skin; 2 reel Texas Guinan, Mack 
Swain Poppy Comedies, Hall Room Boys, Serials : 
Carter Case, Silent Mystery ; Jazz Monologue. 
Jaxon comedies; 16 two reel Tom Mix, Gayety 
Comedies, Outing-Chester scenics. Also follow 
ing • 5 reel features: Husbands Honor, Reputa 
tion. Queen X, Her Second Husband, Treason. 
Daughter of Maryland, Who Loved Him Best 
Love's Law, Dare Devil, Social Briars, Ghost of 
Rosy Taylor, Square Deal, Impossible Susan, 
Mystery Rivera, Father and Son, Lafayette We 
Come, pardners, Girl of My Dreams, Eleventh 
Commandement, Wall St, Tragedy, Up Romance 
Road, Wasted Years. 



True Film Co., 191 \y% Commerce St.— For 
Tex., Ark. and Okla. : Al St. John Comedies, 
Yankee Doodle in Berlin, The Whip, Hearts oi 
the World, Masque of Life, Modern Lorelei. 

Southern States Film Co., 1900 Commerce St. — 
For Tex., Okla. and Ark. : Just a Woman, Those 
Who Pay, Her Fighting Chance, The Belgian, 
prodigal Wife, Crucible of Life, Zeppelin's Last 
Raid, Also number of Chaplin re-issues. 

R. D. Lewis Film Co., 1913^2 Commerce St. — 
2 reel westerns: Al Jennings, Neal Hart, Helen 
Gibson, Harry Meyers, Wallace Coleman ; 2 reel 
comedies : Bulls Eye, Gail Henry, Billy West, 
Alice Howell ; Gumps cartoons ; Gaumont News 
and Gaumont Graphic ; Gaumont Pictorial Life ; 
Features: The Snail, The Ranger, The Pen Vul- 
ture. When Arizonia Won, Days of Daring, 
Husbands and Wives, The Greater Sinner, No- 
body's Girl ; Serials : Hawk's Trail, Crimson 
Stain Mystery, Masked Rider. 

Emergency Film Service, 1810 Commerce St. — 
For Tex., Okla. and Ark. : Lightning Bryce, 
Raven, Alma Where Do Y°" Live, Crimson 
Ehoals, Unknown Ranger, Dangerous Trails, 
Border Raiders, 11 Tom Moore 2 reel dramas, 
26 one reel Mona Darkfeather Indian dramas, 21 
Christi Outing pictures, Emergency service. 

Parker Film Co., Dallas. — (For Texas, Okla, 
and Ark.) Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, Bubbles, Mid- 
night Gambols, Hidden Code, What Women Want, 
Place of Honeymoons, Nobody's Child. 

Southern States Film Co., 1900 Commerce St. — 
The Screaming Shadow (serial), The Square 
Shooter, Are You Legally Married, Parted Cur- 
tains and For Love of Money. 
SAN ANTONIO, TEX.— 

Independent Film Exchange, 204 Frost Bldg. : 
The Folly of a Life of Crime, one reel comedies 
and two reel comedies, one and two reel western 
subjects, serials. 

UTAH 

SALT LAKE CITY.— 

McDermond Theater Amusement Co., Inc., No. 

12 Post Office Place — Robertson- Cole produc- 
tions; Equity productions including four C. K. 
Young's; Husbands and Wives, Days of Daring, 
Romance Road, Social Briars, The Ghost of Rosy 
Taylor, Impossible Susan, A Square Deal, Un- 
pardonable Sin. Hushed Hour, The Hearts of 
Men, The Clean Gun. 26 comedies one a week; 
10 Ham and Bud; 6 Keystone reissues; 2 Charlie 
Chaplins; Billie Rhodes 1 reel comedies. 

WASHINGTON 

SEATTLE, WASH.— 

Robinson-Walker Co.. Ltd., Arctic Bldg. — 
Primarily interested in purchase of pictures for 
Orient. Exchange in Shanghai. Occasional pic- 
tures for local territory especially those available 
for Seattle territory and China. 

Greater Features Inc., 2020 Third Ave. : Fool's 
Gold, Sinners, Are You Legally Married, Wives 
of Men, Shorty Hamilton 5 reelers, The Deem- 
ster, Stripped for a Million, The Law of Nature, 
Strife, The Jungle Princess, Beware of Strangers, 
Superman, The Mysterious Mr. Browning, Eyes 
of the World. Serials: The Lost City, Tiger 
Band, Fatal Fortune, The Liberator. Comedies : 
Al St. John 2 reelers. Hall Room Boys, Billy 
West, Christie specials, Alice Howell, Jester, 
Hank Mann 1 and 2 reelers. Gale Henry, Chris- 
tie 1 reelers. Gaiety 1 reelers. Monkey comedies, 
International cartoons. Novelties etc: Bill 
Rogers Illiterate Digest, Vodavil movies, Stars 
as they are, Chester Outing, Bruce Scenics, Gau- 
mont Pictorial Life, Gaumont News and Graphic, 
Ditmar Animal educationals. Also Keystone, 
Chaplin and Arbuckle reissues. 

Supreme Photoplays Corp.: 52 Brady master 
feature productions, 12 Kleine specials, 52 Gump 
cartoons, Rothacker Atlas Industrialogue, Once 
to Every Man, Desert Scorpion, Wolves of the 
Street, Custer's Last Fight, Heart of Texas 
Ryan, Texas Guinan 2 reelers, Franey one reel 
comedies. Millburn Moranti two reel comedies. 

De Luxe Feature Film Co., 2014 Third Ave.: 
Hearts of the World, Shepherd of the Hills (for 
Ore. and Wash, only), Mickey, Yankee Doodle 
in Berlin, Fall of Babylon, Mother and the Law, 
Birth of a Race, End of the Road, Woman, Curse 
of Eve, When the Desert Smiled, The Whip, The 



163 



Harry Carey as "Sundown Slim" 

A simple soul, the child of circumstance 

He seeks adventure in the starlight dim, 

Like Dox Quixote of the old romance 

Battling the world again, as Sundown Slim. 

Unknown, alone, a vagrant of the night 

Thrust by the hand of Fate from place to place 

He plods with patient stride, his eyes alight 
With untold longing tor a friendly face. 

Touched by the mute appeal of helpless hands 
He rises like a giant through the stress 

Champions the right — and at the last he stands 
Still undefeated in his loneliness. 

By Henrv Herbert Knibbs 



164 



Spoilers (Ore., Wash, and Idaho), Carmen of 
the Klondike, Nine Tenths of the Law, Grain of 
Dust, 1919 Pendleton Roundup, The Square 
.Shooter, The Italian. Tom Mix two reelers. 

W. S. Brewster Attractions, 2016 Third Ave.: 
Kor Wash.. Ore., Idaho and Mont.: Birth of a 
Nation. The Crisis, Ramona. Masque of Life, The 
Warrior. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

CHARLESTON, W. VA.— 

Gilmore Picture Exchange, 920 Quarrier St. — 
Civilization. Still Alarm, Road to Tears, Crim- 
son Shoals, Spoilers of Souls. Ignorance. Tempest 
and Sunshine. Barrier Between. Girl From No- 
where. Mothers Love and the Law, Demon 
Shadows (serial). Stolen Fortune( serial), 12 two 
reel western I Franklin Farnum), 12 American 
single reel comedies, 3 Chaplins. ignorance. 

WISCONSIN 

MILWAUKEE. WIS.— 

Mid-West Distributing Co. Toy Bldg.: Hearts 
of Men, The Confession, Husbands and Wives 
Crimson Shoals, The Square Shooter, 1 and 2 
reel Christie comedies, Gayety comedies, Cub 
comedies, Jolly comedies. The Carter Case, The 
Fatal F'ortune. The Lost City, When the Desert 
Smiled, Two reel Texas Guinas. Two reel Tom 
Mix subjects. 

Reelcraft Pictures Corp., 174 Second St.: 
Comedies: 12 Arbuckle re-issues, Alice Howell 
Billy West. Billy Franey, Charles Chaplin re- 
issues, Gale Henry, Moranti ; Features: The Red 
Viper : Serials : A Woman in Grey ; Western 
dramas; Al Jennings, Xeal Hart, Texas Guinan 

Walter A. Baier Film Co., 412 Toy Bldg: 
Hearts of the World. The Vigilantes, Wolves of 
the Street, Once to Every Man. The Great White 
Trail, The Desert Scorpion, Fool's Gold, The 
Natural Law. Heart of Texas Ryan, 12 Tex 
detective drama. (5 reels each). The Finger of 
Justice, Snakeville comedies. Series of 2 reel 
Helen Gibson railroad dramas. Sky Eye. 

Wisconsin Film Corp., 403 Toy Bldg. : For 
Wis : Serials : Lightning Bryce. Lurking Peril : 
Eyes of Youth. Forbidden Woman. Soul of 
Rafael. Mid-Channel. Mickey, Lost Battalion. 
Birth of a Nation, 6 Win. Hart subjects ; Satan's 
Pawn, Carmen of the Klondike, Everybody's Bus- 
iness, Superman, Tillie's Punctured Romance 
Some Nerve. Custer's Last Fight, Love Without 
Ouestion. 

CANADA 

Regal Films Ltd., Temple Bldg. Toronto. — Old 
Triangle features; World productions, Metro and 
Screen ('lassie productions, Realart Productions. 

Exhibitors Distributing Corp., 21 Dundas St., 
East, Toronto . For Dominion of Canada. — 
Entire Robertson- Cole output, Supreme Strand 
comedies. Gaumont News, Gaumont Pictorial 
Life. Serials: Lost City, Lightning Bryce, Sil- 
ent Mystery, W. H. Chaplin comedies, Arbuckle 
1 reel re-issues; Mickey, Still Alarm, Raffles, 
( annibals of the South Sea Isles, Twelve Ten 
Husbands & Wives, Beloved Cheater, Rainey's 
Heart of the Jungle, Turn in the Road, Great 
Game, White Dove. Man Who Turned White. 

Famous Players Film Service Ltd., 87 Prince 
William St.. St. John (also, Toronto, Montreal, 
\\ innipeg, Calgary and Vancouver) : For Mari- 
time Provinces. — Canadian National Pictorial 
Outing Chester, Christie comedies, Globe Trots, 
Ditmar's Living Book of Nature and Cartoon 
comedy (split reel). Bruce Scenics and Educa- 
tional, Photoplay Screen Supplement, Christie 
specials, Chaplin Classics, Capitol comedies. Car- 
ter de Haven comedies, Canadian Government 
scenic. Upper Ways Under Conquest, Victory 
Leaders. Our Boys in Germany; Eyes of Youth, 
End of the Road, Hearts of the World, Birth of 
a Nation, Intolerance, Unpardonable Sin, Stolen 
Orders, Sahara Better 'Ole, Jack Canuck in Ber- 
lin, Virtuous Men, Comradeship, Life of Lord 
Nelson, The Westerners, Sagebrusher, Beware, 
Cavel Case. Mr. Wu, Superman, Witness for 
the Defense, Valley of Giants. Blue Blazes Raw- 
don, Smart Set, Rocks of Valpre, Ghosts of Yes- 
terday, DcLuxe Annie, Moth, By Right of Pur- 
chase. Scandal Up the Road with Sally, Amarilly 
of Clothesline Alley, Stella Maris, Rebecca of 



Sunnybrook Farm, Pride of the Clan, Sport.ng 
Life, Tom Sawyer, Huck and Tom; Also dis- 
tributors of Goldwyn program. 

The Amalgamated Exhibitors Circuit Ltd., 

Toronto. -Dr. lekyll ami Mr. Hyde, Bubbles, 
Suspicion. Girl from Nowhere, L:ttle Orphan 
Annie. Long Arm of Mannister, Atonement. Sins 
of the Children, 4 Olive Thomas spec.als. Hall- 
mark productions. The Screaming Shadow (serial), 
15 two reel Tom Mix western dramas, 13 one 
reel Facts and Follies 25 one reel Vod a-\ il I reels. 

Dominion Amu ement Co., Imperial Theater 
Bldg., Ottawa ;— First Nat onal tranchise tor 
Eastern Canada and a few state rights pictures 

Davis Amusement Enterprises— -Head orhce, 
Montreal Branch in Toronto. Distributing State 
Rights productions. Hank Man comedies. R. N. 
W M P two reel dramas, 5 Taylor Holmes pro_ 
duetions. "Carmen," etc. Handles distribution of 
Horsfall Productions and Amalgamated Exhib- 
itors Circuit for Ontario. 

Horsfall Productions, Ltd.— Distributing State 
Rights productions. 

Amalgamated Exhibitors' Circuit, Ltd. — D:stnb- 
tit.ng Hallmark and Pioneer releases in Canada. 

Adanac Producing Company, Ltd. -Releasing 
"The Great Shadow." 

Winnipeg Peerless Films, Ltd. — State Rights 
productions. 

Too Late To Classify 

KENTUCKY — 

Louisville — First National Exhibitors Exchange. 
National Theater Building : First National Pro- 
ductions and Clara Kimball Young in Soul of 
Raphael, Mid Channel. Ky.— Tenn. A-l's: Acci- 
dental Honeymoon. Alimony. Babbling Tongues, 
Beyond Law, Brown Harvard. Crisis. Choosing 
a Wife, Deemster. Daughter Destiny. Light With- 
in. Life Mask, Panther Woman, Tempered Steel, 
Empty Pockets. Fall Romanoffs. Fire Hope, Hu- 
man Shuttle, Shadow Fear, Web of Intrigue, 4 
Years in Germany, Fighting Roosevelts, Heart 
Texas Ryan. Hushed Hour, Kaiser's Finish, Mad 
Lover, Marvelous Masiste. Married Name Only, 
My Husband's Friend. One Law for Both. On 
Trial. Pass 3rd Floor, Price Innocence. Raffle'. 
Singn Invisible. Silver Threads, Sins of Ambition. 
Struggle Eeverlasting. Skinner's Dress Suit. To- 
Dav, Traitors Within Gates. Trooper 44. Two 
Men and a Woman When Desert Smiled, Womars 
Law. Whom Gods Destroy. Tex. Series: Circum- 
stantial Evidence, The Wall Street Mystery, fhe 
Unseen Witness, Trail of Cigarette, Cromley Case, 
Sacred Ruby. Blue Grass — Ky. only: Alster Case. 
Border Raiders. Dangerous Trails. FMgar's Court- 
ship, Garden of Allah, Joan the Woman, Little 
Shoes, Men of the Desert, Neptune's Doughtcr, 
Frivolous Wives, Open Places, Peggy, Range Boss, 
Shepherd Bargain Row, Land of Long Shadows, 
The Misleading Lady, The Man Trail. Unknown 
Ranger, Whither Tho Goest, Gift o'Gab. She Wolf. 
Eagles Series : Auction of Souls, Even as Eve, 
Chamber Mystery, The Still Alarm, Desert Scor- 
pion, Fool's Gold, Greater Sinner, Wolves of 
Street, Husbands and Wives, Stolen Orders, Spoil- 
ers, The Stranger, Silk Husbands and Calico 
Wives, Whip, Squareshooter, Sport Kings, Un- 
pardonable Sin. Record Breakers: Back t» 
God's Country, Confession Twin Beds, When 
Woman Loves, Mickey Tarzan Apes, Romance 
Tarzan. Shorts for Ky. and Tenn. : Emmett Dal- 
ton, Wallace Coburn Two- Reel Westerns. Tom 
Moore, Two-Reel Comedy Dramas. Unique com- 
edies, Billie Rhodes Comedies, Chester Outiig. 
Movie Magazine. Vod-Vil. Al St. John — Two- 
Reel comedies, Chaplin re-issues. Ky. Only : Texas 
Guinan — Two-Reel Westerns, Mack Swain com- 
edies, Jolly omedies. Serials : The Lost City and 
The Fatal Fortune." 
MICHIGAN— 

Detroit — E. N. Hennessey and E. W. Moross: 
Film Building : Neglected Wives with Anne Lu- 
ther, Claire Whitney and Charles Girard ; Norma 
Talmadge in Captivating Mary Carstairs, Billy 
Rhodes in His Pajama Girl and A Child for Sale, 
with Gladys Leslie, Creighton Hale, Bobby Con- 
nelly and Anna Lehr. Will handle one picture a 
month and three special productions during the 
coming year. 



165 



METRO-CLASSICS 




166 



Important Industrial Films 



This list has been compiled by the Educational 
Department of Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., Phil 
adelphia, as a service only. Where source of dis- 
tribution is not mentioned, it will be necessary to 
write direct to the company in whose films you 
may be interested, for terms, etc. 
Henry Disston & Sons. Inc., Phila., Pa. Making 
Crucible Steel, Circular, Band, Cross-Cut and 
Hand-Saws, Files and Rasps, 3,500 ft. Disston 
Films are available for free distribution, the only 
obligation being that the user pay return car- 
riage charges. Advance notice is requested for 
arrangement of schedule. 
Alpha Portland Cement Co., Easton, Pa. Port 

land Cement : Its Manufacture and Use. 
American Cyanamid Co.. 511 Fifth Ave., New 
York City. Fixation of Atmospheric Nitrogen. 
1,260 ft. 

American Gas Institute. 29 W. 39th St., New- 
York City. Be Careful. 

American Multigraph Sales Co., The, Cleveland, 
Ohio. You Think You Know Something You 
Don't, 2,000 ft.; How to Operate the Multi- 
graph, 2,000 ft. ; Hope of the Hills (a story of 
real life among Kentucky mountaineers), 6,000 
feet. 

-\merjcan Steel & Wire Co., New York City, N. 
Y. Through the Furnace to the Farm, 5 000 
ft ; Making of Harp, Piano and Pipe Organ, 
1,000 ft. 

American Type Founders Co., Jersev Citv. N. I 

The Power of the Press, 600 ft. 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., Manchester, N. H. The 

Manufacture of Cotton Cloth. 3,000 ft.; The 

Manufacture of Worsted Dress Goods, 1,500 ft.; 

Sidelights on the Mammoth Amoskeag Plant, 

1,000 ft. 

Atlas Educational Film Co , Chicago. 111. Coal 
Mining in Southern Illinois; Copper Mining; 
A Lesson of the Flames ; The Manufacture of 
Paper. 

Barber Asphalt Paving Co., Land Title Bldg., 
Phila., Pa. Trjnidad Asphalt (showing Trini- 
dad Asphalt Lake and the Bermudez Asphalt 
Lake in Venezuela) 3,000 ft 

Barrett Co.. The, 17 ' Battery Place, New York 
City, N. Y. Out of the Mud — Tarvia ; Build- 
ing the Roads of a Military Cantonment ; Food 
for Crops — Sulphate of Ammonia as a Ferti- 
lizer. 

Battle Creek Sanitarium. Battle Creek, Mich. 
Where the Battle rCeek Sanitarium Secures Its 
Milk, 1,000 ft.; The Battle Creek Sanitarium 
Schools, 1,000 ft.; Battle Creek, the Health 
Center of the World, 1,000 ft.; Tobacco Film 
(showjng the evil eeffcts of nicotine), 2,000 ft. 

Beech- Nut Packing Co., Canajoharie, N. Y. 
Preparation and Packing of Choice Food Prod- 
ucts, 1,000 ft. 

Belding Bros. & Co., 902 Broadway New Y°rk 
City. Silks, 1,000 ft. 

Bethlehem Steel Co., South Bethlehem, Pa. First 
Aid Exhibit. 

Bigelow-Hartford Co., New York City. Under 
the Feet of Men (carpet weaving), 500 ft. 

Borden's Condensed Milk Co., 108 Hudson St., 
New York City. Sanitary and Scientific Dai- 
ries, 2,000 ft.; Manufacture of Condensed Milk; 
Certified Milk ; Baby Welfare Reel and Square 
Deals for the Baby ; Manufacture of Evaporated 
Milk. 

Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., Boston, 
Mass. The Story of Rubber, 3,000 ft. 

Brill Co., J. G., Philadelphia, Pa. Safe and Un- 
safe Practices. 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co., 85 Clinton St., 
Brooklyn. The Price of Thoughtlessness. 

Brunswick Balke-Collender Co. The, Chicago, 111. 
Fine Cabinet Making; Billiards and Bowling; 
Harmony ill a Flat. 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co., Providence, R. I. 
Safe Practices. 

Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 
Washington, D. C. The Visual Instruction Sec- 
tion, Division of Educational Extension, con- 



ducts a service in visual instruction, makjng 
available through local agencies in each of the 
States — usually in the Extension Division of 
the State University — the pictures of the vari 
ous departments of the Government, of Na- 
tional organizations interested in education, and 
of concerns interested in the promotion of the 
industrial and commercial welfare of the country. 

( alifornia Industrial Accident Commission, with 
co-operation of California White and Sugar Pjne 
Association and California Redwood Associa- 
tion, 525 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Pre- 
ventable Accidents in the Lumber Industry. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Co., Montreal, Canada. 
New Brunswick and Nova Scotia (scenes around 
Bay of Fundy) ; Evangeline Land; Fishjng 
Near Fredericton, N B. ; Lumbering Near 
Fredericton, N. B. ; Winter Sports in Quebec, 
No. 1 (Tobogganing and Curling) ; Winter 
Sports in Quebec No. 2 (Ski-ing and Sleigh- 
ing) ; Winter Sports in Quebec No. 3 (Snow- 
shoeing, Dog Teams etc.) ; Asbestos (Quebec) ; 
Fighting the Car Shortage (Bujlding a Freight 
Car); Building a Locomotive; Across the Gerat 
Lakes; Nipigon River, Up the (Fishing); Fort 
William; Lake of the Woods; Medicine Hat; 
In the Beef and Butter Country (Farming 
Scenes in Southern Alberta) ; Harvesting Al- 
berta's Crop; Irrigation in Alberta; Banff; 
Through the Canadian Pacific Rockies (Scenes 
around Banff); Lake Louise; The Top of the 
World (Lakes in the Clouds and Moraine 
Lake); Trails and Climbs (Alpine Club at Lake 
Louise); Lakes, Waterfalls and Glaciers (Em- 
erald Lake and Upp er Yoho Valley) ; Camp- 
ing Out in the Canadian Rockies (Yoho Valley 
and Emerald Lake) ; Ice Fields and Ice Moun- 
tains (Scenes near Glacier) ; Nakimu Caves 
Glacier, B. C.) ; Over the Canadian Pacific 
Rock'es (Vancouver and District) ; Victoria, B. 
C. ; Alas'-a via the Inside Passage (Vancouver 
to Wrangell) ; Hobnobbing with Glaciers (Taku 
Glacier and vicinity) : Railway Near the North 
Pole (Skagway and District); Road to the 
Land of Midnight Sun (Skagway to White 
Horse); Atlin. Alaska; Northern Gold (Mining 
near Dawson) ; Thrills Aplenty for Alpine 
Climbers; Canadian Rockies Ocer Virgin Fields; 
Salmon Fishing in New Brunswick ; Trout 
Fishing in Quebec ; From Scales to Antlers ; 
Climbing at Mt. Assiniboine. 

Carnation Mjlk Products Co., Seattle, Wash. 
(Motion Picture Dept., Box 822, Chicago, III.) 
Manufacture of Evaporated Milk ; Dairy Film, 
Carnation Stock Farms, Seattle and Oconomo- 
woc, Wis. ; Judging of Carnation King Sylvia, 
the $106,000" Bull Calf (Dairy Film). 

Certain-teed Products Corp., Boatmen's Bank 
Bldg , St. Louis. Mo. The Romance of Rags; 
How Certain-teed Roofing is Made. 

Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R. Chicago, 
III. Electrification of Line Through Rocky 
Mountains, 2,000 ft.; Mt. Rainier. National 
Park, Washington, 2.000 ft. 

Chicago Rwy. Co., Chicago, 111. Fjlm of Street 
and Street Car Hazards. 

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Rwy., Chicago. 
111. Hazards of Trainmen Working In and 
About Cars. 

Cinematograph Co., The, 220 W. 42nd St., New 
York City. Milk Industry (films being pre- 
pared) 

Commercial Economics, Bureau of Dept. of Pub- 
lic Instruction, Washington, D. C. Any organ- 
ization which desires to use the films of the 
Bureau, through the medjum of the co-operat- 
ing universities, may have the privilege under 
the following stipulations: Payment of trans- 
portation charges from and to the distributing 
center. The films shall be used on standard 
motion picture projectors handled by compe- 
tent operators. A report of films used and at- 
tendance shall be mailed after each performance 
to the distributing center. Films shall be re- 
turned immediately after use. No fee whatso- 



167 



Berwilla Film Corporation 

Announces the Following Production 
for the Season 1920-21 



Ben JVilson and Neva Gerber 
In a 15-Chapter Serial Entitled 
"The Crimson Lash" 

Released by Selznick 

Jack Hoxie 
In a 15-Episode serial 

'Thunderbolt Jack" 

Released by Arrow 

Ben JVilson and Neva Gerber 
In a Super Feature Entitled 

"Let Him Without Sin" 

BEN WILSON, President 



BERWILLA FILM CORPORATION 

Can lease studio space with full equipment of accessories 
for independent companies. For full particulars address: 

WM. LA PLANTE, General Manager 
3821 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood, Cat. 



168 



ever is charged or accepted for the use of the 
films of the Bureau. No admission fees to the 
public are permitted to be charged, nor are 
collections, during or after the exhibition, per- 
missible. Application for the service must be 
made on the application blank, which is availa- 
ble upon request. Complete list' of educational 
subjects and full particulars may be had by ap- 
plying to Mr. Francis Holley, Director. 

Community Motion Picture Bureau. 46 W. 24th 
St., New York City. Supplies educational and 
recreational Motion Picture Service for Com- 
munity development. This Bureau has fur- 
nished selected motion picture programs of over 
JO million feet of films weekly to the American 
soldiers in camps in this country and overseas ; 
to the U. S. Navy ; to the transport service and 
to the Allyied Armies It maintains a staff in 
each of the mjlitary divisions of the U. S. ; 
also in France, United Kingdom, Italy, The 
Balkans, occupied portions of Germany, and» 
many other countries, including Russia. Large 
staff of experienced editorial reviewers and edu 
cational experts. Highly specialized index of 
records covering milljons of feet of selected 
films. Provides programs for schools, churches 
and any other community group or purpose, 
particularly industrial and .Americanization work. 
W rite your needs ; we will give our best. 

Corticelli Silk Mills. Florence. Mass. From Co- 
coon to Spool, 2,000 ft.; same 1,000 ft. 

Curtis Publishing Co., Philadelphia, Pa. Pro- 
ducing the Ladies' Home Journal and Satur- 
day Evening Post. 6.000 ft. : Thomas Tefferson 
-Morgan, P-J-G (the story of a boy), sent free 
upon request. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western R. R. Co., 90 
West St., New York City. Coal Miners' Safety 
First Methods 

Dennison Mfg. Co., The, Framingham, Mass. 
Framing Baby's Picture (use of new picture 
binding) . 

Denver & Rio Grande R. R„ Equitable BIdg.. 
Denver, Colo. The Royal Gorge, Grand Can- 
yon of the Arkansas Colo. ; Mesa Verde Na- 
tional Park, the Land of the Cliff Dwellers 
(Southwestern Colorado). 

Detroit Stove Works. 1320 : 80 Jegerson Ave., 
Detroit, Mich. Making Jewel Stoves, 1,000 ft. 
iamond Match Co., The. Ill Broadway, New 
York City. Striking a Light. Apply Bureau 
of Commercial Economics, Washington, D. C. 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc , Phila., Pa. Making 
Crucible Steel. Circular. Band. Cross-Cut and 
Hand-Saws, Files and Rasps, 3 500 ft. 

Dodge Bros , Detroit, Mich. Apply Bureau of 
Commercial Economjcs, Washington. D. C. 
Motor Cars. 

Dodge Mfg. Co.. Silver Lake, Ind. Field Day 
Exercses and Recreation. 

Doubleday, Page & Co.. Garden City. L. I., X. 
Y. Book and Magazine Maging, 3.000 ft. 

Dow Wire & IronWorks, Louisville, Ky. School- 
House Fire and Gravity Conveyor Escape, 
1.000 ft. 

duPont de Nemours & Co.. E I. Wilmington. 
Uel. Farming with Dynamite. 1.000 ft.; Road 
Building Film, 1.000 ft. 

Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, N. Y. Carless- 
ness and Caution, 1.000 ft.; Some of the Safety 
Devices in Use in the Factories of the Eastman 
Kodak Co., 1.000 ft. 

Educational Film Corn, of America. 171 Madison 
Ave.. New York City. Mine Rescue Work ; 
In the Grip of Alcohol; Logging in Maine. 

Elgin Watch Co.. Elgin, 111. Making a Fjne 
Watch. 1 000 ft. 

Ellsworth Collieries, Ellsworth. Pa. Welfare Ac- 
tivities. 

Endicott Johnson Co, Endicott, N. Y. The Shoe 
Industry. 

Firestone Tire & Rubber Co.. Akron, Ohio. For 
the Common Good (2 reels) ; Careless America 
(1 reel); Flying Over Akron, 800 ft.; The Rea 
son for Firestone Supremacy ; Giants of the 
Koads and Giants of the Forest ; The Birth of 
a Tire (1 reel); Manufacturing the Giant Cord 
Tire — The Colossus of Roads; The Manufactur 
ing of Firestone Giant Solid Tires ; The Manu- 
facturing of Tire Accessories; The Manufac- 
turing of Inner Tubes; Trucking Through Dix 



ieland, 6,000 ft.; Better Truck Tire Service (1 
reel) ; The Winning Wheels of War (2 reels) ; 
The Link — A Salesman Picture (3 reels) ; Mod- 
ern Tire Repair Methods (4 reels). 
Ford Motor Co., Detroit, Mich. Films obtained 
from the Goldwyn Dis. Corp. 131, What Uncle 
Sam Will Do for 2 Cents; 132, The Truth 
About the Liberty Motor; 133, Hang It All — 
Wall Paper; 134, Old New England — Boston; 

135, Carrying Old Glory to the Seven Seas; 

136, Mt. Edith Cavel; 137, Where the Spirit 
That Won Was Born; 138, Rough Stug— Car- 
borundum ; 139, Good to Eat; 140, The Story 
of Steel; 141, A Little Bit of Heaven — Yosem- 
ite Valley; 142, What Uncle Sam Had Up His 
Sleeve; 143 Cut It Out — Story of the Making 
of Cut Glass; 144, Notrhern Sports Under 
Southern Skies; 145, Good Roads; 146, The 
Four Runners of Joy — Showing How Wheels 
Are Made for Automobiles; 147, Mt. Hood; 
148, Can the Poor Fish— A Story of the Sal- 
mon Industry ; 149, A Wild Goose Chase — 
Hunting Wild Geese With a Camera; 150, From 
Mud to Mug — The Story of Pottery Making; 
The Assembling of an Auto; The Making of an 
Automobile Piston; Safeguarding; 151, Mak- 
ing Ukeleles; 152, When Black if (Read); 153, 
The Only Way; 154. Pure Havana; 155, At the 
Cross Roads; 156, The Fable of the Olive and 
the Orange; 157, School Days; 158, The Town 
of Up and Down; 159, Sweetness; 160. A Gen- 
uine Panama; 161, God's Handiwork; 162, 
Caught — Landing Some Big Ones in Canadian 
Northwest; 163 Days of Real Sport; 154, Home 
.Made; 165, The Anglers; 166, Going South: 
167, Animal Antics; 168, Snapping Snappers; 
169, Town Tropics; 170. Panama Canal; 171, 
By the Sea; 172. Little Bo Peep; 173. Rock of 
Ages; 174, Net Profits; 175, Nature's Echo; 
176. Paper Making; 177. Hooping Up; 178, 
Islands of St. Lawrence; Seeing a Few Thou- 
sand Islands; 179. Cutting Up; The Meat [n 
dustry ; 180, The Story of Zinc; Mined ind 
Moulded; 181. "Meat" Again; By-Products of 
Meat; 182. Eventide; 183, Bubbles; 184. Just 
Kinds; 185. Taken with a Grain of Salt; 186. 
The Flowing Road; 187, "De-Light"; Making 
an Electric Light Bulb; 188, In Higher Spheres; 
189, Silverware; 190. Tick Tock ; 191. Broken 
Silence ; A Visit to a Day School for Deal Chil- 
dren ; 192, With Every Meal; Dealing with 
Knives, Forks and Spoons; 193. The Alligator 
Hunt; 194. "A Pilgrimage"; 195. Cut and 
Dried; 196, From East to West; Rug Making; 
197, North Wind's Masonry: Winter Scenes of 
-Niagara Falls; 198, Cherry Blossom Time; A 
Japanese Festival and Rice Growing; 199 The 
Reawakening ; Occupational Training at Fort 
Sheridan; 200, See-Saw ; The Manufacture of 
Saws; 201, Made Game; Sporting Goods; 202, 
Home of the Seminole ; 203. Plavthing of 
Childhood; 204, "To 'Suit' Man"; How men's 
clothes are made; 205, Chu Chu: Illustrat : ng 
the making of gum; 206, Wickerware : Illus- 
trating the making of wicker and reed furnit- 
ture; 207, Little Comrades: General school 
picture; 208. Tropical Gems of Florida : Scenic; 
209, Water as Power; 210, Just Write: Making 
Fountain Pens: 211 Current Occurrences: Mak 
ing Electric Flat Irons and Percolators; 212, 
Into the Big Cypress: Scenic: 213, Starting 
Life : Showing Younfr Life. 

General FClectric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. Pan- 
ama Canal (2 reels) ; Schenectady Works (1 
reel); Pittsfield Works. (1 reel); Back to the 
Farm (2 reels) ; King of the Rails (3 reels) ; 
Benefactor Thomas A. Edison (3 reels) : Fairy 
Magic (2 reels); The Electrical Giant (1 reel): 
Potters' Wheel ( 1 reel) ; Cuba, the Island of 
Sugar (2 reels) ; The Queen of the Waves (2 
reels). 

Ginn &C6., 15 Ashburton Place, Boston Mass 

The Making of Books. 
Globe Stove & Range Co., Kokotuo, Ind. Mak 

ing Stoves and Ranges. 1,000 ft. 
Goodrich Rubber Co., The B. F.. Akron. Ohio. 

Rubber in the World War, 2.000 ft. 
Grand Rapids Showcase Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Lost Motion jn Selling. 3.000 ft 
Harrison Bros. & Co., Philadelphia. Pa. Hazards 

of the Lead Industry. 



16') 



J AC DILLON, Director 

"SUDS" with Mary Pickford 
"THE RIGHT OF WAY" with Bert Lytell 

Now Making Special Productions for Famous- 
PIa\rrs-Lasky 



170 



Hecker-Jones-Jewell Milling Co., 40 Corlears St., 
New York City How the Miller Has Changed 
to Meet Modern Conditions 3,200 ft. 

Heinz Co., H. J., Pittsburgh,' Pa. No. 1, Heinz 
57 Varieties, 900 ft. ; No. 2, Heinz Tomatoes 
and Preserves, 840 ft. ; No. 3, Hejnz Baked 
Beans, 600 ft. ; No. 4, Heinz Pickles, 600 ft. ; 
Heinz Vinegar, 1,100 ft.; Heinz Spaghetti and 
Pickles, 1,100 ft. 

Hendee Mfg. Co., Springfield, Mass Making In- 
dian Motorcycles 3,000 ft. 

Hercules Powder Co., Wilmington, Del. Modern 
Uses of Dynamite ; Kelp Film ; Farm Dynamite 
Film ; Industrial Film. 

Hershey Chocolate Co., Hershey, Pa. Cocoa and 
Chocolate, from Bean to Cup, 3,500 ft. 

Holt Mfg. Co., The, Peoria, Hi. Caterpillar 
Tractors jn Military Service. 6,300 ft. : Cater- 
pillar Tractors in Road Building, 900 ft. ; Cat- 
erpillar Tractors in Logging Service, 900 ft. ; 
Caterpillar Tractors in Agricultural Service, 
900 ft. 

Industrial Moving Picture Co., Chicago, 111. Wood 
Pulp and Paper Industry. 

International Harvester Co , Chicago, 111. Trac- 
tor Farming, 1 000 ft. ; New Ways for Old, 

1,000 ft.; America's Golden Harvest, 1,000 It.; 
A Hunch of Sheep on Every Farm, 1,000 ft.; 
Canning— Cold Pack Method, 1,000 ft.; Corn- 
Harvesting and Testing the Seed, 1,000 ft. ; 
Corn — Growing and Feeding, 1,000 ft.; Dairv 
Cows— Milk, Nature's Perfect Food, 1,000 ft.; 
Grow a Garden — Important Factor of Recon- 
struction, 1,000 ft.; Household Economics — 
Making Mother's Work Easier, 1.000 ft.; The 
Horse — Care, Use, Harnessing. Hitching, 1.000 ft. 

Keith Co., Geo. E., Camptllo, Mass. Making 
Walkover Shoes. 900 ft. 

Koppers Co., The, Pittsburgh, Pa. Operation of 
By-Products Coke Plants. 1,800 ft. 

Koven & Brother, L O., 154 Ogden Ave., Jersey 
City, N. J. An Up-to-Date Boiler Works and 
Sheet Metal Plant. 1,000 ft. 

Krohn-Fechheimer Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. A 
Footwear Romance, 1,000 ft. 

Lamb- Fish Lumber Company Charleston, Miss. 
Lumber Industry, 4,000 ft. ; Plan of Operation. 

Larkin & Company, Buffalo. X. Y. Their First 
Problem (a solution of the high cost of living 
problem). 2,000 ft. 

Lehigh Portland Cement Company, Young Bldg., 
Allentown, Pa. Concrete Romance, 3,000 ft. 

Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., The, 185 Devon- 
shire St., Boston, Mass. The Outlaw. 

Long Bell Lumber Co., The. Kansas City, Mo. 
Lumber industry films being prepared. 

Louisville Soap Company, Louisvjlle, Ky. The 

Clean Easy Way 900 ft. 

Lowe Bros. Company, Dayton, Ohio. Paints, 
Varnishes, Colors. 

McElroy-Sloan Shoe Company, St. Louis, Mo. 
Shoes (How Made), 2.000 ft. 

Macey Company, The, Grand Rapids, Mich. From 
the Forest to the Home, 1.000 ft. 

Marshall-Field & Company. Chicago, 111. Pick- 
ing, Ginning and Spinning of Cotton, 2,000 ft. ; 
Making of Lakeside Cotton Blankets, 1,000 ft.; 
Miking Marshall Fjeld & Company Valmore 
and Utopia Ginghams 1,000 ft.; Zion Lace In- 
dustries — The Manufacture of Zion Laces and 
Curtains, 2,000 ft. 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, New York 
City. Human Side of Industry. 1,000 ft.; Hu- 
manity in Insurance, 1,000 ft 

Modern Woodman of America. 93 Nassau St., 
New York City. The Man Who Came Back 
( Tuberculosis) . 

Mulford Company, H. K.. Philadelphia, Pa. Four 
reels totaling 3,500 ft. showing productjon of 
Smallpox Vaccine, Diphtheria Antitoxin, Ty- 
phoid Vaccine, and other biological products. 

National Assn. of Mfrs., 30 Church St., New York 
City. Crime of Carelessness, 1,000 ft.; The 
Workman's Lesson 1,000 ft.; An American in 
the Making; The Man He Might Have Been. 

National Cash Register Company, Dayton, Ohjo. 
Beautifying a Community, 1,000 ft.; Boy Prob 
lem Solved, 1,000 ft.; Evolution of Cash Regis 
ter, 2,000 ft.; Factory Welfare, 1,000 ft.; Mak 
ing Cash Rgeisters, 1,000 ft.; Making Sales 
Hooks, 1,000 ft.; Safety Devices. 1,000 ft. 



National Electric Light Association. 29 W. 39th 
St. New York City. The Lineman. 

National Lead Company, 111 Broadway, New 
York Cjty. The Making of White Lead, 3,000 
ft.; Hazards in the Lead Industry. 

National Motion Picture Company, Indianapolis. 
Ind. Dangers of the Street; Staking Then- 
Lives ; The Fire Demon. 

National Tube Company. Pittsburgh. Pa. From 
Ore to Finished National Pipe, 3,000 ft.; Wel- 
fare Work Among the Employes of the Com- 
pany, 1,000 ft.; The Manufacture of Shelby 
Seamless Steel Tubing, 1,000 ft.; The Manu- 
facture of Shelby Seamless Cylinders, 1,000 ft. 

New Jersey Zinc Company, The, 160 Front St., 
New York City. Manufacturing Zinc ' Oxide 
Used in Pains, Rubber Tires and various other 
Commodities. 

New York Bureau of Public Health Dept. of 
Health Education, 136 Centre St., New York 
City. Films engaged must be called for and 
returned the next day. Summer Babies ; The 
Visiting Nurse; The Man Who Learned (Milk 
Picture) ; Children Who Labor ; A Man in the 
f'a' ing; Sisters All (solving a Social Prob- 
lem); The Error of Omission; At the Theshold 
of Life (Kindergarten) ; The Wedding Bell 
( Goods made in Sweatshops, Typhoid Fever) ; 
The Awakening of John Bond (Study and pre- 
vention of Tuberculosis) ; On the Trail of the 
('.runs (Tuberculosis); A Visit to a Public 
Nursery; From the Field to the Cradle (Milk 
Picture); A Curable Disease; The Red Cross 
(Tuberculosis activity) ; The Rat Menace; Poi- 
son (Pure Food, canned goods film) ; A Sol- 
dier of Peace (Diphtheria Prevention) ; The 
Temple of Moloch (a Tuberculosis Film). 

New York Central Lines, Grand Central Ter- 
minal, New York City. The Right and Wrong 
Practices on Railroads; Steve Hill's Awaken- 
ing; The House That Jack Built; The Rule of 
Reason. 

New York Department of Health, New York City. 
The Trump Card; In His Father's Footsteps; 
Bringing It Home; Samaritans Three. 

New York Fjre Dept. (Mr. Northrop), Municipal 
Bldg., New York City. The Locked Door. 

New York Telephone Company, 15 Dey St., New 
York City. The Spinners of Speech; The Tel- 
ephone Girl. 

Pacific Elec Rwy. Co., Los Angeles, Cal. Safe 
and Unsafe Practices on Interurban Railways 
(Electric). . 

Packard Motor Car Company, Detroit, Mich. 
Wheel Building, 2,000 ft. ; Truck Motor Assem- 
bly and Building, 1,000 ft.; Twin-Six Assembly, 
1 000 ft. 

Page & Shaw, Inc., 18-20 Ames St., Cambridge A., 
Boston, Mass. Candy. 

Peabody Coal Company, 332 S. Michigan Ave., 
Chicago, 111. Coal Mjning in Southern Illi- 
nois (new films being prepared). 

Pennsylvania R. R. System, Broad Street Station, 
Philadelphia. The Americanization of Tony. 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum, Philadelphia. 
Sets of Lantern Slides with Typewritten Lec- 
tures on such subjects as Argentina, China, 
> Congo, Jamaica, Iron Cotton, Lumber, etc. 
Moving picture films illustrating Industries, 
Commerce and Geography, also Educational 
Collections. 

Pittsburgh Street Rwy. Co., Pittsburgh. Causes 
of Accidents on Street and in and Among Street 

Cars. 

Plant Company, Thomas G., Boston, Mass. Mak- 
ing Women's Shoes, 1,000 ft. 

Postum Cereal Company, Battle Creek, Mich. 
Making of Pure Foods in Battle Creek, 1,000 ft. 

Public Service Railway Company, Newark, N. J. 
Making a Convert; On the Wrong Track; The 
Life of a Motorman ; The High Cost of Hurry. 

Pyrene Mfg. Company, 52 Vanderbilt Ave., New 
York City. Pyrene vs. Peril. 

Raritan Copper Works, Perth Amboy, N. J. First 
Aid to the Injured. 

Reed & Barton. Taunton, Mass. (Silversmiths, 
Goldsmiths, Bronze Founders.) Apply Bureau 
of Commercial Economics, Washington, D. C. 

Remington Typewriter Company, 374 Broadway, 
New York City. Evolution of a Typewriter. 
Evolution of a Stenographer. 



171 



Robbing & Myers Company. Springfield, Ohio. 

.Making an Electric Motor. _ 
Rogers- 1! rown Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, From 

Mine to Moulder, 3.600 ft. 
Royal Tailors, The, Chicago. 111. New York City. 

Welfare Work in the World's Greatest Tailor 

Shops, 500 ft. 
Russell Jennings Mfg. Company, Chester, Conn. 

Auger Bits. 

Schlichter Jute Cordage Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa. Jute, Its Cultivation and Manufacture Into 
Cordage, 4,000 ft. ; Philadelphia, Historical, 
Commercial and Social, 2,500 ft. 

Shredded Wheat Company, The, Niagara Falls, 
N. Y. It's All in the Shreds, 1,000 ft. 

Skinner & Sons Wm.. 47 East 17th St., New 
York City. Silks and Satins (Life History of 
Silk Worm), 1,000 ft. 

Sperry Flour Company, 332 Pine St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. From Wheat to Sperry Flour, 1,000 
ft.; Bread-Making in Different Parts of the 
World. 1,000 ft. 

Standard Sanitary Mfg. Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
The Tale of the Tub, 5,000 ft. 

Starrett Company, L. S., Athol, Mass. Making 
Machinists' Tools. 3,500 ft. 

Staude Mak-A Tractor Co., E. G., 2675 West Uni- 
versity Ave. St. Paul, Minn. Using a Ford for 
Heavy Pulling, 1,500 ft. 

Stetson Company, John B., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Making Felt Hats, 1,000 ft. 

Strathmore Paper Company, Mittineague, Mass. 
Making Strathmore Quality Papers, 1,000 ft. 

Supplee-Wills-Jones Milk Company, 26th and Jef- 
ferson Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Todd Protectograph Company, Rochester, N. Y. 
A Modern Black Art, 4,000 ft.; A Trip Thru 
the Protectograph Plant, 1,000 ft. 

Training Camp Activities Commission on, 105 
West 40th St., New York City. Fit to Fight. 

Underwriters' Laboratories, 207 £. Ohio St., Chi- 
cago, 111. Fire and Safety Appliance Testing at 
Underwriters' Laboratories. 

United States Brewers' Association, 50 Union Sq., 
New York City. The Story of a Glass of Beer, 
1,000 ft. 

United States Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Safety Methods in Coal and Metal Mining; 
First Aid to the Injured; Welfare Work in Min- 
ing and Allied Industry ; The Man Who Learn- 
ed (Milk); The Fly Pest; Hope; The Mos- 
quito ; The Unbeliever Convinced. 

LTnited States Gypsum Company, 205 W. Monroe 
St., Chicago. 111. The Gypsum Industry in 
America, 1,000 ft. 

Unitrd States Railroad Administration, Western 
Passenger Traffic Committee, Chicago, 111. Ap- 
ply to Howard H. Hayes, Mgr., Bureau of 
Service, National Parks and Monuments, 646 
Transportation Bldg., Chicago, III. Lantern 
Slides and Motion Picture Films, National Park 
subject. The Bureau of Service is prepared to 
furnish for entertainment and educational pur- 
poses, sets of colored lantern slides and reels 
of motion picture films featuring the most prom- 
inent national parks. These slides and films are 
sent to responsible persons without cost, ex- 
cepting the express charges in both directions. 
Applicants are requested to name two subjects ; 
first choice and second choice. The slide sets 
with accompanying lecture notes include the 
following subjects : Glacier National Park ; 
Grand Canyon National Park ; Mesa Verde Na- 
tional Park ; Mount Ranier National Park ; 
Rocky Mountain National Park ; Yellowstone 
National Park ; Yosemite National Park, with 
views of General Grant and Sequoia National 
Parks. In the motion picture films are shown ; 
Crater .Lake National Park ; Glacier National 
Park; Grand Canyon National Park; Mesa 
Verde National Park ; Mount Rainier National 
Park; Rocky Mountain National Park; Yellow- 
stone National Park ; Y ose mite National Park. 
There have been, sent to this bureau several reels 
of films featuring Alaska. Columbia River Scenic 
Highway, Dawn of the Electrical Era in Rail 
ro.iding. Central Wyoming, Idaho, Portland 
Rose Festival, Royal Gorge, and California 
Scenes, which are available for exhibition pur- 
poses. 

United States Shoe Mch. Company (Publicity 
Dept.), Boston. Mass. The Making of a Shoe 
(from Cowhide Pelt to Goodyear Writ). 1,000 



tt ; Jim's Vocation, 1.UU0 it.; The Industrial 
City, 1,000 ft. 

United States Steel Corporation, 71 Broadway. 
New York City. An American in the Making; 
The Workman's Lesson; The Reason Why; 
Why ; Welfare Work of H. C. Frick ( oal Ik 
Coke Co.; Mine to Moulder (Iron); From 
Ore to Finished Pipe. 

Universal Film Mfg. Company. 1600 Broadway. 
New York City; Careless America. 

University of Wisconsin, Bureau of V lsual In- 
struction, Madison, Wis. Circuit Service in 
Educational Slides and Motion Picture Films. 
No rental fee is charged, only expense being 
transportation charges on films. Application 
blanks, classified list of films and regulations 
governing the service upon request. 

Ward Baking Company, New York City. 1 he 
Story of a Loaf of Bread, 4,000 ft. 

Washburn Lignite Coal Company, Wilton, N. D. 
Lignite Coal Mines, Beautiful Farms, 1.000 ft. 

Waterman & Company, L. E., 191 Broadway, New 
York City. Ideal Fountain Pens, 1,000 ft.; 
The Evolution of the Pen, 1.000 ft.; Pen Points 
of Progress, 1,000 ft. 

Welch Grape Tuice Company. Westfield, N. Y. 
The Grape Juice Industry, 1.200 ft. 

Western Electric Company, 195 Broadway, New 
York City. A Square Deal for His Wife, 2 
reels ; The Education of Mrs. Drudge, 1 reel ; 
Telephone Inventors of Today, 3 reels; Forging 
the Links of Fellowship, 2 reels; Inside the Big 
Fence, 2 reels. 

Willys-Overland, Inc., Toledo. Ohio. How Au- 
tomobiles Are Made, 2.000 ft. 

Wilson & Company, Inc., Chicago, 111. Packing 
House Industry, 10,000 ft. 

Winchester Repeating Arms Company. New 
Haven, Conn. The Winning Shot, 3,000 ft.; 
F'aney Shooting with Pistol. Rifle and Shotgun, 
1,000 ft. 

Woolman, Edw. W., 4709 Lancaster Ave., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Producing, Pasteurizing, Scien- 
tifically Testing and Delivering Milk, 1.200 ft. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Bosworth, DeFrenes & Fel- 
ton; The Striking Tires, A Trip Thru a Rub- 
ber Plant, Reblazing the 49 Trail (an adven- 
ture picture), The Making of Powers' Camer- 
graph. 

Worcester Film Corp., Worcester Mass. and 14? 
West 45 St. New York City. : A Visit to 
Whitin Machine Works (the home of Textile 
machinery of Quality), The Making of an 
American, Speeding Up (Uncle Sam's Revolu- 
tionary plan to Accelerate transportation). The 
Priceless Gift of Health. Standardized Belting 
(the manufacture of leather belts used for power 
transmission), Through Life's Window (The 
Tale of a ray of light). From Bale to cloth 
(The wonderful story of cotton manufacture). 
Opportunity (a story for your boy). 

Productions made by Motion Picture Bureau 
Western Electric Company, Charles W. Bar- 
rel. Director. "The Go-Getter" — a story of 
new ideas and old prejudices — 3,400 feet; 
"Making Telephones in Tokyo" — a combined 
travelogue and industrial — 925 feet. "Keeping 
Fit" — Sunlight studies of a big family of 
workers at play, 890 feet. "The Land of the 
White Cedar" — Making p oelsin nature's snowy 
workshop, 975 feet. The Western Cedar In- 
dustry — two separate reels. The Mt. Rainer 
Fur Industry — two separate reels. 

Produced and distributed by Industrial & Edu- 
cational Department of Universal Film Manu- 
facturing Co., "Skookum Apples." 3 reels. 
How an advertising appropriation was ex- 
pended in putting Skookum apples on the. New 
York market. "The Yanks are Coming." 8 
reels. How Dayton- Wright aeroplanes arc 
made. "The Girl Behind the Hoe." 1 reel. 
Work of Woman's Land Army of New Jersey. 
"Is America Worth Saving?" 2 reels. A vis- 
ualization of Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler's lec- 
ture on that subject. "The Open Road to a 
Greater America." 1 reel. Showing the need 
of good roads and the advantage of motor 
truck transportation. "The Making of Chevrolet 
Motor Cars." 4 reels. "The Making of 
Haynes Motor Cars." 4 reels. "The Making 
of Dort Cars." 1 reel. "You Auto Know 



173 




Two Reelers 
"Torchy" Comedies 
Celebrated A uihor Comedies 
Single Reelers 
"You Know Me" Series 
Lester Allen Comedies 
"Newlywed" Series 



Why be Offensive to 
Women? 

To please men ? Nothing could be a 
greater mistake. Women are 65% of 
your audiences; and men enjoy clean fun 
as well as women do. 

A star, a story, or both, to be featured 
in each picture — -that you can afford to 
put out in lights. 

MASTER SHORT SUBJECTS 
have drawing power 

Two reel and single reel comedies of a 
standard that will delight everybody, from 
the sophistic, blase, metropolitan theatre- 
goer to the village maiden. Because their 
appeal is to the universal love of laughter 
that all humanity shares in common. 

. As an example — the "Torchy" pictures 
with Johnny Hines, from Sewell Ford's 
stories are being distributed by The Edu- 
cational Film Exchanges, Inc. 

For complete information, write to 

MASTER FILMS, INC. 

C. C. Burr, Pres. 

130 W. 44th St., N. Y. 



174 



Better." 2 reels. A comedy concerning used 
automobiles. "America's Heritage. 2 reels. A 
cross country tour of the Boy Scouts of 
America. "May Irwin's Loaf." 1 reel. Mak- 
ing of yeast war bread and featuring May Ir- 
win. A Brush Comedy. 1 reel. A comedy 
based on the selling of Fuller brushes. "Foun- 
tain of Youth." 1 reel. The use of shaving 
brushes. "Candy Courtship." 5 reels. A fea- 
ture story of romance and good candy. "Low- 
ney's Candy Factory," 3 reels. The manu- 
facture of candy in a modern plant, "Cable 
& Wire." 5 reels. The manufacture of electric 
cable and cord. "Hearts & Jerseys." 5 reels. 
A Jersey cattle comedy drama featuring May 
Irwin. "The Car that Came Back." 2 reels. 
The use of chemical automobile accessories. 
"A Day at Nowesco." 1 reel. Plant of the 
Northwestern Chemical Co. "The Oval Wood 
Dish Company." 2 reels. Logging of Beech, 
Birch and Maple in the Adirondacks, all op- 
erations of the saw mill, and the making of 
clothespins and wood dishes in an eificient 
operation. "Gift of Heaven." 1 reel. The 
manufacture of coffee and its use, from the 
coffee-house of olden times to our modern hotels. 
"The Romance of Gloversville." 2 reels. The 
city of Gloversville and the making of gloves. 
"East Meets West." 2 reels. A story featuring 
the City of Omaha, Nebr. "Golden Legend. ' 
5 reels. A romance of old and new Orleans, 
La. "The Making of Corsets." 1 reel. "From 
Cacti to Cotton." 2 reels. The reclamation 
of an Arizona desert and the growth of cotton. 
"From Fibre to Fabric." 5 reels. The man- 
ufacture of tire fabric. "King of Cotton." 9 
reels. The complete story of the reclamation 
of an Arizona desert and the establishment in 
its place of a long-staple cotton plantation. 
Habits and customs of native Mexican lab- 
orers. "The Evolution of a Cough Drop." 1 
reel. Manufacture of cough drops. "Willow 
Brook Dairy Co." 2 reels. The bottling and 
delivery of milk, by modern methods. "Heads 
Win." 5 reels. The story of the failure of a 
factory worker and his family who attains suc- 
cess in his work thru systematic and directed 
study. "Rolling Steel by Electricity." 2 reels. 
The Largest I'ngine in the Wn-ld." ! 'ee-. 
New York Interborough Turbine. "Electric 
Household Convenience." 2 reels. A series 
of short subjects entitled as follows : "The 
House that Runs by Magic." "Santa and the 
Wonderful Genii." "Table Cookery." "Cur- 
rent Convenience." (Electric outlets conven- 
iently placed). "Heat Chaser." (Electric 
Fans.) "Which One of These is You." (Elec 
trie Irons.) "Who Washes Your Clothes?" 
"Cable and Wire." 5 reels. The manufacture 
of electric cable and cord. "That Well Dressed 
Look." Spring and Summer Fashions, 1919 
shown by cartoons and models. "That Well 
Dressed Look." Fall and Winter fashions, 1919, 
shown in a pretty little dream story. "Fifty 
Golden Years." 1 reel. Fashions in every 
decade from 1870 to the present day. "Arming 
our Fighting Men." 1 reel. The manufacture 
of side rams, machine guns and rifles. "The 
Menace." 2 reels. Fire prevention by auto- 
matic sprinklers. "The Romance of Glovers- 
ville." 2 reels. The manufacture of gloves of 
avrious makes. "Admishun Ten Pins." 3 
reels. The manufacture of hooks and eyes, pins 
and safety pins told in an interesting fashion by 
a pin with a head. "The Making of Hosiery." 
4 reels. The knitting of silk hosiery. "The 
Silken Web." 2 reels. A story of a thief, a 
pretty girl and a popular brand of stockings. 
"From Field to Foot." 5 reels. The manu- 
facture of cotton hosiery. "A Matter of Soles." 
1 reel. The manufacture ofleather soles. "The 
Love Belt." 1 reel. A romance based on a 
brand of machinery belts. "The Making of 
Leather Belts." 2 reels. "Danger Ahead." 1 
reel. The use of automobile headlights "Building 
Gridley Automatics." 2 reels. The manufac- 
ture of Gridley automatic screw machines. 
"Spirit of Progress." 3 reels. Manufacture of 
screws, nuts and bolts. "Road Building Ma- 
chinery and its Operations." 1 reel. "Nickel 



Welding Machine." 1 reel. "Carrying the Bur- 
den." 4 reels. The manufacture of electric- 
hoisting machinery. "Coaling Ships." 1 reel. 
The use of machinery for loading coal on large 
vessels. "Son of Adam." 2 reels. A rural 
drama showing how youth and love are tri- 
umphant over the drudge of farming^ thru the 
use of dairy machinery. "Heroes All. 1 reel. 
The use of motor cycles with side cars in giv- 
ing outings to convalescent soldiers and sailors. 
"Rack Ovens." V* reel. The manufacture of 
rack ovens. "Strengthen America." 1 reel. 
A striking argument for prohibition. "Island ot 
Yesterday." 1 reel. "Conquering the Jungle. 

I reel. Two one reel films showing the recla- 
mation of the Sumatra jungles and establish 
ment of rubber plantations in their stead. Hah 
its and customs of the inhabitants. "Sumatra 

II reels. The complete story of a rubber plan 
tation. "The Menace." 2 reels. Fire preven-^ 
tion by automatic sprinklers. "Danger Ahead." 
1 reel. The use of automobile headlights. "Care- 
less America." 1 reel. Prevention of automo- 
bile accidents. "Federal Ship Building Plant." 
1 reel. "Launching of S. S. Duquesne." 1 
reel "Keep the Flag at Sea." 2 reels. Ship 
building. "Sole Mates." 2 reels. A Pullman 
car cemedy built around a sample case of shoes. 
"My Lady's Wardrobe." 1 reel. The manu- 
facture of silk. "Silks and Satins." 2 reels. 
Manufacture and use of silks and satins. 
"Straight Goods." 1 reel. A story concern- 
ing a thief and the manufacture of silverware. 
"Skating Bobby McLean." 1 reel. Fancy skat- 
ing. "Blazing the Trail." 2 reels. Manufac- 
ture of spark plugs. "Fares Please." f reel. 
The operation of a one-man street car. "Tele- 
phone Inventors of Today." 3 reels. Western 
Electric telephone inventions. "The Romance of 
Thread." 1 reel. Embroidery thread from the 
sunny cotton fields to my day's boudoir. "Bur- 
den Bearers." 3 reels. Manufacture of solid 
truck tires. "Friends in Need." 2 reels. Man- 
ufacture of tire accessories. "Lightening the 
Load." 2 reels. Manufacture of giant pneu- 
matic tires. "Most Miles for a Dollar." 4 
reels. Manufacture of pneumatic tires. "Over 
the Roads to Victory." 1 reel. A test truck 
fleet tour. "Pneumatic Tire Rims." 1 reel. 
Manufacture of pneumatic tire rims. "Reasons- 
for Firestone Supremacy." 2 reels. The organ 
ization of Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. "Ship 
by Truck." 1 reel. The adaptability of trucks 
for short hauls. "Start Something." 1 reel. 
Description of a "Ship by Truck" organization. 
"Tire Abuse." 1 reel. "Trucking Through 
Dixie." 1 reel. A truck test tour thru the 
South. "Better Truck Tire Service." 1 reel. 
Truck tire test. "Care and Repair of Tires." 
1 reel. "Goodyear's Ahead." 3 reels. Motor- 
izing the farm. "From Fibre to Fabric." 5 
reels. Manufacture of the fabric in tires. "Rub. 
her Tires and Tubes." 1 reel. The manufac- 
ture of tires and tubes. "Packing Cigarettes." 
V 2 reel. "Smokes for a Nation." 1 reel. The 
largest shipment of tobacco ever reaching this 
country. "Care of the Teeth." 2 reels. Dental 
hygiene and the manufacture and packing of 
tooth paste. "My Lady's Veil." 2 reels. The 
making of veils. "Keep the Home Walls Smil- 
ing." 2 reels. The manufacture of wall paper. 
"The Acorn and the Oak." 1 reel. One of the 
five reels of this film is devoted to welfare work 
in a profit sharing manufacturing plant. "For 
the Common Good." 1 reel. Welfare work in 
a rubber tire factory. "A Day at Nowesoc." 
1 reel. Welfare work at the Northwestern 
Chemical Co. "From Field to Foot." 1 reel. 
Fifth reel of five reel picture showing manufac 
ture of cotton hosiery. "Awakening of Tim." 
3 reels. A story of loyalty to the firm in which 
welfare work is carried on among the em- 
ployees. "Sheperd Electric Factory." 1 reel. 
"Federal Ship Building Plant." 1 reel. "State 
of Illinois." 3 reels. State welfare institutions 
"Rolling Stone." 2 reels. Welfare work at a 
hosiery manufacturing plant. "Record Shipment 
of Wheat." 1 reel. The largest single ship- 
ment of wheat from this country. "Fascinating 
Art of Knitting. " 1 reel. The manufacture of 



175 



GILBERT P. HAMILTON 

Director- Ge?ieral 
LI. C. P. SMITH SYNDICATE 



176 



yarn, its use in knitting, knitted garments in 
use. 

Atlas Educational Film Co., Chicago, educational- 
industrial films: "Making Vesta Batteries." 
"Making Blue Prints." "Solving the Farm Help 
Problem." "Dairy Industry." "Poultry Rais- 
ing." "Sci^.itific Hog Raising." "Modern 
"Farming '' "A Modern Stock Farm." "Ayre- 
shires ai, •'. Berkshires." "Making Hogs Out of 
"Pigs." "Manufacture and Use of Spreaders." 
"Serpent's Tooth." "Jupiter's Thunderbolts." 
"In Trocoland." "Collosus of the Road." 
"Royal Ease." "Spirit of the Birch." "The 
Land of the Sky." "In the Fastness of the 
.Mountains." "Royal Gorge." 

Baumer Films, Inc., 6 West 48th St.: The Elec- 
tric Heart, A Mouthful of Wisdom, The Eye in 
the Dark, Canning Electricity, Signed and 
Scaled, Motor Truck Efficiency, The Bookkeep- 
ing Typewriter System, Fashions, Oil Lubri- 
cating Systems (Animated technical subject), 
all 1 reel ; The Concerto, The Evolution of Dry 
Cell Batteries and The Wonder of Wire, all 4 
reels ; The Evolution of Wet Cell Batteries, 2 
reels, and The Fireless Cooker, reel. 

Carlyle Ellis, Autographed Films. Our Children, 

2 reels, made for the Children's Bureau, U. S. 
Dept. of Labor. Story of the Children's Bu- 
reau Health Conference in one small typical 
town. Gadsden, Ola. Shows proper care of 
babies, public health nursing and how infant 
mortality may be reduced; In Middies and 
Bloomers, 1 reel ; made for the National Board 
V. W. C. A. Shows the Y. W. C. A. Sumn.er 
( amps that serve New York City as typical 
examples of camps for industrial and school 
girls. Emphasizes the value of camp life in 
the experience and bodily development of girls, 
i letting Together, 1 reel, made for the Y. W 
C. A. A picture record of the First National 
Conference of Working Girls sponsored by the 
Y. W. C. A., and the First National Congress 
of Working Women. Made in Washington. 
Scenic elements. We're Wrong About Shoes, 

3 reels, in series made for the Y. W. C. A., 
to educate women to the proper care of the 
feet through wearing feet shaped shoes. Home 
At the End, 1 reel, made for the Baptist Home 
for the Aged, of New York City to raise funds. 
An Equal Chance, 2 reels, made for the 
National Organization for Public Health Nurs- 
ing. The Woman Who Works, 3 reels, 
made for the Y. W. C. A. Open Doors, 
3 reels. A story of the Central Branch 
Young Women's Christian Association of the 
city of New York ; review of its activities told 
in story form. The influence of the Y. W. C. 
A, on Mabel from-the-Metropolis and Mildred 
from-Millsville, Pueblos and Piccaninnies, 1 reel. 
A story telling of the public health nurse's work 
among the Pueblos of New Mexico and the 
Negro children of Louisiana. The nurse's work 
runs throughout but is shared by the interest 
of the people and places. A Nurse Among The 
Teepers. 1 reel. A striking picture story of 
the public health nurse's fight for the health o : 
the Arapahoe Indians of Wyoming. There is 
very little nursing technique, but much human 
interest material and effective winter photog- 
raphy. Working Standards, 2 reels, made for 
the Women's^ Bureau of the U. S. Department 
of Labor. Fair Standards for working women 
of hours, wages and sanitary conditions as ad- 
vocated by the Bureau, are brought out in a 
strong dramatic story. 

The Venard Film Corp., Peoria, 111., Industrial : 
Avery Co., Peoria, 111., "Tractorizing Dad," 
Tractors: Comet Aut. Co., Decatur, 111. "A 
trip through the Comet Automobile Plant," U. S 
Tractor & Mach. Co., Menasha, Wis. "The 
Uncle Sam Tractors," John Lauson Mfg. Co., 
New Holstein, Wise. "The Lauson Tractor." 
Altorfer Bro., Peoria, 111. "Mandy's Cat- 
astrophe," Electric washing machines; Four- 
Drive Tractor Co., "The Four-Drive," Trac- 
tors; Renfrew Mach. Co., Renfrew, Ont., Can., 
"You Couldn't Separator," Cream separators 
and truck Scales; Weadows Man. Co., Bloom- 
ington, III., "Except and Including," Electric 



washing machines ; One Minute Man. Co., 
"When Dreams Come True," Electric washing 
machines; Barlow-Seelig Mfg. Co., "Jimmy," 
Electric washing machines; The Dunham Co., 
Berea, O., "Soil and Sense," Cultipacker ; 
Washington Dairy Co., Peoria. 111., "The Milky 
Way," Nursey milk; J. D. Adams Co., Indian 
polis, Ind., "Better Roads," Road Graders; J. 
I. Case Plow Works Co., Racine, Wis., "The 
Passing of Dub Wilson," Tractors; Parrett 
Machinery Corp., Chicago, 111. "One Team 
Less," Tractors. 



THE NATIONAL MOTION PIC- 
TURE LEAGUE 

The purpose of this organization with head- 
quarters at 381 4th Avenue is a concentrated cam- 
paign of education and publicity: 1st, by proper 
publicity for good pictures . and a campaign of 
education against the immoral ones ; 2nd, by con- 
ducting and supervising children's matinees, and 
assisting churches, boards of education, parents' 
associations and other organizations interested in 
public welfare, to secure proper pictures for adults, 
young people and children. 

The Reviewing Board of the League is com- 
posed of ministers, Sunday school leaders, teach 
ers and public welfare workers. They select from 
all motion pictures manufactured those that are 
suitable for adults, young people and children, and 
list the names of these pictures in Current Weeklj 
Bulletins, before the pictures are released to any 
theaters. This advance knowledge is supplied to 
all members of the League and subscribers to the 
Bulletin, giving to them the power of selection 
which enables them to patronize only the best 
motion pictures that are shown in theaters. This 
ever increasing demand stimulates the production 
of wholesome films. The lists are also sent to 
producers of motion pictures and managers of the- 
aters and are published in arious magazines and 
newspapers. 

This publicity now reaches about 800,000 read- 
ers. The aim is publicity to 5,000,000 readers by 
fall, 1920. 

The organization is supported entirely by its 
membership and by donations from persons not 
interested financially in the Motion Picture Indus- 
try, and by the sale of its Bulletins. 

Among those who are fostering this movement 
are Dr. Wm. L. Etinger, Supt. of N. Y. City 
Public Schools :Mr. Daniel Carter Beard, Boy 
Scouts of America; Mrs. Maud T. Baldwin, In- 
ternational Sunday School Association: Miss Bes- 
sie Locke, National Kindergarten Association ; 
Mr. Adolph Lewisohn, Mr. Owen Lovejoy, Mrs. 
Henry Phipps and Mr. Thomas W. Churchill. 

The directors include: Mrs. H. G. Armstrong, 
New York City; Mrs. Maud T. Baldwin, Chicago. 
111.; Mrs. T. W. Barnes, New York City; Mrs. 
Dw ight E. Bartlett, Providence. R. I. ; Mr. George 
Gordon Battle, New York City ; Mr. Daniel Car 
ter Beard, Flushing, L. I. ; Miss Bernice W. Bell. 
Louisville, Ky. ; Mr. George A. Bellamy, Cleve- 
land, O. ; Mrs. E. E. Bogart. Mt. Vernon, New 
York ; Mr. E. E. Bogart, New York City ; Mrs. 
Sidney C. Borg, New York City ; Mr. Dwight E. 
Breed. Austin, Tex. ; Mrs. J. T. Burcham. Spo- 
kane, Wash. ; Mr. C. C. Carstens. Boston, Mass. ; 
Mrs. J. W. Chivers, Helena, Mont. ; Mr. Thomas 
W. Churchill, New York City ; Mrs. Irving Crane, 
New York City; Mr. Robert A. Crosby. New York 
City ; Mr. Grafton D. Cushing, Boston, Mass. ; 
Mr. J- H. Denbigh, New York City; Mrs. W. C. 
Eakins. Arlington, N. L, and Ernest D. Easton, 
Newark, N. J. 

Executive Staff : Adele F. Woodard, President : 
Daniel Carter Beard, 1st Vice-President; Dr. Wm. 
L. Ettinger, 2nd Vice-President ; Dr. Lee K. 
Frankel, Treasurer; Mrs. J. T. Burcham, Film 
Librarian ; Dr. Philip P. Jacobs, Advisory Secre- 
tary. 

Executive Committee : Mr. Thomas W. Church- 
ill, Chairman; Rev. F. E. Johnson. George Gor- 
don Battle, Gustave Straubenmnller, Mrs. Irving 
Crane and Miss Bessie Locke. 

The organization issues a bulletin weekly tell- 
ing which are the best productions for the fam- 
ily, the best constructional and which productions 
are best suited for children. 

Publicity secured through magazines, daily 
newspapers, etc. 



177 




CLYDE FILLMORE 

Current Releases 
"THE DEVIL"S PASSKEY" 
"NURSE MARJOR1E" with Maty Miles Minter "CROOKED STREETS" with Ethel Clayton 
"THE LADDER OF LIES" with Ethel Clayton "THE CITY SPARROW" with Ethel Clayton 
Now with Famous-Players-Lasky Corporation 



178 



The Short Reel Outlook 



Expects Rapidly Growing Demand 

In my opinion the motion picture year of 1920- 
1921, will see the rapidly growing demand on the 
part of theaters for short subjects increase to 100 
per cent, of the exhibitors of the country. 

This is something more than a theory with us, 
for we have backed this belief with far the largest 
investment ever made in the short subject field, 
and our plans for the immediate future includes 
a still further expansion and a constant growth 
that we have arranged for on a scale sufficiently 
large to care for the increasing demand that we 
know will be shown month after month. 

Our conviction that the theater required short 
subjects of the first quality has been expressed 
for more than five years in the existence of Edu- 
cational Films, which was established in 1915, and 
which has never left the field that it selected for 
its own. Since we were pioneers, our growth at 
first was naturally slow, but we have seen the 
demand for this product grow from but a few 
scattered exhibitors to every theater of importance 
in this country. 

This growth has been due largely to the care 
that we have exerted in selection of product, 
proven by the fact that there is stilla wholesome 
demand for the pictures that we released in our 
first year. 

Our plans, from the first, have included a sales 
and distribution organization covering the United 
States and Canada, but we have carefully avoided 
the temptation of over production and over organ- 
ization until the field was ready. That time is 
now here, so we have, through Educational Film 
Exchanges, Inc., now established branch offices of 
our own in the twenty-five recognized distributing 
centers of the United States, and the six centers 
in Canada. In the British Isles we are associated 
with Ideal Film Renting Co., Ltd. 

With the organization of our own distribution 
system, we have met the demand on our organiza- 
tion for comedies of the same standard as our 
other releases. Already we have received convinc- 
ing proof that we are filling an important need. 

We will continue to remain in the market for 
the purchase of such pictures of these general 
classes as meet our quality standard and for the 
distribution of similar series for national and semi- 
public organizations, which have shown such a 
flattering faith in our company. 

Briefly, we stand ready to supply distribution to 
comedies, and such other short subjects as we 
regard as sufficiently meritorious to have the ben- 
efit of the reputation of our organization for five 
years. 

In less than a year our investments and our 
contracts have run into the millions. We have 
still further and bigger plans in view. 

Our acts, we believe, offer the best evidence of 
our belief that the outlook for short subjects, 
especially for our organization, is un"sual. 

E. W. HAMMONS, Educational. 

Short Subjects Come Into Their Own 

Any question that has ever existed as to the 
attitude of Famous Players-Lasky towards the 
short subject must have been effectively answered 
in the organization's recent step in establishing a 
short subjects department with a distinctive sales' 
force which will devote itself entirely to this de- 
partment. 

This move evidences better than anything else 
could our conviction on the future of the short 
subject. Under the direction of W. F. Rodgcrs. 
the new department will concentrate its activities 
upon demonstrating to exhibitors throughout the 
country the box-office value of short subjects of 
genuine merit. To succeed in this, it is necessary 
that the short subject be selected with the same 
discrimination that is given a super-special and 
prepared with the artistry, direction and photo- 
graphy of a feature subject. This is the goal 
toward which we are striving on all short sub- 
jects during the coming year with which the name 



of Paramount is to be associated. While the pro- 
gress of the last three years, the past season 
especially, have been very satisfactory and rapid, 
we feel that the coming year will be a revelation 
in the progress of the short subject from an artis- 
tic standpoint and the variety of subjects pre- 

sented - "AL" LICHTMAN. 

Famous Players-Lasky. 

Increased Demand for Short Stuff 

The season of 1920-1921 will show an increased 
demand for short subjects. During the last year 
the exhibitor has come to realize that his audi- 
ence expects something more than the so-called 
"feature." He knows that many a program has 
been saved by two or three single reels, which in- 
terested and amused his audiences after the feat- 
ure had fallen flat. BjjfjNET, Pathe. 

Many Changes Made 

More changes have been made in the past 
year in the short subject market than m any 
other branch of the film industry, the first move 
having been the attempt on the part of many 
short subject manufacturers to devote their efforts 
entirely to the production of five reel comedies. 

Although there are more than two reel com- 
edies being made now than ever before, yet it is 
a fact that the number of producers of two reel 
comedies and other short subjects which are of a 
standard has decreased. 

There are probably only one or two two-reel 
screen comedians, and possibly only one, who 
can stand feature length productions. 

P. W. DOWLIXG, 

Christie Film. 

Important Factor in Every Program 

Requests for good short reels on the indenpend- 
ent market and from exhibitors are greater than 
even at the present time and prospects for the 
coming year are brighter than they have ever 
been in the past. The fact that newspaper critics 
are now devoting more space to them in their 
reviews may be regarded as significant. 

1 should like to bring out the point that for 
actual educational value, short reels rank supreme. 
People will rapidly forget features which as a 
rule merely entertain but one and two reel offer- 
ings, such as scenics, scientific subjects and kind- 
ered pictures, leave a lasting impression. 

Invariably, short subjects form at least one- 
third of the show and the farsighted exhibitor will 
not depend upon some feature which is a good 
drawing card, to pack them in and then inflict 
some cheap, trashy or old comedies and scenics 
on them. A good feature, backed up with short 
stuff of inferior quality accentuates the deficien- 
cies of the latter. To-day. the single and two 
reelers are not only fillers — they must be good, or 
the reputation of the house suffers. COHN 

The Importance of the Short Subject 

More attention will be paid to short subjects 
during the coming year than ever before. Con- 
ditions generally relating to the short subject are 
better than ever before, due to the fact that the 
exhibitors are now realizing the importance the 
short subject plays in their program. 

In the past the single reel, or even the two- 
reel comedy has been looked upon too often as 
merely a filler. Exhibitors have contracted for 
fifty-two weeks of "short stuff," regardless of the 
duality of the production and have taken any- 
thing 'that the distributor cared to hand out. 

This condition, I am happy to say, is rapidly 
changing and as an illustration one has only to 
sight the fact that exhibitors generally are select- 
ing their short subjects with as much care as they 
do their features. A selective booking will be the 
rule during the coming year and the exhibitor 
will be as careful to secure a single reel or a two 
reel subject that will complement their feature, 
as they will be of any other feature of their 
business. 

W, E, SHALLENBERGEU, Arrow. 



179 



Some 



Men You Know 




RICHARD A. ROWLAND, OSCAR A. PRICE HARRY O. SCHWALBE, 

Pres. Metro Pictures Corp. President Asso. Producers Sec. & Treas. Ass. 1st Nat. Ex 

180 




WM. A. BRADY JOHN D. WILLIAMS WINFIELD R. SHEEHAN 

W .A. Brady Productions Mgr. Asso. 1st Nat'l Exh. Fox Film Corp. 




CARL LAEMMLE JESSE L. LASKY LEWIS J. SELZNICK 

President Universal Co. V.-Pres. Famous Players-Lasky Pres. Select Pic. Corp. 




PAUL CROMELIN HIRAM ABRAMS W. W. HODKINSON 

Inter-Ocean Film Co. Pres. United Artists Pres. W. W. Hodkinson Corp. 



181 



D. W. GRIFFITH, 
Griffith r red. 



CECIL B. DeMILLE 
Famous Players-Lasky 



JAMES VINCENT 
Pres. M. P. D. A. 





FELIX FEIST 
Goldwyn 




W. R. ("Watty") ROTHACKER 



ARTHUR S. KIRKPATRICK 

Robertson-Cole 





'AL" LICHTMAN 
Famous Players 



JOS. W. ENGEL 
Treas. Metro Pictures Corp. 



ARTHUR S. KANE 
Arthur S. Kane Pict. Corp. 




SAM MORRIS 
Selznick Enter. 



R. H. COCHRANE 
Vice-Pres. Universal Co. 

183 



W. E. ATKINSON 
Gen. Mgr. Metro 




S. BARRETT McCORMICK 
Toledo, O. 



JOHN C. FLINN 
Famous Players-Lasky 

1S4 



JAKE WELLS 
Richmond, Va. 




"JIMMY" GRAINGER B. J. ("Bernie") DEPKIN RALPH TALBOT 

Marshall Neilan Prod. Baltimore Oklahoma 




H. C. ("Doc") HORATOR HARRY CRANDALL FRANK J. REMBUSCH 

Toledo, O. Washington, D. C. The Stormy Petrel 




JAY J. ALLEN "ABE" BLANK TOM MOORE 

Canada A. H. Blank Enter. Washington 

185 



A BELA VIRAGH-FLOWER 

Art Director 



Creator of interiors 
that suggest art, 
beauty, simplicity and 
expressive atmosphere 
for the Stars and 
Players that inspire 
the vital element in 
their Art. 



Interiors designed for 
1920 Photo Plays 

Even as Eve 

Empty Arms 

Idle Hands 

A Good Woman 

Diana of Star Hollow 




186 



American Society of Cinematographers 

I Tame Company, Director or Star Studio 

David Abel Selznick Brunton 

John Arnold Viola Dana Metro 

♦Joe August Wm. S. Hart Hart 

Friend F. Baker All-Star Vitagraph 

Wm. J. Beckway Edith Sterling Productions Balboa 

R. J. Bergquist Nazimova Metro 

*H. Lyman Broening Neilan-Kaufman Hollywood 

L. D. Clawson Raoul Walsh New York 

Henry Cronjager 

A. M. Davey National 

Ernest S. Depew Master Pictures, Inc 

J. A. Dubray Lew Cody Brunton 

Arthur Edeson Clara Kimball Young Gars^on 

Perry Evans Mack Sennett 

William Fildew Priscilla Dean Universal 

Ross G. Fisher Carter De Haven Comedies Haworth 

*Wm. C. Foster Lois Weber Lois Weber 

Harry M. Fowler 

*T. G. Gaudio Allan Dwan Productions Brunton 

Harry W. Gersted Wm. Desmond J. D. Hampton 

♦Frank B. Good Tom Mix Fox 

Fred L. Granville Directing Samuelson Productions England 

*King D. Gray Ben Wilson Productions Berwilla 

♦Walter L. Griffin James Oliver Curwood Productions Universal 

Alois G. Heimerl Mgr. photographic department American 

George Hill Brunton 

*F. W. Jackman Supervising cinematographer Mack Sennett 

J. D. Jennings Goldwyn 

Charles E. Kaufman Artograph Company 7520 Sunset Blvd. 

Roy H. Klaffki Charge of photography and laboratory Metro 

H. F. Koenekamp Larry Semon Vitagraph 

Edward Kull Directing at Universal 

R. B. Kurrle Edwin Carewe Mayer 

Sam Landers Annette Kellerman Brunton 

Walter Lundin Rolin Film Culver City 

Chester A. Lyons Charles Ray Charles Ray 

Reggie Lyons Frances Edmonde Garsson 

Jack Mackenzie Earle Williams Vitagraph 

Hugh C. McClung David Butler Hollywood 

William M. McGann Douglas Fairbanks Fairbanks 

Victor Milner H. B. W arner J. D. Hampton 

Ira H. Morgan Donald Crisp Hollywood 

♦Robert S. Newhard. ...... .Dustin Farnum Brunton 

*S. S. Norton Coburn Productions Culver City 

Ernest S. Palmer George Loane Tucker Productions Brunton 

Paul P. Perry George Melford Lasky 

G. C. Peterson Charles Hutchison Brunton 

Sol Polito Bert Lytell Metro, N. Y. 

B. F. Reynolds Yon Stroheim Universal 

George Rizard American 

♦Philip E .Rosen Directing at Universal 

♦Charles G. Rosher Marshall Neilan Hollywood 

A. Scholtz Charge of laboratory D. W. Griffith, N. Y. 

C. E. Schoenbaum Bryant Washburn Morosco 

John F. Seitz Rex Ingram Metro 

♦Homer A. Scott Tourneur Productions Universal 

W. S. Smith Joe Ryan Vitagraph 

Harry Thorpe Douglas Fairbanks .Fairbanks 

R. H. Totheroh Charlie Chaplin Chaplin 

J. C. Van Trees Wm. D. Taylor Productions Lasky 

Gilbert Warrenton Frank Borzage (Cosmopolitan) New York 

Philip H. Whitman Fox Sunshine 

♦L. Guy Wilky Wm. De Mille Productions Lasky 



♦Member of the Board of Governors. 



187 



HUGH THOMPSON 

Recent Release 
"The Slim Princess" with Mabel Normand 

Coining Re/cases 
"Head Over Heels" with Mabel Normand 

"What Happened to Rosa" with Mabel X« rmand 



188 



THEATER OWNERS ASSO., INC. 

Headquarters, 731 S. Hill St., Los Angeles 

Officers: H. H. Bosley, President, Alhambra 
theater, Los Angeles; Michael Gore, 1st Vice 
President, Liberty Theater, Los Angeles; C. E. 
Walker, 2nd Vice President, Princess Theater, 
Santa Ana ; Glenn Harper, Secretary, Apollo 
Theater, Los Angeles; J. M. Young, Treasurer, 
Apollo Theater, Hollywood; Willard Wyatt, Ser- 
geant at-Arms, Rosebud Theater, Los Angeles; 
W. VV. Whitson, Director. Plaza Theater, San 
Diego; F. R. Alexander, Director. Iris Theater, 
Hollywood; J. S. Lustig, Director, Starland The- 
ater. Los Angeles. 

List of Members 

Where city is not mentioned locations are m 
I. os Angeles. 

F. O. Adler, Victoria, San Pedro; O. H. Ander- 
son. Suvuv. 5326 Central Ave.; L. H. Baumgart- 
ner, Glen City, Santa Paula; G. S. Bell, New 
Theater. I nglewood ; Geo Hush, Attorney, 404 
Van N'uvs Bldg. ; L L. Bard, College, 5th & 
Hill Sts II H. Bosley, Alhambra, 731 S. Hill 
St.; ('. W Blake. Gayety, 24th & Central; H. B. 
Breckwedel, Symphony. 614 S. Broadway; Wal 
lace Carter. Arlington. Arlington & Wash.; W. 
E. Brown. Merryland, 1013 E. 7 St.; Arthur 
Wenzel, Victory, 9th & Broadway; Mrs. R. C. 
Cassil, Colonial. Monrovia ; C. G. Davis, Star, 
28th & San Pedro Sts. : Donley & Bolinger, Fairy- 
land. Long Beach; T. Dorner, Globe, San Pedro: 
Frank Dorner, Sunbeam, 56th & Pasadena Ave.; 
W. T. Fahey, Palace. Long Beach; P. L. Fer- 
ron, Sumbean, 1408 Pico St.; J. W. Froehhch, 
(•'.nil. ire. 2131 W. Pice St.; K. C. Manny, Meralta, 
2033 E. 1st St.; A. S. Fijalkowsky, Walker, 730 
S Grand Ave. ; A. L. Gore, Optic, 533 S. Main 
St.; M. Gore. Liberty. 3rd and Main St.; C. H. 
Fraff, Washington. 743 W. Washington : Frank 
A. Grant, Windsor. 2nd & Western: Glenn Mar- 
per. Applo. 48th & Vermont; J. E. Harrigan. 
Georgia, 9th & Georgia: Jos. 'A. Hessel, Mission 
42nd & Moneta; M. W. Hill. Crown. Sawtelle, 
Calif. ; C. L. Head, Anaheim Theater Co., Ana- 
heim ; C. A. Howe. Regent, Riverside; Wm. A 
Hussev, Lincoln, 2604 N. Bdwy.; W. F. Jensen, 
Theatorium, 1624 Sunset Blvd ; R. S. Jensen. 
Palace Grand, Glendale ; P. Lasher, Keystone. 
1520 E. First St.; Lewis & Byrd. Neptune. Ven- 
ice; J. L. Lazarus, Palace, 7th near Bdwy.; B. 
H. Lustig, Dreamland, 3021 S. Main St.; J. S. 
Lustig, Starland, 2624 N. Bdwy. ; J. J. Mathie. 
Alvarado, 710 S. Alvarado : F. A. McDonald, 730 
S Olive St.; Pearl Merrill. Culver City, Then. 
Culver City; F. A.. Miller. Miller's 9th & Main 
Sts.; L. F. O'Donnell, Shamrock. 608 S. Mill St.; 
Ray Pagenkopf, New Palace, 4725 Moneta Ave. : 
M M. Ravmond, Georgia, 9th and Georgia; Leo 
Ryan. S02'S. Olive St.; C. B. Ritting, Colonial, 
So. Pasadena ; Florence Theater Corp., Florence, 
77C E. Colorado, Pasadena; R. W. Mc Kinney, 
Playhouse, 1234^ W. 7th St.; Superba The- 
ater Manager, 514 S. Broadway; C. M. Macauley, 
St. Andrews, 1872 Jefferson; J. Sams, Rosemary, 
Ocean Park ; O. W. Lewis, Alhambra, Alhambra ; 
F. L. Shaffer, De Luxe, 6th & Alvarado; O. H. 
Schlensener, Superba, Alhambra ; L. S. Schlesinger, 
West End, Santa Ana; H. J. Siler. Galo, Whittier; 

D. S. McCarthy, Symphony. 5th & Bdwy. ; J. Paul 
Swickard, Univertisv, 931 W Jefferson: K. C. 
Manny, Owl, 1044 W. Temple St.; J. J. Tully, 
Elite, 3818 S. Park; J. V. Spaugh, Euclide, On- 
tario; E. A. Thompson, Olympus, 2014 E. First 
St. ; T. L. Tally, Tally's Broadway, 833 S. 
Bdwy. J Thomas & Henze, Empire, San Pedro; 

E. W. Williams, Crescent, 48th & Western; D. 

B. Van Derlip, Huntington, Huntington Park : 
Augustin Casillas, Jefferson, 2117 W. Jefferson 
St. ; J. A. Van Dyke, Rose, 3rd & Figueroa St. ; 

C. E. Walker, Princess, Santa Ana; G. P. Walker. 
Colonial, 54th & Vermont: Williard Wyatt, Rose- 
bud, 20th & Central; H. L. Wilbur, Rialto, Ful- 
lerton; E. L. Wertheim, New Central, 17th & 
Central; W. W. Whitson, Plaza, San Diego; 
Wilm & Van Deberg, Victoria. 2570 W. Pico St. ; 
C. W. Young, Globe, 3511 Central Ave.; J. M. 
Youne. Ano'lo ; F. D. Yost, Yost. Santa Ana ; 
L. Zuttermister, Grand, Riverside; C. E. Zim- 
merman, .Majestic. San I'edro ; J. B. Zeller, Iris. 



IND. EXHIB. CORP. CIRCUIT 

Seattle — Members of the Ind. Exh. Corp., form 
ed in July, 1920. by Jensen and Von Herberg: 

Theaters representing the Jensen and Von Her 
berg interests: Liberty, Coliseum, Rex and Strand, 
in Seattle; Liberty Columbia, Majestic, Peoples. 
Star, and Union Ave., in Portland; .Rialto, 
Colonial, Victory, Strand, and Sunset, in Ta- 
coma; Rialto and People's in Butte; Liberty m 
Yakima; Rialto, Dream and Rex, in Bremerton; 
represented by J. J. Parker. P. E. Noble, and 
Claud Jensen in Portland; H. T. Moore in la- 
coma; E. J. Myrick in Yakima; M. Rosenberg in 
Bremerton. 

Joe Danz, controlling Little, Imperial, Rialto. 
Isis, Dream, in Seattle. George Ring, Society 
theater, Seattle. Geddes and Geddes, Ye College. 
Majestic and Empress, Ballard; Fremont the- 
ater, Fremont. 

Mercy Amusement Co.. controlling Majestic. 
Empress and Yakima, Yakima. Swanson and 
McKee, controlling the Everett. Orpheum, Star, 
Broadway Apollo, in Everett. 

Simons and Turner (Northwest Amusement 
Co.), controlling the Empress, Liberty, Isis, and 
Bijou theaters in Missoula. Mont; the Liberty 
and Grand, in Wallace. Idaho: the Liberty m 
Mullan, Idaho; the Liberty and Princess in Kel 
logg, Idaho. 

J. W. Allender, controlling the Majestic and 
Lyric theaters in Spokane; the Liberty theaters 
in Pullman, Colfax and Moscow. 

William G. Kipley of the Western Amusement 
Co., controlling the Rex and Bijou in Aberdeen 
and the Grand, Liberty and Rialto in Centralia. 

Edward Dolan controlling the Weir and Dream, 
in Aberdeen. W. A. Long, Star, Oregon City, 
Oregon. 

A. Bettingen. Empress and Grand, The Dalles. 
' h egon, Greulich & Matlock 

Pastime, Pendelton. uhiteside Bros., Majestic 
and Crystal. Corvallis; Dennis M. Hull, Liberty. 
North Bend, Ore., O. M. Whittington, Grand 
and Liberty, Bend. Ore., Hill and Hudson of the 
Globe Theaters Co., Globe and Liberty, Albany. 
Oregon; Antlers and Majestic, Roseburg ; Gem 
Sutherland; Bungalow. Ooakland. 

George A. Hunt and Co.. Rialto, Page and 
Liberty. Medford, Oregon; Star and Liberty, 
Grants Pass; Rialto, Ashland. 

Meyers & Ford. Arcade and Star, LaGrande, 
Oregon; A. S. Kolstad, Liberty and Gem. Hood 
River. T. E. O'Neil. Rainbow, Star and Im- 
perial, McXinnville; K. L. Burke, Baker, 
Orpheum and Empire. Baker, Oregon ; Si Danz, 
Astoria Amusement Co.. Liberty, Star and Sun- 
set, Astoria: George B. Gutherie, Oregon the- 
ater, Salem ; George Bligh, Le Liberty and 
Bligh, Salem; Marsden & Noble, Orpheum and 
Noble theaters, Marshfield. 

Louis Kastner, Liberty, Gem and Wenatclue. 
Wenatchee, Wash., E. C. O'Keefe, Regent Kil- 
lings, Mont. Louis Babock, Babcock theater. Bil- 
lings. E. P. White, Strand, Livingston. Mont. 
A. Nadeau, Blue Bird, Anaconda, Mont. J. D. 
Rice, Dream, Chehalis and Onalasna. E. J. 
Reynolds, Liberty and Empire, Pasco. A. Mat- 
techeck, Princess, Kennewick. 

W. S. Quimby, Liberty, Star and Bell Belling- 
ham. nr. H. M. Johnson, Lois and Lyric, Top- 
penish, J. C. Pascius, Princess, Prosser. 



BROADWAY CAPACITIES 



Seating 

Theaters Capacity 

Capitol 5,200 

New York 1.633 

New York Roof 1.200 

Rialto 1.960 

Rivoli 2.206 

Strand 2.989 

Broadway 1.700 



189 



JUAN IT A HANSEN 

PA THE SERIAL STAR 



190 




The M. P. T. O. of America 

By Sydney S. Cohen, President 



This is emphatically an exhibitor's year. The 
wave of enthusiasm which has swept over the en- 
tire country and reached its tidal height at Cleve- 
land, shows no sign of subsidence. After many 
years of failure largely due to incompetent lead 
ership, the exhibitors of the country have at last 
united into a great body which has shown its cap- 
ability of dealing with the problems of the ex- 
hibitor. 

The united councils and combined action of the 
Cleveland Convention were largely brought about 
by the common evils which beset the exhibitors. 
The greatest of these we consider the unfair com- 
petition of producing interests with the independ- 
ent exhibitors. Scarcely three months have passed 
since the adjournment of the convention and the 
organization has obtained the solemn pledge of 
Mr. Adolph Zukor, President of the Famous Play 
ers-Lasky Corp., to the fact that he will not buy 




SYDNEY S. COHEN 

or build competitive theaters to coerce the inde- 
pendent exhibitors. These pledges were made 
both by word of mouth and in writing, and we 
have every hope that they will be faithfully kept. 
This is the first step towards the elimination of 
unfair competition in the exhibiting field. Much, 
we realize, remains to be done and the organiza- 
tion proposes to address itself with all the zeal 
and earnestness possible to the abolition of the 
iniquitous five per cent film rental tax. A cam- 
paign to kill the most unjust of taxes is under 
way. 

We are also grappling with the music tax sit- 
uation which promises to develop favorably for 
the exhibitor. 

We have the assurances of practically all of the 
big producers that they will cooperate in work- 
ing out a more equitable contract for film rentals. 
The one-sidedness of the present form of contract 
is generally recognized. All the state organiza- 
tions are hard at work to secure the passage in 
other states of the law which has safeguarded de- 
posits exacted in the State of New York. 

No one who attended the Cleveland Convention 
could fail to notice the remarkable personnel of 
the delegates. They challenge comparison with 
men in any profession or walk in life. Not the 
least notable thing was their keen sense of respon- 
sibility to the public which they serve. These men 
showed that they were fully conscious of the great 
motion picture going public and the mission of the 
screen. 

The Cleveland Convention marks a new era 
and a new deal. 

OFFICERS 

SYDNEY S. COHEN, New York, N. Y. 
President 
C. C. GRIFFIN, Oakland, Cal. 
Vice President 



JOSEPH HOPP. Chicago, 111. 
2d Vice-President 
W. C. PATTERSON, Atlanta, Ga. 
3d Vice-President 
C. W. GATES, Aberdeen, S. D. 
4th Vice-President 
E. T. PETER, Dallas, Texas 
Treasurer 
SAM BULLOCK, Cleveland, O. 
Executive Secretary 
M. VAN PRAAG, Kansas City, Kan. 
Recording Secretary 
Executive Committee: A. C. Hayman, Niagara 
Falls, N. Y. ; C. L. O'Reilly, New York, N. Y. 
W. H. Linton, Utica. N. Y. ; S. Kanter, Norwalk 
(dim.; Ernest H. Horstman, Worcester, Mass 
loseph Stern, Newark, N. J. ; John S. Evans 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Henry Poke, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
C. E. Whitehurst, Baltimore. Md. ; H. H. Lustig 
Cleveland, O. ; J. C. Ritter, Detroit, Mich.; F 
Fembusch, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Dr. H. Q. Alex 
ander, Dayton, O. ; Roland Hill, Greensboro, N 
C. ; H. C. Farley, Montgomery, Ala.; A. J. Beth 
encourt, Houma, La. ; W. D. Burford, Aurora 
111.; W. A. Steffes, Minneapolis, Minn.; Fred 
Seegert, Milwaukee, Wis. ; A. R. Pramer, Omaha 
Neb. ; Jos. Mogler, St. Louis, Mo. ; Chas. Bur 
key, Kansas City, Mo. ; Ralph Talbot, Tulsa 
Okla. : A. W. Lilly, Greenville, Tex.; M. C. Kel 
log, Lead, S. D. ; Glenn Harper. Los Angeles 
Cal. ; Daniel Markowitz, San Francisco, Cal. 
Jake Wells. Norfolk, Va. ; Geo. H. Grombacher, 
Spokane, Wash. 

Committee on Business Relations 

C. C. Griffin, San Francisco. Cal. 

J. C. Ritter, Detroit. Mich. 

C. H. Burkey, Kansas City, Mo. 

Moe Horowitz, Cleveland. Ohio. 

Roland Hill, Greensboro, N. C. 

John S. Evans, Philadelphia, Pa. 

C. A. Hayinan, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Sydney Samuelson, Newton, N. J. 

Committee on Protection of the Screen 

Fred J. Herrington, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

W. L. McLaren, lackson, Mich. 

Dr. H. Q. Alexander. Dayton, Ohio. 

A. B. Smith, Salem, N. J. 

R. G. Liggett, Kansas City, Kan. 

A. L. Larkin, Anaka, Minn. 

F. G. Heller, Anderson. Ind. 

T. M. Salyeods, Rochester, N. Y. 

Committee on Laws and Legislation 

John Mannheimer, Chairman, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

H. H. Lustig. Cleveland, O. 

Maurice Choyinskie, Chicago, III. 

H. Webster Smith, Bath, Md. 

T. L. Hays, Minneapolis. Minn. 

A. T. Klast, Pontiac, Mich. 

C. H. Goodwin, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Frank Rembusch, Shelbyville, Ind. 

Committee on Constitution and By-Laws 

Ralph Talbot, Chairman. Tulsa, Okla. 

Toe Hopp, Chicago, 111. 

Leo Brecher, New York, N. Y. 

C. Whitehurst, Baltimore, Md. 

W. J. Shimon, Cleveland, O. 

David Barrist, Philadelphia, Pa. 

L. F. O'Donnell. Los Angeles, Cal. 

A. J. Bethencourt, Houma. La. 

Committee on Ways and Means — Finance 

E. T. Peter, Dallas, Tex. 

M. Van Praag, Kansas City, Kans. 

Sam Bullock, Cleveland, O. 

J. T. Collins, Rutherford, N. T. 

W. AI. Steffes, Minneapolis, Minn. 

C. C. Griffin, San Francisco. Cal. 

Win, Brandt, Brooklyn, \. Y. 



191 




HAMPTON DEL RUTH 

Producing Comedies Independently 



192 



Theater Chains 



Some of the larger aii'l more important theaters not given here will be found hi the list of 
First Run houses. 



Alabama 

Anniston — A. L. Thomas: Lyric and others. 

Bessemer. — J. A. Synder : Grand and others. 

Birmingham — Mudd & Colley Amuse. Co. : Tri- 
anon and Rialto. Marvin Wise : Alcazar and 
( )deon. 

Demopolis — Simon Theater Co. : operates in 4 

tO N IIS. 

Cadsden — Will Wood: Belle and Alamo. 
Mussel — M. A. Lightner: Wilson and Fields. 
1 alladega — T. F. Ware: Star and others. 
Tuscaloosa — Mrs. R. H. Little; Diamond and 

others. 

Arizona 

Mesa — Wm. Menhennet : Majestic ; Chandler 
( handler; Opera House, Tempe. 

Phoenix — Phoenix Amusement Co. : Columbia, 
Amusu; Rex, Hayden ; Isis, Florence; Iris, Ray; 
Litchfield, Litchfield; Goodyear, Goodyear. 

Richards & Nace Enterprises: Strand, La- 
mara, Hippodrome, Ramona and Riverside Park, 
Phoenix and Rialto, Phoenix. 

Tucson — -Lyric Amusement Co.: Lyric; Lyric 
ami Grand, Douglas; Nogales, Nogales ; Grand 
and Lyric, Bisbee; Liberty, Yuma. 

Yuma — J. J. Johansen (also Somerton). 

Arkansas 

Alix — Nat Weishaupt : Alice and Electric, 

Alius. 

Fayetteville — E. C. Robertson : Victory and 
Lyric. 

Harrison — D. E. Fitton ; Lyric and Grand, 

Searcy. 

Horatio — F. W. Yahraus : Ratio and Sur- 
prise, Locksburg. 

Jonesboro — Jonesboro Amuse. Co. : 3 in Jones- 

boro. 

Little Rock — Sol S. Harris : Ketnpner, Gem, 
Royal and Crystal. 

Pine Bluff. — O. C. Hauber : 1 in Coway ; 1 in 
England. 

Springdale — L. C. Gelling: Gem; with E. C. 
Robertson, Lyric, Rogers. 

California 

Anaheim — C. L. Head. 

Bakersfield — Grogg Amuse. Co. : New California, 
Pastime, Hippodrome and Bakersfield, Bakersfield. 

El Centro— Billy Schnell (also Brawley). 

Hollywood — Hollywood Theaters, Inc. : Wind- 
sor. Los Angeles; Hollywood, Apollo and New 
Hollywood, Hollywood. 

Los Angeles — Patterson & Thompson, Claude 
Halsell, Johnny Young, Lustig and Williams 
V\ yatt and Wortheim, Jensen Bros : (also Glen- 
dale and Pasadena). 

Sol Lesser and Gore Bros. : American and 
Belvidere, Pomona. 

Oakland — Beach & Krahn Amuse. Co. 

Oznard — Guy Douthwaite. 

San Bernardino — J. G. Knapp. 

Santa Ana. — Yost Theater Co. 

Santa Barbara — California Theater Co. 

San Diego — Bush Theaters: Superba. Broad- 
way and Silver Strand, J. B. Mason, Mrs. J. Mc- 
Vay . 

San Jose — Liberty Theater Co. : San Jose and 
Fresno houses. 

Venice — Lewis and Byrd (also Pomona). 

Canada 

Black Lake — Bey : Houses #t Thetford Mines 
and Black Lake. 

East Angus — Bernstein : Houses at Fast Angus. 
Windsor Mills and North Hatley. 

Halifax — L. R. Acker: Orpheus, Family, Hali 
(ax; Palace, Sydney. J. M. Franklin: Strand, 
Halifax; Strand, Sydney; Opera House, St. John 
R. J, McAdam : Casino, Halifax ; Casino, Syd- 
ney ; Casino, New Waterford. 



New Glasgow — N. W. Mason: Academy of Mu- 
sic, Roseland, Itzit, New Glasgow ; Jubilee, Stel- 
larton ; Crescent, Westville; Scotia, Trenton. 

Montreal— H. B. Miller: Canada, Model Pal 
ace, Queen's Victoria. Independent Amusement 
Co. : Strand, Regent, Moulin Rouge. A. St. 
Germain: Crystal Palace, Family, Mount Royal. 
A. Lawand : Maisonneuve, Laurier Palace. N. 
Lawand: Maple Leaf, Dominion. N. Lazarus: 
Lord Nelson, Napoleon, Alhambra. H. B. Miller: 
Model Palace, Canada. Victoria. Berzansky : 
North Star, Lux Palace. Boulevard. 

Lawland Bros. : 5 houses, headquarters King 
Edward. Montreal. _ 

D. Wolfe : 2 houses, headfuarters \ edun Pal- 
ace, Montreal. E. Berzansky : 2 houses, head- 
quarters North Star, Montreal. Strand Amuse- 
ments : 3 houses, headquarters Strand, Montreal. 

Quebec — Joe Bedard : Crystal, Princess. 

Renfrew — Ottawa Valley Amuse. Co. : Princess, 
Smith Falls; Orpheum, Almonte; New Casino, 
Arnprior; O'Brien, Renfrew: Grand, Pembroke. 

St. John— F. G. Spencer: Lyric and Unique, 
St. John ; Opera House, Fredericton ; Vogue, 
Woodstock ; Opera House, Athol ; Opera House, 
Imperial, Campbellton ; Opera House, Dalhousie ; 
Empress, Gem, Amherst; Princess, Strand, Truro; 
Prince Edward, Strand, Charlottetown. 

Sarnia — United Theaters, Lt. : Imperial, Cres- 
cent and Princess, Sarnia. 

•Sydney — E. R. Lynn : Casino and three theaters 
in the Maritime Provinces. 

Sydney Mines — W. H. Cuzner: Strand and two 
theaters in the Maritime Provinces. 

Toronto — Allen Enterprises : Allen. Allen's 
Bloor, Allen's Beaver, Allen's Royal. Allen's St. 
Clair, Allen's Parkdale, Allen's Danforth. Toronto ; 
Temple, Hamilton; Majestic and Allen, London; 
Allen and Roma, Kitchener; Windsor. Windsor; 
Allen, Coburg; Allen's Regent, Ottawa: Allen, 
Brandon ; Allen, Calgary ; Allen and Monarch, 
Edmonton ; Allen, Moose Jaw ; Allen and Rex, 
Regina ; Dominion, Rex. and Allen. Winnipeg! 
Lyric, Swift Current; Allen, New Grand and 
Maissoneuve (also one under construction) Mon- 
treal : Auditorium and Allen's Olympia, Quebec. 

Allen Theater Enterprises : Allen's Beach, 
Allen's College, Christie. Colonial ; Gaiety, 
Bijou. Winnipeg ; Rex. Globe, Vancouver : Royal 
Victoria. Victoria ; Allen's Russel. Ottawa ; Allen, 
London: Bijou. Calgary; Imperial. Edmonton; 
Rose, Regina ; Allen. Peterboro ; Lyric, Swift Cur- 
rent ; Allen, Brantford ; Allen's Lyric. Cobalt ; 
Imperial. Kitchener. New theaters under con- 
struction in the following cities: Detroit. Cleve- 
land. Montreal, Vancouver, Halifax, Windsor. 
St. Catherines (open), Sault Ste. Marie. 

Griffin Amuse. Enter.: Operate 17 houses in 
Ontario outside of Toronto. Main office in 
Toronto. Paramount Theaters, Ltd. : Regent, 
Strand, Alhambra, Garden, Teck, Family ; Strand, 
Ottawa; Strand, Kingston; Regent, Gait; Regent. 
Guelph ; Savoy, Hamilton ; one in Port Hope 
and one in Oshawa. 

Alexander, Lester and Mentol : Operate Park 
and Doric. 

Vancouver — W. P. Nichols: Columbia. Van- 
couver. Houses in Victoria, New Westminster, 
Naimo, North Vancouver and Prince Albert. 
United Theaters, Ltd.: Operate in Vancouver, Vic- 
toria, New Westminster and Naimo. 

Winnipeg — F. R. Hyde: Crescent, Wonderland. 
A. R. McNichoI: Lyceum. Starland 

Allardt Circuit operates three small houses in 
Winnipeg. 

Connecticut 

Bridgeport — Walder Bros. & Nussenfeld: Hip- 
podrome ; Bristol, Bristol. 

Bristol — Lewis Brown: Princess; Palace. Rock 
ville; Orpheum, Danielson. 



193 



LIONEL BARRYMORE 



WHITMAN BENNETT 



KENNETH WEBB 



WHITMAN BENNETT STUDIOS 

YONKERS. NEW YORK 



194 



Lakeville — A. F. Roberts: Robert's Hall; Town 
Hall, Lime Rock. E. J. Stewart: Best and Town 
Hall, Canaan. 

Naugatuck — A. B. C. Theater Co. : Rialto. See 
Pk I n. s sschusc t ts 

New Haven— Alfred S. Black : Rialto. See 
Maine. 

Nathan H. Gordon and William P. Gray : 
Olympia. See Massachusetts. 

S. Z. Poli : Bijou, Palace, Hyperion; Poli's, 
Strand and Garden, Waterbury ; Poli's, Palace, 
Grand, Hartford; Poli's, Plaza and Lyric, Bridge- 
port; Poli's and Life, Meriden. 

South Norwalk — A. J. Collins : Palace and Em- 
press, Danbury. 

Stamford — Mrs. Charles D. Vuono : StranJ, 
Opera House and Arcade. 

Taftville — A. Benoit : Hillcrest ; Lily, Plainfield ; 
Best, Moosup; Atwood's Hall, Wauregan. 

Waterbury — Waterbury Theater Co., subsid- 
iary of interests operating Strand, New York. 

Delaware 

Wilmington — J. Ginns : several houses. 

District of Columbia 

Washington, D. C- — Brylawski : Palace, Cosmos 
and Happyland. 

Harry M. Crandall : Metropolitan, Knicker- 
bocker, Savoy, Avenue Grand, Apollo, York, 
Washington : Strand, Cumberland, Md. ; National. 
Roanoke. Va.j Century, Petersburg; Apollo, Mar- 
tinsburg. W. Va. 

Tom Moore: Rialto, Capitol, Parkway, Strand, 
Garden. Washington. 

Florida 

Jacksonville — I.. .1. Joel: operates 4. 
Tampa — Strand Amuse. Co. : Bonita, Strand 
and Victory. 

Ybor City — Ybor City Theater Co. : operates 3. 

Georgia 

Athens —J, B. Joel: Strand ami Kite. Athens; 
Strand, Elberton. 

Atlanta- Southern Enterprises: 8X houses; 
operate in Anniston. Gadsden, Birmingham, Tus- 
caloosa. Montgomery, Florence and Sheffield, 
Ala. ; Jacksonville, Orlando, St. Augustine, St. 
Petersburg and Tampa, Fla. ; Atlanta, Augusta, 
Columbus. Griffin, Gainesville and Marietta, Ga. ; 
Spartanburg. Columbia, Anderson, Greenwood 
and Greenville, S. C. ; Asheville and Charlotte, N. 
C. ; Memphis, Dyersburg, Jackson and Morris- 
town, Tenn. (also controlling Signal Amuse. Co. 
chain. See Tenn.). 

M. A. Lightman operating 2. 

Sig Samuels : Criterion, Savoy, Metropolitan 
and Alpha. 

Bainbridge — Walter J. Brackin : Callahan, Bain- 
bridge; Brackin, Cairo. 

Buford — A. M. Aiken: Colonial, Buford; 
Colonial, Commerce. 

Cordele — John Cain, Jr.: Palace, Cordele; 
Palace, Douglas. 

Cuthbert — E. Lee : Vaudette, Cuthbert ; Vaudet- 
te.Eufaula, Ala. ; Vaudette. Carabella, Fla. 

Dalton— Manning & Wink : Crescent, Dalton ; 
Gem, Calhoun; Strand, Athens Tenn.; Gem, 
Etowah Tenn. 

Macon — Macon Photo-Play Theaters Co. : 
Princess, Capitol, Palace and Grand, Macon. 

Pelham — H. M. Mitchell: Dixie, Pelham ; Pal- 
ace, Dawson ; Cozy, Florala. 

Rome — O. C. Learn: Elite and Amusu, Rome. 

Savannah — Savannah Photoplays Theaters Co. : 
Arcadia and Star. American Theaters Corp. 
'Arthur Lucas): Odeon and Folly, also building 
one ; Lyric, Sumter, S. C. ; building one in 
Americus, Ga. 

Abe S. Guckenheimer : Arcadia and Star, 
Savannah ; Grand, Waynesboro. American Thea- 
ters Co.: Odeon and Folly, Savannah. W. J. 
Stiles: Pekin, Savannah; Pekin Athens; Pekin, 
Brunswick (all colored). 

Tallapoosa— Fred Head : Amusu, Tallapoosa ; 
Head, Bremen. 

Thomasville F H. Smith; Grand. Thomas- 
ville; Strand, Tifton ; Opera House, Quitman; 
Rex, and Alamo. Yaldosta. 



Tocca — Burton & Teague : Star, Tocca ; Star, 
Lavonia; Star, Seneca; Chamblee ; Star, Roy- 
ston; Star, Hartwell. 

Waycross — W. L. Brandenburg: Orpheum and 
Kozy, Waycross. 

Colorado 

Colorado Springs — George H. Greaves : Prin- 
cess ; to build another. 

Denver — Moore and Greaves Amusement Co. : 
Princess, Queen and Rialto, Denver ; Rialto, Pueb- 
lo ; Sterling, Greeley ; Princess, Colorado Springs ; 
Lyric, Princess, Cheyenne, Wyo. William Fox : 
Isis, Rivoli, Strand and Plaza. Bishop Cass Co. : 
American, and with Goldwyn owns Tabor Grand. 

Fort Collins — M. C. Gerhart : Empress and 
Lyric. 

Ft. Morgan — N. G. Brewer: U. S. A.; U. S. A. 
at Sidney, Neb. ; Lyric, Sterling. 

La Veta— W. 1. Berrv : Crystal, Picture Show, 

Ojo. 

Pueblo — Swanson and Nolan : Grand ; Majestic, 
Grand Junction ; Rex, Greeley. 

Trinidad -Kohn & Fairchild Amusement Co.: 
West. Rialto, Trinidad: Curran, Boulder; Coro- 
nado, Mutual, Duncan O. H., Los Vegas, N. M. 

Idaho 

Blackfoot -Orpheum, Isis. 

Boise — Majestic Amusement Co., B. W. Bick- 
ert : Empress, Strand, Majestic, Boise; Orpheum, 
Majestic, Nampa; New, Caldwell; New, Ontario; 
Majestic, Benley. 

Kimberly — Garl Ridgway : Star, Kimberly ; 
Star, Hazelton; Star, Hansen. 

Param — N. E. Leigh: Liberty, Parma; Lib- 
erty, Nysa. 

Pocatello — Carrothers & Archibald : Orpheum, 
Princess. 

Preston — George Paull : Isis, Opera House, 
Dayton; Opera House. Whitney. 

Twin Falls — A. R. Anderson: Orpheum, Gem. 

Illinois 

Areola I- S. Ouirk : Olympia, Areola; Strand, 
Tuscola. 

Carbondale — A. W. Barth: Yale, Carbondale; 
Maine, Anna. 

Chicago — Schoenstadt & Sons : Boulevard, At- 
lantic, Archer, Halfied, Little Ashland, Verdi 
and Brighton Park. 

Marks & Goodman : Broadway Strand, Tiling- 
ton, Marshall Square, Marshfield and Orpheus. 

Jones, Linick & Schaefer : McVicker's, Rialto, 
Lyric, Orpheum, Randolph and Bijou Dream. 

Gumbiner Bros : Bertha, DeLuxe, Star, 
Paulina, New Regent, Bell, DeLuxe, Orpheum, 
Hamilton. Parkside and Villas. 

Balaban & Katz : Control Park, Rivera, Wal- 
lace, Circle, Ambassador and Tivoli. 

Ascher Bros. : Chateau, Terminal, Rosewood, 
Adelphi. Milford, Calo. Lane Court, Oakland 
Square. Metropolitan, Kenwood, Frolic, Cosmo- 
politan, Columbus, West Engelwood, Forest 
Park, Crown, Peerless, Commercial ; Midway 
Rockford ; Dayton, Dayton Ohio ; Cincinnati, 
Cincinnati Ohic; Merrill, Wilwuv ee Wis. 
Vitagraph, Pershing, Michigan, Wilson, West 

Lubiner & Trinz : Crawford, Covent Garden, 
Paramount, Lakeside. Knickerbocker, Biograph, 
Vitagraph, Pershing, Michigan, Wilson, West 
End, Ellantee, Oak Park, Pantheon, Madison 
Square. 

Fitzpatrick McElroy Co. : Rex and Vau- 
dette. Three Rivers. Mich. ; Cladwell, St. Jo- 
seph ; Bell, Princess and Bijou, Brenton Har- 
bor; Colonial, Big Rapids: Lyric and Dreamland, 
Cadillac; Lyric and Dreamland, Travers City; 
Lyric, Manistee; Lyric, Ludington ; Maltz and 
Lyric, Alpena; Grand and Lyric, Blue Island, 
111. ; Strand, Bijou and Marinette, Marinette, Wis. 

Du Quoin — A combination booking proposition 
headed by Reed and Yemm of Du Quoin, taking 
in the following towns : Du Quoin, Christopher, 
Sesser, West Frankfort, Salem, Mt. Vernon and 
Beton, all in Illinois. 

Eldorado — Colonial Amusement Co. : Grand 
and Orpheum, Harrisburg ; Grand and Casino, 
Eldorado. 

Granite City — Lillian Amuse. Co. : Washington, 
Rialto and Garden. 

Harrisburg- Orpheum Amuse. Co.: 2 in Har- 
risburg and 2 in Eldorado. 



East St. Louis — Joseph Erber : Erber's, East 
St. Louis; Washington, Belleville; Strand, Col- 
linsville. 

Herrin— John Marlow : Hippodrome, Herrin ; 
Hippodrome, Murphysboro. 

Mattoon— B. F. Uran : Grand and "K," Mattoon. 

Newman — T. B. Mathews : Illinois, Newman ; 
Pastime. Kansas. 

Oconto — A. L. Robarge: Gem; Grand, Merril; 
Lyric and Majestic, Wausau. 

Ottawa — Clarence Hartford : Star and Ruby- 
Palace. 

Panama, 111. — J. D. Williams: Grand; also 
house in Hillsboro. 

Paxton — Alcru Theater Co. : 
ton, and Royal, Minonk. 

Springfield — W. W. Watts : 



I. 



Scenic, Blooming- 
Gaiety. Princess. 



yric. 



Indiana 

Exhibitors 



Productions Corp. : 
Gayety, and Lenwood, Indian- 
House, Grand, Crystal, Bedford; 
Alhambra, Orleans; Washington, 



Bedford- United 
Rialto, Broadway, 
apolis ; Opera 
Opera House, 
Salem. 

Brazil — Brazil Theater Co. 

Clinton — J. B. Stine ; Gem, Clinton; Swan and 
Victory, Terre Haute. 

Crawfordsville — Strand Theater Co. : Strand 
and Sipe at Kokomo ; plans to take over other 
houses in larger Indiana cities. 

Evansville — Standard Amuse. Co. 

Indianapolis — Central Amusement Co. : Lyric, 
Isis and Alhambra. 

United Exhibitors' Productions : Rialto, Broad- 
way, Gayety and Lenwood. Six other houses in 
the southern part of the state have been acquired 
and the company plans to build and buy more. 

Renwood Amuse. Co. : Rialto, Indianapolis. 
Ray Bair : Southside. Al Zaring : North Star. 

Central Amuse. Co. : Lyric, Isis and Alham- 
bra. Sourbier Amuse. Co., Keystone and Palms. 
Olson-Sourbier Enter.: Rivoli, Indianapolis; Rivo- 
li, Toledo. 

Kokomo — Kokomo Grand Theater Co.: Isis and 
Grand, Kokomo. 

Lafayette — Luna Amuse. Co. : Luna, Family 
(will control Family after Feb. 1), Lafayette; also 
theaters in Ft. Wayne and Kankakee. 

Lafayette — Hornbeck Amuse. Co. 

Logansport — E. L. McDermott: Grand and 
Ark. 

Marion — Marion Theater Co. : Luna, Marion 
and Lyric. 

Peru — Loomis Realty Co.: operate 4: building 1. 

Shelbyville — F. J. Rembusch : Alhambra, Shel- 
byville; American, Columbus; Grace Maxine, Mar- 
tinsville; Ohio, Gem, Manhattan, Indianapolis, and 
will add 5 more. 

Vincennes — Wilkerson-Lyons Enterprises: Lyric, 
Pantheon, Rialto, Princess and Alice. 

Wabash — Dickson Bros. : Eagle and Harter's 
Opera House. 

Iowa 

Ames — W. A. Matlack : Princess. To build 
another. 

Boone — George B. Flint: Virginia. To build 
another. 

Cedar Rapids — A. J. Diebold: Strand, Palace, 
Cedar Rapids ; Strand, Waterloo ; Palace, Vinton. 

Council Bluffs— Strand Theater Co. 

Des Moines — Keller Moreland, Moreland Amuse- 
ment Co.: Rex, Auburn, Neb.; Lyric, Osceola; 
Liberty, Nebraska City, Neb. ; Royal, Onawa, la. ; 
Majestic, Missouri Valley, la.; Moreland, Platts- 
mouth, Neb. Adams Theater Co. : Empress, Des 
Moines ; Garden, Waterloo ; Empress, Shenandoah ; 
King, Albia; Orpheum, Fairfield; Willard, Cres- 
ton ; Garden, Marion ; Auditorium, Mt. Pleasant ; 
Rialto, Newton ; Empress, Indianola; Irving, Car- 
roll; Lincoln, Chariton; Olympic, Knoxville ; Idle 
Hour, Leon ; Graham, Washington. 

Adams Theater Co. : Circle Amuse. Co. : Circle. 

Dubuque — John Maclay: Grand, Strand, Du- 
buque. 

Marshalltown — J. E. Hostettler; Casino, Mar- 
shalltown ; Royal, Sioux City ; Gem, Charles City ; 
Rialto and Lyric, Lincoln, Neb. ; Vrystal and 
Plaza, Waterloo; Isis, Cedar Rapids; Strand, 

Hastings, Neb. 

Sioux City — Scenic Amuse. Co. 



Kansas 

Galena — N. W. Huston: Palace; also oper- 
ates houses at Columbus and Pittsburg 

Holton— S. H. Blair: Perkins, Holton ; \ ic- 
tory, Hiawatha; Majestic Belleville , - 

Hutchinson— M. B. Shanberg : Midland Hutch- 
inson ; Columbia, Junction City; Palace, Sahna. 

Kansas City— Greubel Bros. : Electric, Spring- 
field, Mo.; Electric, Joplin, Mo.; Tenth St., 
Kansas City; Electric, Kansas City; Electric, St. 

J °Kttsb^g— Bess & Klock: Klock Mystic. 
Grand, Pittsburg; Liberty, Picher, Picher Okla. 

lop.ka— O. L. Hopper: Orpheum. Building 
another. , , , _ . ... 

Wichita— Arthur Ford: .Maple. To build an- 
other. 

Kentucky 

Bowling Green— Tony Sudekum : Princess, 
Bowling Green Princess; Hopkinsville. 

Crescent Amuse. Co.: Also operates in Hop- 
kinsville. , ... 

Dawson Springs— E. W. Dozier and F. M. Hole- 
man control four local houses. 

Lexington — Phoenix Amusement Co. : Strand, 
Ben Ali; Alhambra, Richmond; Capitol, 1- rank- 
fort ; Colonial, Winchester. 

Osage City — William Coding. 

Owensboro.— George A. Bleich Enterprises: 
Empress and Queen. 

Paducah, Leo Keiler : Cozy, Arcade and Star, 
Paducah; Savoy, Princeton; Princess, Henderson. 

Strand Theater Co.: 4 in Paducah; 2 m May- 
field ; 1 in Princeton. 

Louisiana 

Baton Rouge — Louisiana Amuse. Co. 
Homer — Slack Amuse. Co. 
Monroe — Layton & Holden. 

New Orleans— J. J. Shimkowitz : Queen and 
Trymore, Mobile. . 

Sobel-Richards— Shear Enterprises: Washing- 
ton, Carollton, Fine Arts, Arcade and Rivoli. 
Latter two opened by Victor Howard, are run in 
conjunction with the others. 

Saenger Amusement Company, operating the- 
aters in the following towns: Baton Rouge, 
Ruston, Donaldsonville, Thibodaux, Franklin, 
Eunice, Jennings, Crowley, Lafayette, Homer, 
Lake Charles, Minden, Morgan City, Houma, Nat- 
chitoches, Alexandria, New Iberia, Monroe, 
Plaquemine. New Orleans and Shreveport. 

Shreveport — Liberty Amuse. Co., Chas F. 
Gordon. 

Maine 

Augusta — Nathan H. Gordon & William P. 
Gray: In Maine: Colonial and Opera House, Au- 
gusta ; Pastime and Cumberland, Brunswick ; 
Strand, Opera House and Coliseum, Gardiner; 
Empire, Strand, Music Hall and Mystic, Lewis- 
ton ; Dreamland, Livermore Falls ; Rex, Norway ; 
Opera House and Majestic, Rumford; Savoy, 
South Paris; Bijou, Wilton. In N. H. : Albert 
and Princess, Berlin ; Colonial, Olympia, Scenic 
and Portsmouth, Portsmouth ; Opera House, Gor- 
ham ; Majestic, Burlington. 

Bangor— Charles Stern: Graphic, Bangor; 
Park, Dexter; Chic, Milo; Star, Dover. 

Bethel — Bragdon's Circuit : Odeon Hall, Bethel ; 
Hall, Oxford; Perkin's Hall, Mechanic's Falls. 

Brownfield— R. C. Flint Circuit: Town Hall, 
Brownfield; K. of P. Hall, Fryeburg; Hall, Den- 
mark; K. of P. Hall, Hiram; Wiley's Hall, Lov- 
ell ; Town Hall, Cornish ; Stanley, Keezar Falls. 

Eastport — Wilbur A. Shea: St. Croix Opera 
House, Calais; Acme and Toy, Eastport; Eagle, 
Lubec. 

Libson Falls — H. E. Gustin : Bijou, Libson 
Falls ; Empress, Libson. 

Portland — Abraham Goodside : Empire, Jeffer- 
son, Portland; Capitol, Springfield; Capitol, Man- 
chester. 

Richmond — J. A. O'Brien: Opera House, Rich- 
mond ; Your and Strand, South Berwick. 

Rockland— Alfred S. Black Circuit : In Maine ; 
Banger Opera House, Bangor; Bath Opera 
House, Liberty, Columbia and Arcade, Bath ; Star 
and Scenic, Westbrook ; Haines, Waterville ; Cen- 
tral, Biddeford ; Park. Empire and Arcade, Rock- 



197 



W. O'HAGEN HURST 

Studio Manager 



WHITMAN BENNETT STUDIOS 

Yonkers, New York 



Formerly Producer of Paramount Pictograph, 
Paramount-Bray, and Paramount Magazine; also 



PRODUCTION MANAGER 
NON FICTION FILM DEPARTMENT 
FAMOUS PLAYERS— LASKY CORP. 



198 



land; Colonial and Ojnra House, Belfast; Union 
Hall, Brooks; Lincoln Hall, Damariscotta , 
Black's, Portland, Star, Waldoboro. In N. H.: 
Strand. Dover. In Vt. : Strand, Rutland ; Strand, 
Randolph; B ijou, Barre ; Auditorium and Princess, 
Brattleooro; Black's, Fair Haven; Opera House, 
Putney; Black's, Bethel; Bijou, Morrisville ; 
Black's, Ricliford; Hammond, Ludlow; Opera 
House, Stowc; Park and Opera House, Barre; 
slack's, Northtield. In Mass.: Merrimack Square 
and Jewell, Lowell; Quincy, Quincy; Broadway, 
' helsea; Kialto, Lawrence; Waldorf, Lynn; Rox- 
bury, Boston. In R. I.: Bliven Opera House, 
Westerly. In Conn.: Rialto, New Haven; Opera 
House, Willimantic. In N. Y. : Park, Utica. 

Also identified with Black Circuit are: Black 
and ,->pitz controlling: Empire, New Hedford and 
Empire, Taunton, Mass.; Strand, Pawtucket ; and 
Strand, Arctic, and Laurier, Woonsocket, R. I. 
Black & Rhodenizer controlling: Hyde Park, 
Hyde Park, Mass.; and Rockland, Rockland, Me.; 
Star, Concord, A. H. Black & Churchill con- 
trolling, temple, Houlton ; Park, Fort Fairfield; 
Black s, Fort Kent, -Me. 

Maryland 

Baltimore Stanley L-o. of America interested in 

Victor. a. 

bred U. Nixon-Nirdlingers Academy of Music, 
Victoria, Baltimore; Maryland, Colonial, Acad- 
emy, Hagerstown; Opera House, Temple, Dover, 
Del. 

Century Amuse. Co. (C. E. Whitehurst) : New, 
Garden, Parkway, Peabody, Baltimore. 

Bernard Depkin, Jr.: Wizard (for Para- 
mount), Strand, Victory McHenry, New Pick- 
wick (for N. Nirdlinger) ; Forest ( for Ford). E. 
B. McCurdy: Lafayette and Eureka. 

Cumberland — Charoukas: Liberty, Cumberland. 

Massachusetts 

Beverly — Ware Bros : Larcom and Regent ; 
Strand, Peabody. 

Boston — A. B. C. Theater Co., Olympic and 
Roxbury ; Strand, Pittsfield; Rialto at Naugatuck, 
Conn. 

B. F. Keith: Keith's, Boston and Keith's Bijou 
Dream ; Keith's at Lowell. See New York. 

Elm Amusement Co. : Magnet ; Opera House at 
Milrod; Marlboro at Marlboro; Sharkey's, North 
Attleboro, Opheum Canton. 

Marcus Loew ; Loew's Orpheum, Loew's Globe, 
l.oew's Columbia, and Loew's State. See New 
York. 

Nathan H. Gordon : Washington Street Olym- 
pia, Scollay Square Olynlpia, Upham's Cor- 
ner Strand ; Gordon's Central Square, Cambridge ; 
Harvard, North Cambridge; Gordon's Olympia, 
Chelsea ; North Shore and Olympia, Gloucester ; 
Gordon's Olympia, Lynn ; Olympia, New Bed- 
ford ; Park and Family, Worcester; Olympia, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Ernest H. Horstmann : Olympia, Worcester; 
Princess and Wakefield, Wakefield j Park and 
Lyric, Middleboro ; Olympia, Reading; Webster, 
Franklin, N. H. 

Fall River — Max Mitchel interests: Bijou, Em- 
pire, Rialto and Aecademy ; Owl, Lowell, Strand 
and Premier, Newburyport ; Central, Waltham, 
Crown, Amesbury. 

Framingham — George Giles: St. George, 
Gorman's, Princess: St. James, Boston; Gardner 
and Orpheum, Gardner ; Waltham and Rex, Walt- 
ham ; Stoneham, Stoneham. 

Lynn — Moe Mark: Strand and Comique ; Strand 
and Crystal at Worcester. See New York. 

Northbridge — Walker Circuit; Walker's Hall; 
Town Hall, Uxbridge; Pospect, Whitinsville ; 
Jacques Hall, Farnumsville ; Hall, Linwood. 

Somerville — R. W. Brown: Union Square 
Olympia, Day St., Olympia, Somerville; Opera 
House, Newton; Olympia, Everett. 

Springfield — Goldstein Brothers Amusement Co.: 
Broadway and Plaza; Plaza, Northampton; Strand 
and Opera House, Westfield; Colonial, Pittsfield, 
Casino, Hampton Beach, N. H. 

Win. Fox : Fox's; Fox's at New Britain. See 
New York. 

Webster- Steinberg Circuit: Steinberg's and 

-Music Hall; Opera House, Athol. 



Winchendon — Carter's Circuit: Monadnock; 
.Monadnock, Troy, N. H. 

Worcester— S. Z. Poli : Poli's, Palace and 
Grand, Poli's and Palace Springfield. Princess 
Theater Co. : Olympia, Worcester. Princess, 
Wakefield, Wakefield; Park, Middleboro. 

Michigan 

Battle Creek- -Lipp & Crosse Co.: Regent, 
Strand, Post. 

Detroit — C. H Miles: Majestic, Orpheum, Re- 
gent, Miles. 

D. W. Muns, B. R Williams and H. E. Ap- 
plegate: Palace; to build l.a Salle. 

J. H. Kunskj. Inc.: Madison. Adams, DeLuxe, 
Alhambra, Linwood La Salle, Garden, Liberty, 
Columbia, Empress, Royal Detroit. 

Warren & Cohen : Woodward Theater Co. 

Flint — Butterfield Circuit: Majestic, Ann Ar- 
bor; Bijou. Bay City; Fran'din and Regent, Sag- 
inaw; Bijou, Battle Creek; Bijou, Jackson; Ma- 
jestic, Regent, Kalamazoo; Bijou and Colonial, 
Lansing; Palace, Regent, Garden and Majestic, 
Flint. 

Grand Rapids -Consolidated Theaters. Inc.: 
Orpheum, Majestic, Strand and Idle Hour. Beech- 
ers, Inc.: Alcazar. Burton Heights. Colonial, 
Cherry St., Crestonette and Division. 

Hancock -Win. Vance. 

Iron River — Iron River Theater Co.: Cozy and 
Empire. 

Jackson — W. S. McLaren: Majestic. Colonial 
and Dawn. 

Marquette — Delft and Opera House; New 
Strand and Delft. Escanaba; Delft, Munising. 

Marshall — V. B. Valleau, Inc.: Albert Lea, 
Blue Earth and Marshall. 

Muskegon — Paul J. Schlossman to build here 
and in Muskegon Heights. 

P. J. Schlossman : Majestic, Rialto, Regent 
and Elite. 

Negaunee — Negaunee Amuse. Co. : Liberty and 

Star. 

Newport — A. L. Picker: Newport, Newport; 
Rex and Rialto, Ironwood; Hurley, Hurley, Wis. 

Minnesota 

Baudette — Northern Theater Co. : 

Cass Lake — Chas. Perrizo : In Cass Lake and 

Duluth — Clinton Amuse Co.: Duluth Theater Co. 

Graceville — J. L. Hasbrouck : In Graceville, 
Ortonville and Wheaton. 

International Falls — Grand Theater Co. 

Mankato — Dan Chamberlain (American Amuse. 
Co.): In Mankato, Faribault, Minn; Fargo, N. D. ; 
Surburban House in Minneapolis. 

Minneapolis — Twin City Amuse. Trust Estate. 
Garrick and others. United Theaters, Inc. : Ply- 
mouth and others. 

New Lake — H. P. Greene (Mgr. Lake Amuse. 
Co.): New Lake, Lake; Minneapolis Hamline ; 
St. Paul 4 theaters. 

Pine City — H. N. Turner. 

Stillwater — Frank Nemec : (Mgr. United The- 
aters of America). In Stillwater and St. Cloud. 
Virginia — W. J. Rezac : Virginia and Hibbing. 
Winona — Colonial Amuse. Co. : 

Missouri 

Cape Girardeau — Park Amusement Co.: Park, 
Pullman, Chaffee, Cape Girardeau; Circle, Jack 

son. 

Kansas City — Frank L. Newman : Newman, 
Royal, Regent and 12th St. 

Joe Cooper: Cooper, Oklahoma City; Wichita, 
Wichita. 

M. A. Shanberg: Palace, Saline; Royal, Hutch- 
inson ; Columbia, Junction City. 

Nevada — Thomas Haggard: Sar and Photoplay. 

Poplar Bluff — I. W. Rogers: Criterion, Lib- 
erty, Carruthersville. 

St. Joseph — Nate Block Amusement Co. : Colo- 
nial, Orpheum, Royal, St. Joseph; Orpheum, At- 
chison, Kan. 

St. Louis— Skouras Bros. : Pageant. Arsenal, 
..ew Grand Central, Old Central. VVest End Lyric, 
Lyric, Shaw, Down Town, Olympic. 



199 



T. L. GRIFFITH 

Chief Cinematographer, Whitman 
Bennett Productions 



Photographing Lionel Barrymore 
and Specials 



200 



Famous Players-Missouri Corp. : Pershing, 
Kings, Shenandoah, Juanita, Grand Florrissant, 
Lindell, Lafayette, Montgomery, Arco, Lowell, 
Melba, Cherokee, Gravois, Royal, Novelty and 
Maffit. 

Joe Mogler: Bremen and Mogler. 
Eugene Freund : Cinderella and Woodland. 
Frank Root: Peerless, Eagle and Broadway- 
Family. 

John K^rzin: Olympia, Casino, Majestic and 
Star. 

Montana 

Billings— A. H. West: Babcock, Wesfs 27th 
St., Billings. 

Bozeman — O. E. Schmidt: Ellen, Gem, Lyric, 
Bozeman. 

Butte — Ansonia Amusement Co. : Broadway, 
Ansonia, Orpheum, Butte; Marlow, Helena. 

Fred Teufel (Jensen Von Herberg interests) : 
Rialto, Butte. 

Great Falls — W. Waldo Freeman : Imperial, 
Palace, Gem, Great Falls. Wm. Steege : Grand, 
Sexton, Great Falls. 

Kalispell — Striker & McDaniel : Princess, Or- 
pheum, Kalispell. 

Libby — W. F. Kienitz : Kootenai, Libby ; Prin- 
cess, Troy. 

Manhattan — S. L. Young: Kid No. 1, Man- 
hattan; Kid No. 2, Willow Creek; Kid No. 3, 
Trident. 

Missoula — Northwest Theaters, Inc. (Simons 
& Turner) : Empress, Liberty, Isis and Bijou,. 
Missoula; Liberty and Grand, Wallace, Idaho; 
Liberty, Mullen, la.; Liberty and Princess, Kel- 
logg, Ida. ; Liberty, Couer d'Alene, Idaho. 

Ryegate — G. F. Rediske: Star, Ryegate ; Star, 
Clayton. 

Nebraska 

Central City— E. C. Preston Theater Co. : House 
here and at Holdrege. 

Culberson — Benkelman Circuit : Opera House, 
Culberson; Opera House, Benkelman; Opera 
House, Imperial; Opera House, Palisade; Opera 
House, Trenton; Opera House, Gilberson. 

Minden — Binderup Circuit. 

Omaha — George Munroe : Odell Opera House ; 
Rogers Opera House, De Witt ; Jewell, Gilbert 
and Lyric, Beatrice. 

A. H. Blank: Rialto and Strand, Omaha; 
Garden, Casino and Family, Davenport, la. ; Des 
Moines, Rialto, Casino, Garden, Unique, Palace 
and Majestic, Des Moines, Iowa; Swan and North, 
Columbus, Neb. ; Regent, Palace and Bijou, Mason 
City, la.; Princess, Sioux City, la.; Strand, Mar- 
shalltown, la. ; Rialto, Boone, la. (in course of 
construction) : Happy Hour, Princess, Ames, la. 

World Realty Co. : Sun, Moon, Muse and 
Princess, Omaha. 

Hostetter Bros. : Orpheum and Family in Clin- 
ton. 

Pawnee City — King's Amusements : Houses in 
Pawnee, Lewiston, Du Bois, Neb. and Barn, 
Kans. 

Nevada 

Reno — Hurst Bros. : Rialto and Grand. 
Tonopah — J. E. Smith : Butler and others. 

New Jersey 

Atlantic City — Stanley Co. of America: Cen- 
tral, City Square, Colonial, Cort, Criterion, Globe, 
Virginia, Steel Pier, Keith's Garden Pier; Pal- 
ace, Gloucester ; Broad, Pennsgrove ; State St. ; 
Trenton ; Towers, Broadway, Temple, Colonial, 
Forest Hill, Garden, Grand, Lyric, Plaza and 
Princess, Camden ; Auditorium, Burlington. See 
Philadelphia. 

E. J. O'Keefe: 2; J. Haffner. 2. 

Camden — A. J. Rovner : 3. B. Schindler : 2. 

Haddonfield — N. Johnson: 3. 

Passaic — Jacob Fabian : Montauk and Play- 
house. 

Perth Amboy — A. J. Sabo: Ditmas ; Clinton 
Square, Newark. 

Trenton — Hildinger : several, M. Moses : 2. 
W. J. Vernon: 2. 

Union Hill — Louis F. Blumenthal and Charles 
Haring: Lincoln; Blumenthal owns National, 
Jersey City, and with Haring will build in West 
New York and Jersey City. 



New Hampshire . ., non . 

Lebanon-H. A. Graves: Lyric, Lebanon, 
Globe, St. Johnsbury circuit ■ Star, White- 

New York 

Aubum-M. A. Shea: Jefferson, Auburn; Op- 
era House, Jamestown. w~;iv md 

Batavia— Nikitas T. Dipson : Family and 
Garden, Richmond Hill, L. I- Xerry 

Buffalo— General Theaters Corp.. Ellen ierry, 
Allendale, Arcadia, Marlowe, Buffalo. 

United Theatrical Enterprises: Colonial, 
lumbia, Central Park, Prem.er, Buffalo; Cata- 
ract, Niagara Falls. 

Hale & Hanney: Maxine and 'Capitol. 

Malone— Kernato Amusement Co. . Kegent, si. 
Regis Falls; Opera House, Brushton. 

New York City 

Keith-Manhattan-81st St. Harlem Opera 
House. Brooklyn-Prospect, Greenpomt, Mon- 
roe, Madison, Halsey, DeKalk. Jersey City— 

K Proctor- (Book out of Keith office) -Manhat- 
tan-125th St.; 58th St., 23rd St-Albany- 
Harmonus Bleecker Hall, Annex, Bijou Park, 
Troy— Proctor's, Griswald. Schenectady— Proc- 
tor's Mt. Vernon— Proctor's. Youkers— Proc- 
tor's. Elizabeth-Broad St., Jersey St. Plauifield 
—Proctor's. Newark— Palace.' Port Chester— 

Pr Cha 0 rles O'Reilly: 68th St. Playhouse, 68th St. 
and 3rd Ave.; Re*, 211 E. 67th, .St. 

Rachmill, Warschauer and Rinzler: Sheffield, 
308 Sheffield Ave., Penn., 621 Sutter Ave. : Cleve- 
land, 2386 Pitkin Ave., Miller, 251 Saratoga Ave., 
all in Brooklyn. „,„ T , . , 

Maurice Goodman: Willoughby, 260 Knicker- 
bocker Ave. ; Broadway Lyceum, 837 Broadway. 

Robert Riley, Astoria, L. I.: Arena and Ar- 
cade, Astoria; Elite, Sag Harbor; Merian, As- 

t0 william Yoebst— Amphion, 614 Ninth-- Ave.: 
Chelsea, 312 Eihth Ave.; Superior, 443 Third 
Ave., and Royal, 650 Tenth Ave. 

Glynne and Ward— Century, Robinson and 
Nostrand Ave., and Alhambra, Knickerbocker Ave., 
Garden, Richmond Hill, L. I. 

Schwartz and Miller — Oxford, 552 State St. ,< 
and Halsey St., Brooklyn. . | 

Sheer Brothers — Palace, Corona; Victoria, 
Elmhurst; Hyperion, Corona, and Colonial, Co- 

r °Grobe & Noble: U. S., Webster Ave. and 196th 
St. ; Valentine, Fordham Road ; Plaza, Mt. Vernon. 

William Fox Circuit : New York : Academy ' 
of Music, 14th St. and Irvine PI.; Audubon, 165th 
St. and Broadway; City, 114 E. 14th St. ; Cro- 
tona, Tremont and Park Ave.; Nemo, 110th St. 
and Broadway; Star, 107th St. and Lexington 
Ave.; Washington, 149th St. and Amsterdam Ave. 

Brooklyn: Bay Ridge, 72nd and 3rd Ave.; 
Bedford, Bedford Ave. and Bergen St.; Comedy, 
194 Grand St. ; -Folly, 12 Graham Ave.; Ridge' 
wood, Myrtle 'and Cypress Aves. 

Newark, N. J.: American, Clinton and Pe- 
shine Aves. ; Terminal, 84 Park PI. 

Paterson, N. J.: American, 150 Ellison St. 

Jamaica, L. I.: Jamaica, 314 Fulton St. 

Elizabeth, N. J.: Liberty, 1123 Elizabeth Ave. 

St. Louis, Mo. : Liberty, Delmar and Grand 
Aves. 

New Britain, Conn. : New Britain. 

Springfield, Mass. : Springfield, Main St. 
•Denver, Col.: Plaza, Rivoli. Isis and Strand. 

Detroit. Mid'.: Washington. 

Sydney S. Cohen— Empire, McKinley Square, 
Tremont, Bronx Strand. North Star. 

Maier & Schneider — Roebling, Hopkinson, Clin- 
ton Star, Palace, Waco, M. & S. Delancey. 

Consolidated Amuse. Co. — Arena, Times, Ideal, 
Gem. Favorite. York, Village, Movies, Regent, 
Morningsitle, 72nd St. Playhouse, Clermont. 

Chas. Goldreyer — Fordham, University. Con- 
course. 

Bock & Landau — Heights, Classic. 
Brandon & Bradbury — Majectic, Bunny, Olym- 
pia. 

B. K. Rimberg — West End, Standard, Schupler, 
103rd Street Photoplay, Hudson. 



201 



HARRY STRADLING 

CINEMATOGRAPHER 



Lionel Barrymore and Specials with 
Whitman Bennett Productions. 




Weiss Bros. — Fifth Ave., Meeker, Crystal Pal- 
ace, Manhattan, Hendersons (S. I.), Antoinette, 
Alhambra (Stamford, Ct.). 

Wolfe, Hamburger & Springer— 77th St., 
Adelphi, Symphony. 

Leo Brecher — Plaza, Odeon and Orpheum, 
Yonkers. 

H. Goldshien — Joyland, Progress, Atlas. 

R. Grutman — Elorado, Elkwood, Model. 

S. Cuchman — Bronx Golden Rule, King. 

Chas. Steiner — New 14th St., Sunshine, Casino 
Playhouse. 

Al. Harstin — Harlem Sth Ave., Regun. 

Edelhurtz — Hamilton, Oriole & Atlantic(Bk.), 
Metropolis, Colonial — Wonderland (City). 

S. & F. Amuse. Co. — Windsor, Malbourn. 

Mr. Peters — Osceolo, Port Morris. 

Jack Hatton — Marcy, Varities, St. Marks. 

Christmas houses — Adelphi, Norwood, Concord. 
(Bk.). 

Mr. Schwartz — Rialto, Linden, Farragut, High- 
way (Bk.). 

Rubin & Heilbron — Reel, Grand. 

Sam Rhonheimer — Ronly, Globe, Normandy, 
Victoria, New Albany. 

Sol Brill — Sumner and Strand, Far Rockaway. 

Billy Brandt — Carlton, Bunny, Feltman's Air- 
dome. 

Paley — Alpha. (Richmond Hill. Janice), Flushing. 

L. Rosenblatt — Lyceum, Plaza, (Bayonne), 
Star (Brighton). 

S. Vrystal— Strand, W. Hoboken, U. S. Temple, 
Union Hill. N. J. 

Gross & Katz — Golden Rule, Wilson & Rialto, 
Decatur, Bushwick Palace & Echo, Brooklyn. 

Levin Hros. — Playhouse, Mt. Vernon, West- 
cluster. Mt, V., Parkview, Wyckoff (Bk.). 

Loew's : In Greater New York : American, 260 
W. 42nd St. ; Orpheum, 87th and Third Ave. ; 
National, 149th and Bergen Ave.; Metropolitan, 
Fulton and Smith Sts. jj Greeley Square, 30th St. 
and Sixth Ave. ; Delancey St., Delancey and Suf- 
folk ; Victoria, 125th St. and Seventh Ave.; Lin- 
coln Square, 66th St. and Broadway; Fulton, Ful- 
ton and Nostrand; Boulevard, S. Boulevard and 
Westchester ; Theater, New Rochelle, N. Y. ; 
Lyric, Hoboken, N. J.; Avenue B, Ave. B and 
5th St. ; Warwick, Fulton St. and Jerome ; Pal- 
ace, E. N. Y. Ave. and Douglass, Bklyn.; Seventh 
Ave., 124th St. and Seventh Ave.; DeKalb, De- 
Kalb Ave. and Broadway, Bklyn. ; Bijou, Smith 
and Livingston Sts., Bklyn. ; Broadway, Broad- 
way, near Myrtle, Bklyn. ; Burland, 985 Prospect 
Ave.; Circle, 60th St. and Broadway; Forty-Sec- 
ond St., 42nd St. and Lexington Ave. ; New York, 
44th St. and Broadway; 116th St., 116th St. be- 
tween Lenox and 7th Ave. ; Brevoort, Brevoort 
PI. and Bedford Ave., Bklyn.; Rio, 160th St. and 
Broadway; 86th St., 86th St. near Third Ave.; 
Spooner, S. Boulevard and Westechester Ave. ; 
Victory, 156th St. and Third Ave.; Elsmere, Cro- 
tona Parkway and Elsmere PI. 

Throughout the States — Loew's Orpheum, Bos- 
ton, Mass. ; Broadway, Springfield, Mass. ; Empire, 
Fall River, Mass.; Emery, Providence, R. I.; 
Yonge St., Toronto, Can. ; Theatre, Montreal, 
Can.; King St., Hamilton, Ont. ; Hippodrome, 
Baltimore, Md. ; Grand, Atlanta, Ga. ; Bijou, 
Birmingham, Ala. ; Theatre, Knoxville, Tenn. ; Ly- 
ceum, Memphis, Tenn. ; Grand Opera House, 
Shreveport, La. ; Grand Opera House, Alexan- 
dria, La. ; Princess, Meridian, Miss. ; Walnut St., 
Vicksburg, Miss. ; Prince, Houston, Tex. ; Prin- 
cess, San Antonio, Tex. ; Hippodrome, Waco, 
Tex. ; Hippodrome, Dallas, Tex. ; Liberty, Okla- 
homa City, Okla. ; Vendome, Nashville, Tenn. ; 
Garden, Kansas City, Mo. ; Garrick, St. Louis, 
Mo. ; McVickers, Chicago, 111. ; Liberty, Cleve- 
land, O. ; Lyceum, Pittsburg, Pa. ; Dayton, Day- 
ton, O. ; Colonial, Detroit. Mich.; Theatre, Lon- 
don, Can.; Casino, Salt Lake City, Utah; Hippo- 
drome, Portland, Ore. ; Casino, San Francisco ; 
Palace-Hippodrome, Seattle, Wash.; Hippodrome, 
Fresno, Gal. ; Hippodrome, Sacramento, Cal. ; 
Hippodrome, San Jose, Cal.; Hippodrome, Stock- 
ton, Cal. ; Hippodrome, Los Angeles ; Hippo- 
drome, San Diego, Cal. 

In Construction, to be opened in the Fall — 
Ottawa, Can.; Rochester, N. Y. ; Buffalo, N. Y. ; 
State, Cleveland; Park, Cleveland; 45th Street 



(State), New York; Bay Ridge, Brooklyn; Gates 
Avenue, Brooklyn; State, Memphis; Palace, Mem- 
phis- State, Boston; Los Angeles; 83rd Street, 
New York ; New Rochelle ; Newark ; Indianapo- 
lis ; San Francisco; Long Beach, Cal.; Oakland, 
Cal ; Stockton, Cal.; Windsor, Ont.; Toronto, 
Ont.; Euclid Omce Bldg., Cleveland. 

A Rapf— Montauk, Park, Plaza, Bath Beach. 

Mitchell H. Mark Corp.— Mark — Strand in 
Albany, Brooklyn and Buffalo. Booking connec- 
tion with the Moe Mark houses in Lynn and 
Worcester, Mass. Syracuse, N. Y. Spiegel-Mark 
Corp. .owning the Sheridan Square, N. Y., and 
houses in Allentown and Schenectady as well as 
the Spiegel properties in Newark, the Strand and 
New Rialto. , _ , , 

B S. Moss: Regent, 116th St. and 7th Ave.; 
Hamilton, 146th St. and Broadway; Jeffer- 
son, 14th St. and 3rd Ave. ; Flatbush, Flat- 
bush and Church Ave. ; Coliseum, 181st St. and 
Broadway (opens this month). And the following 
under way : Grant, Tremont and Webster Ave. ; 
Atlas, 161st St. and Prospect Ave.; Tivoli, Bklyn. 

Rochester — Regorson Corp. : Regent, Picca- 
dilly and Gordon. To build another. 

Syracuse — Fred A. Fout : Plaza, Geddes, Mid- 
land, Model, Colonial, Syracuse. 

Utica — W. H. Linton: Hippodrome, Utica; 
Hippodrome, Lintonian, Little Falls. 

North Carolina 

Charlotte — R. D. Craver : Broadway and 3 in 
Winston-Salem; 2 in Durham. Otto Hass: Ot- 
toway and Ideal. 

Greensboro — R. G. Hill Enter. : Operate in 
Greensboro, Gaffney, Union and Chester S. C. G. 
W. Pryor: Bijou and others. 

Hamlet — Mr. Henderson: operate 5. 

Henderson — S. S. Stevenson: Liberty and 
others. 

Hickory — J. H. Miller: Hub and others. 
Kenmare— L. G. Darling. 

Lamberton — Anderson Enter. : Pastime, Lamber- 
Raleigh- Aranson & Brown: operate 3. 
Wilmington — Howard Wells Amuse. Co.; 
operate 5. 

Winston-Sakm — Pilot Amuse. Co. : operate 8.. 
ton; Gem, Laurinburg; Opera House, Hamlet. 

Oregon 

Astoria — S. Danz : Star, Liberty, Sunset, As- 
toria. . 

Baker — K. L. Burke: Orpheum, Empire and 
lttiktr B<tkcr 

Bend — O. E. Whittington : Liberty, Grand, Bend. 

Condon — W. B. Sparks: Liberty, Condon; Lib- 
erty, Heppner. 

Eugene — Progressive Theaters Co. : Rex, Ore- 
gon, Eugene, Eugene. 

Pendleton— ('. G. Matlock : Arcade. Pendleton 
Amusement Co. : Pastime, Alta, Pendleton. 
■ Portland— Portland Amusement Co., L. Cohn, 
Mgr., controlling 2nd-run theaters : Casino, Burn- 
side and American. 

North Powder — McCurry & Dahlstrom : Bun- 
galow, North Powder; Liberty, Haines; Cove, 
Cove. 

Roseberg Globe Theater Co. : Antlers, Rose- 
berg ; Globe. Albany. 

The Dalles — A. Bettingon : Grand, Empress, 
The Dalles. 

Ohio 

Akron— Botzum Bros. : Strand, Canton ; Dream- 
land, Orpheum. 

Feiber & Shea : Colonial, Akron ; Majestic and 
Opera House, Canton ; Park, Youngstown, and a 
house at Ashtabula. 

C. W. Rombebbet : Bank, Knickerbocker. 

Stalder & Steyer : Nixon, Spicer. 

Alliance — Peter Tender: Ohio, Aliance; Opera 
House, Lorain. 

Ashtabula — H. W. Johnson: Dome, Casto, 
Majestic. 

Barberton — H. L. Hamilton : Gem, Park. 
Bellaire — Spragg Amusement Co. : Elk Grand, 
Olympic. 

Bellefountain — Daniel Gutilla : Majestic, Strand, 
Bellefountain. 

Belleview — G. R. Moore : Lion and Royal. 



203 




204 



Bryan — Jack Thompson: Xorthside, Grand. 
Cambridge — C. & M. Amusement Co. : Colo- 
nial, Strand. 

Cincinnati — I. Lisbon : Strand, Walnut, Fam- 
ily, Star, Bijou, Cincinnati; Strand, Louisville, 
Ky. ; Strand, Dayton ; Colonial, Columbus. 

I. Frankel : Alhambra, Lubin, Hippodrome, 
Cincinnati ; Temple, Hippodrome, Newport, Ky. ; 
Majestic, Columbus. 

Dr. C. E. Colb: Woodward. Empire, Imperial, 
Xorwood. 

Wm. Gerber: Aragon No. 1, Aragon No. 2, 
Marvel, Fairview and Elvador. 

Frank Huss : Avenue, Gem, Rex, Ohio, Gifts 
and Royal. 

Thomas A. Rieley : Heucks, Peoples, Centre. 

Mrs. Shakespeare : National, Freeman. 

Henrv Levey : Columbia, Park, Liberty. 

Mr. Schaengold : Forrest, Norwood, Plaza. 

Cleveland — G. T. Sharp: Southern. Amphion. 
Sharp is also part owner of Gordon Square, W. 
65th St. and Detroit Ave. 

.Max Lefkowitz: Bronx, 1770 E. 9th St.; 
Gaiety. 1746 E. 9th St.; Wonderland, 1750 E. 
9th St. 

Sam Bullock: Columbia. 2565 St. Clair Ave.; 
Boulevard, 9904 Lorain Ave. 

Charles Miles: Miles, E. 9th and Huron Rd. ; 
Grand, E. 9th and Bolivar Rd. 

S. W. Manhein and B. Todd control Utopia, 
Painesville, O.; Liberty, Geneva, O. 

A. Kaplan: Alpha, 3206 Central Ave.; Grand 
Central. 3543 Central Ave. 

E. F. Flanegan : Crescent and together with 
Frank Xolan, -Terminal. 

H. E. Horowitz: Olympic, Broadway and 55th 
St. ; Rialto, Akron. 

Freer Amusement Co.: Haltnorth. E. 55th St.; 
Fountain, 4800 Woodland Ave. ; Family, 5800 
Quincy Ave. 

J. A. Schwartz: Homestead, 11816 Detroit 
Ave.; Manhattan, E. 105th St. and Superior Ave. 

Loew's Circuit : Stilhnan, Euclid Ave. ; Mall, 
Euclid Ave. ; Euclid, E. 9th St. ; Alhambra, Eu- 
clid Ave. and 105th St.; Liberty, Superior Ave. 
and E. 105th St. 

Paul Gusdonavic : Strand, Orpheum, Norwood. 
Majestic. 

Essick & Reif: Rialto. Jennings, Stork, Ridge. 

Scoville & Essick : Ezella. Sunbeam. 

Scoville & Sharp: Gordon Square, Southern. 

Atlas Amusement Co. : Metropolitan, Knicker- 
bocker, Lakewood, Lakewood, O., and New Co- 
lonial, Cleveland. 

Zalfer Bros. : Reel Corona. 

Schuman, Fine & Kramer: Savoy, Jewell, Yale, 
Dennison Sq. 

J. J. Millert: Shaw-Hayden, Fulton. 

Deutsch Bros. : Sun, Glenside and new house 
building. 

Polcar & Ptak: Empress, Lyceum, Lakeview. 

Wolcott Amuse. Co. : Princess, Cleveland, and 
Liberty, Geneva. 

M. B. Horwitz: Southern and Amphion. 

Columbus — Mrs. M. Amoroso: New, Elk, Co- 
lumbus. 

Tames Gratziano : Superba and Wilmar. 

C. A. King: Parsons and Liberty. 

Will D. Harris: Grand, Hartman. 

T. Frankel: Majestic. Frankel also owns 11 
houses in Cincinnati territory. 

Fred Postle: Victor, Avondale. 

Coshocton— C. G. Chacos: Pastime, Utahna. 

Dayton — John Seifert : Majestic, Ideal 
, . Dennison— S. C. Vale: Pictorium, Dennison; 
\ ale s. Urichsville. 

Dillonvale— K. Olszeski: Olszeski, Palace, Dil- 
lonvale. 

Rlyria— Milton Phelos : Strand, American, Co- 
lor'al, Dreamland. 

^ostoria— Buck Bros.: Colonial, new house 
building, 

Ironton— Nick McMahon : Southside, Grand, 
[ronton; Regent, Russel, Ky. 

Mansfield— W. A. Partello : Grand and Majes- 
tic ; Opera House. 

Marietta— C. & M. Amusement Co. : Hippo- 
drome. Marietta; Strand, Cambridge. 

Marion Marion Photoplay Go. : Marion, Or- 
pheus, Marion; Southern, Bucyrus. 



Martin's Ferry— L. F. Kick : Fenray, Pastime. 
Newark — G. M. Fenberg : Alhambra, Audito- 
rium. 

LaMotte Smith: Columbia and Ideal, Alliance, 
also Strand, Sebring. 

N. Baltimore — Mrs. Gibson : Crown, Rex. 

Norwalk — W. H. Price: Linwood Square, Erie, 
Vermillion. 

Salem — P. C. Calleges : Grand Opera House, 

Royal. 

Sandusky — Geo. Schade: Plaza, Schade. 

Sebring — H. W. Lundgren : Globe, Columbi- 
ana ; New Belmont. 

Springfield — Gus Sun Amusement Co. : Fair- 
banks. Alhambra. Sun, Regent, and new theaters 
not named and now building in Portsmouth, Iron- 
ton. Toledo and Columbus. 

Steubenville — A. G. Constant : Strand, Olym- 
pic, Steubenville ; American, East Liverpool. 

Struthers — Tigue & Kelley : Amuse-U, Struth- 
ers ; American, Leetonia. 

Toledo — H. C. Horater: Alhambra, Pantheon, 
Toledo. 

A. Patterson: Melvin, Star. 

H. V. Price: Lindwood Sq., Norwalk; Crys- 
tal, Vermillion. 

Dixon : Metro, Dragon, Empress, Regent. 

Youngstown — Robbins Bros. : Bijou, Rex, 
Youngstown ; Duchess, Warren. Dome Amuse- 
ment Co. : Dome and Victory. 

Zanesville — Imperial Theater Co., Sam E. Lind, 
Pres. : Imperial and Quinby. 

Oregon 

Albany— Globe Theaters Co. (Hill & Hudson), 
Globe and Liberty, Albany ; Antlers and Majestic, 
Roseburg; Gem, Sutherland; Bungalow, Oakland. 

Astoria — Astoria Amuse Co. 

Medford— Geo. A. Hunt & Co. : Rialto. Page 
and Liberty, Medford; Star and Liberty, Grant's 
Pass ; Rialto, Ashland. 

Oklahoma 

Chandler — Hoover and Stettmund : Odeon. 
Building another. 

Enid — Roy Abernathy : Royal, Enid ; Odeon, 
Fairview. 

Muskogee — L. W. - Brophy : Yale, Muskogee; 
Yale, Vinita ; New Yale, Muskogee ; Claremore, 

Claremore. 

Oklahoma City— H. C. Brice: Strand. To 
build another. 

Tucker Brothers : Dreamland, Oklahoma City ; 
Wonderland, Royal. Tulsa ; Regent, Blackwell ; 
Guthrie, Guthrie; Mission, Ponca City. 

Vinita — T. H. Slothower: Mystic, Webb City, 
Mo. ; Rex, Yale ; Lyric, Vinita. 

Pennsylvania 

Audubon — -Cusack & Romm : Audubon and 
Palmyra. 

Altoona — A. Notopjalos : Palace, Olympic, Al- 
toona; Palace, Johnstown. 

Barnesboro — J. Smith : Grand, New Strand. 

Bethlehem — Heilberger Interests: Lorenz, Or- 
pheum, Broad. 

Blairsville — F. McGowan : Grand. Regent. 
Blairsville; Rex, Iselin ; Rex, Luzerne Mines; 
Rex, Earnest. 

Brownsville — T. Wright : Bison, Strand, 
Brownsville; Strand, Butler. 

Carbondale — L. 9. Rarrell : 2. 

Chester — G. Bernstein: 2. 

Connellsville — C. A. Wagner: Paramount, 

Soisson. 

Du Bois— A. P. Way: Carleton Ave. 
Easton— H. E. Woehrle : 3. 

East Pittsburgh — N. Nalonas : Frederick, Loy- 
al, Lyric. 

Erie — Columbia Amusement Co. : Columbia, 
Majestic; Library, Warren 

Glassport — F. Smith : New Palace, Glassport. 

Greenberg — M. Manos : Strand, Grand. 

Greenville — W. J. Silverberg : Olympic, Mer- 
cer Square. 

Harrisburg — Wilmer &• Vincent. 

Hazleton — H. Hersker: 2. Mike Coll: 2. 

Homestead — J. E. Stahl : Elite, Palace, Grand, 
Crescent. 

John-tiwn — Scherer & Kelly : Cambria, New 
Park, Johnstown. 

Lancaster — Geo. Krupa : 2. 



ANTHONY PAUL KELLY 

"Three Faces East 11 

# 

D. W. Griffith's "Way Down East" 

Adaptation 

Lillian Gish in "The Eternal Feminine" 

Original Story 



Coming Legitimate 
Productions 

"THE WHITE CIPHER" 
"THE TIDE" 
"THE BORDER" 



20* 



Latrobe- W. Lampopolis : Paramount, Olympic. 

Lock Haven — Excel Amusement Enter.: Gar- 
den, Lock Haven ; another in Williamsport. 

McKees Rocks— M. Akselrarl : Mars, Castle, 
Superior,, Regent. 

McMechen — M. A. Sybert : .Midway, McMech- 
en, W. Va. ; Park, Moundsville, W. Va. 

New Castle — West Penn Photoplay Co.: Re- 
gent, Star, Penn, New Castle. 

New Kensington — M. Dattola : Strand, Impe- 
rial, Vic, Johnstown, New Kensington. 

Oil City — Penn Amusement Co. : Opera House, 
Yenange. 

W. A. McCartney: Venango, Princess. 

Patton — W. A. Dinsmore : Majestic, Grand. 

Philadelphia — Louis Hirsh : Forrest and Spruce. 

Stanley Co. of America: Alhambra, Allegheny, 
Appollo, Arcade Palace, Arcadia, Baltimore, Bel- 
mont, Benn, Bluebird, Broad St. Casino, Broad- 
way, Brunswick, Capitol, Century, Cross Keys, 
Colonial Gtm., Darby, Empress, Fairmount, Fam- 
ily, 56th St., 58th St., Franklin, Germantown, 
Globe, Great Northern, Imperial 60th St., Impe- 
rial 2nd St., Jumbo, Leader, Lehigh Palace, Lib- 
erty, Lincoln, Locust, Logan, Auditorium, .333 
Market St., Model, New Broadway, Nixon, On- 
tario, Overbrook, Orient, Palace, Paschall, Wil- 
liam Penn, Plaza, Point Breeze, Princess, Regent, 
Rialto. Ridge, Rivoli, Ruby, Savoy, Sherwood. 
Somerset, Stanley, Strand, Victoria, West Alle- 
gheny, Wishart, Auditorium; Regent, Allentown; 
Opera House and Palace, Berwick ; Opera House, 
Conshohocken ; Grand and Washburn, Chester; 
Colonial and Third St., Easton ; Colonial and Vic- 
toria, Harrisburg; Grand, Lancaster; Academy 
and Strand, Lebanon; Bijou Dream, Milton; Gar- 
rick and Grand, Norristown ; Broad, Plymouth ; 
Garden, Pottsville; Roman, Pittston ; Arcadia, 
Colonial, Lyric and Princess, Reading ; Strand, 
Scranton ; Arcade, Shenandoah ; Grand Opera 
House and Palace, South Bethlehem ; Grand, Ri- 
alto and Idle Hour, West Chester ; Hippodrome 
and Keeney's, Williamsport; Savoy, Wilkes- Barre ; 
Majestic and Queen, Wilmington. 

G. W. Bennethum: 16. Wm. Hunt: Wild- 
wood. Haddon Heights. Green & Altman : 6. 
M. Steife] : 9. J. F. Hayes: 2. Geo. Carey: 2. 
Wm. Weisbord: 3. Albert Fischer: 2. A. Wax: 
3. C. Stamper: 4. B. Borowski: 3. J Becker: 

2. Chas Segall: 2. M. A. Benn: 2. J. Wolf: 

3. J. Schwartzman : 2. Earle Forte: 2. Harry 
Green : 5. 

Pittsburgh — Harry Davis : Grand, Lyric, Won- 
derland. Temple, Wm. Penn, Harris, Sheridan 
Square. Pittsburgh. 

N. Freidberg: Alhambra, Triangle, Garden. 

Sam Gould: Gould, Arcadia, Atlas. 

M. Rosen : Park, Model. Brighton. 

I. Browarskey : Rex, Centre Square, Victoria, 
Kenyon. 

F. Smith : New Palace, Penn Ave. 

Punxsatawney — W. P. McCartney: Majestic 
Alpine. Jefferson, Punxsatawney. Strand, Ridge- 
way ; Rivoli, Johnsonburg. 

Reading — Carr and Schad : Strand, Colonial, 
Arcadia, Princess and San Toy. 

Wilmer and Vincent to build here. 

Scranton — M. E. Comerford Amuse. Co. : Chain 
of about 40 houses up state. 

Shamokin — L. J. Chamberlain Amuse. Co., 

Sharon — F. E. Young: Alpha, Sharon; Colo- 
nial. Sharpsville; Gem, Jamestown. 

Titusville — Titusville Amusement Co. : Grand, 
gent. Star, Penn. 

Grand Amusement Co. : Nemo, Park, Park- 
view and Grand. 

Uniontown — Penn Theatre and Amusement Co.: 
Rex, Penn., Imp. 

Washington— H. S. Wheatley : Idle Hour, 
Court, Washington. 

Waynesboro — C. F. Silveris : Opera House, 
Eclipse, 

Wilkes-Barre — F. E. Devlin: 2. 

Wilkinsburg — Colonial Amusement Co. : Row- 
land, Colonial. 

Williamsport — Jack C. Myers: Majestic, City, 
Williamsport ; Crawford, Canton ; Palace, Mon- 
toursville ; Garden, Lock Haven ; Victoria, Jer- 
sey Shore ; Family, Troy. 

York— X. Appell: 3. 



South Carolina 

Charleston — Pastime Amuse. Co. : Victory, 
Academy of Music, Garden, Princess and Ma- 

JeS Coiumbia— L. T. Lester: Rivoli, Ideal, Rialto 
and Broadway. 

Orangeburg — J. H. Ziehler : Reliance and 
Bluebird. 

South Dakota 

Aberdeen— McCarthy Bros.: Waterton and Ab- 
erdeen, N. D. : Grand Forks and Fargo. 

Deadwood— M. C. Kellogg: Deadwood, Dead- 
wood; Homestake Opera House. 

Grand Forks— A. J. Kavanagh : Grand Forks 
and Jameston, N. D. ; suburban house in Min- 
neapolis. 

Tennessee 

Bristol— Central Amuse. Co. : 2 houses. Mr. 
Gober : 2 houses. 

Chattanooga — Signal Amusement Co. (now 
under control of Southern Enterprises) : Operate 
in Chattanooga, Knoxville and Maryville. York 
Amusement So. : 2 houses. 

Clarkesville— Toe Goldberg: Lillian and Ma- 
jestic. 

Lenoir City — L. E. Denton : 2 houses. 
Memphis — W. Roberts: Princess, to build one 
Lynch Enterprises: 7 and 2 in Dyersburg. 
Nashville — Crescent Amuse. Co.: 9 houses. 

Texas 

Amarillo— Dye, Ford & Rogers: Mission, Ama- 
rillo; Olympic, Wichita Falls; Olympic, Plain- 
view; Olympic, Canyon (Sou. Ent. control). 

Beaumont — John I. Pittman. 

Dallas — Southern Enterprises: Old Mill, Queen, 
Hippodrome, Crystal, Dallas; Queen, Liberty, Zoe, 
Prince, Houston; Queen, Tremont, Galveston; 
Hippodrome, Rex, Washington, Victory, Waco; 
Crescent, Temple; Star, Denison ; Opera House, 
Greenville. 

Foy's Neighborhood Theaters. 

Eastland — Tom Harrell. 

Henrietta — H. L. Bear: Dorothy; to build an- 
other. , , 

Jacksonville — Bolton's Theatres: Park, Jack- 
sonville ; Queen, Rusk ; Majestic, Alto. 

Lubbock — E. M. McElroy : Lyric, Strand, 
Ralls. „ „ . „ 

Mart— Robb & Rowley Theatre Ent. : R. & R. 
Queen, Mart; Odeon. Ft. Worth; R. & R. Queen. 
Sweetwater; R. & R. Queen, Big Springs; R. & 
R. Queen, Winters. 

McAllen — Valley Amusement Co. : Queen, Mc- 
Allen ; Pastime, San Benito; Pastime, Mercedes; 
Crown, Donna; Electric, Mission. 

Orange — Orange Amuse. Co. : 

Sherman — Wm. Batsell. 

Virginia 

Alexandria — Reid & Steel; operates 3. 

Lynchburg — Mr. Casey : operates 2. 

Newport News— E. T. Crall : Operates 4. 

Petersburg — Charles Moss: operates 3. 

Richmond— Wells Amuse. Co. : Colonial, Bijou, 
Isis, Odeon. Victor, Richmond; Wells, Strand, 
American, Grandy, Academy of Music, Colonial, 
Norfolk. Bluebird Amuse. Co.: Bluebird, Rich- 
mond; Bluebird, Petersburg. John Pryor : one in 
Richmond; one in Danville. E. D. Hind: op- 
erates 15. 

Utah 

Bingham— Brisk & Chesler : Princess Hyland 

Boy. 

Brigham City- C. E. Pierce: Liberty, Brig- 
ham City; Liberty, Garland; Liberty, Tremonton. 

Logan— B. G. Thatcher: Oak, Lyric. 

Murray — Frank Burgner : Iris, Happy Hour. 

Ogden— S. B. Steck : Cozy Lyceum, Ogden. 

Richfield— A. L. Stalling: Rex, Richfield; El- 
sinore, Elsinore; Opera House, Salina; Elite, Mt. 
Pleasant; Empire, Monroe. 

Salt Lake— Swanson Theatre Circuit: Amer- 
ican, Strand, Gem. Salt Lake City; Elk, Rexburg. 

Smithfield— John Hillyard: Opera House. Smith- 
field; Opera House, Richmond; Opera House, 
Providence. 

Sunnyside — Bert Martin: Martin, Sunnyside; 
Martin, Castle Gate; Martin, Clear Creek. 



207 



WILLIAM 


RUSSELL 


Early Fall Special, "THE 


MAN WHO DARED' 


[Recent Releases: "THE IRON RIDER" "THE TWINS OF SUFFERING 
CREEK""THE LINCOLN HIGHWAYMAN '""CHALLENGE of the LAW" 


Representation through 
MABEL CONDON EXCHANGE 


FOX PACIFIC COAST STUDIOS 



208 



Majestic, Fre- 

Lerouge : Wonder, Battle- 
Ridge Field, Ridge 



Washington 

Aberdeen — Western Circuit: Rex and Bijou; 
Aberdeen ; Rialto, Liberty and Grand, Centralia. 

Anacortes — Sam Mendelson : Empire, Grand, 
Anacortes. 

Ballard— Geddes & Geddes : 
mont, College. 

Battleground — S. 
ground ; Peoples, Yacolt ; 
Field. 

Bellingham— W. S. Quimby : Liberty, Bell, Star. 

Buckley; — O. E. Groesbeck : Cosmo, Buckley ; 
Liberty, Enumclaw ; Cosmo, Wilkinson. 

Chehalis — J. D. Rice: Dream, Chehalis; Dream, 
On ol ssIn ti 

Cle Eliim— Dunn's Theatre Cir. : Victory, Cle 
Elum ; Mabton, Mabton ; Rose, Roslyn. 

Ellensburg — W. W. Rogers: Colonial, Iris, 
Ellensburg. 

Everett — Star Amuse. Co. : Star, Everett, 
Broadway, Princess, Rialto, Rose, Everett. 

Hoquiam — Henry Neuman : Arcade and Lib- 
erty ; building another. 

Kelso — Vogue Amusement Co. : Vogue, Kelso ; 
Grand, Rainier ; Peoples, Clatskanie. 

Lynden — Jack Kauffman : Liberty, Lynden ; 
Opera House, Everson. 

Montesano — Gem Theatre Circuit : Gem, Mon- 
tesano ; Gem, Elmo ; Gem, McClery. 

Mt. Vernon — A. S. Murphy : Mission, Mt. Ver- 
non ; Grand, Burlington. 

Newport — W. L. Casey : Rex, Newport ; Casey, 
Laclede, Ida. 

Olympia — E. Zabel and W. Bowmani. Rex, 
Ray. * ,. 

Pasco — J. E. Reynolds : Liberty, Pasc<f ; Prin- 
cess, Kennewick ; Klinger, Connell. 

Seattle — Michael Lyons : Union Victory. 
Jos. Danz: Imperial, Little, Rialto, Iris, 
Dream, Seattle. 

Greater Theaters Co. (Jensen & Von Herberg, 
Inc.) : Liberty, Coliseum, Strand and Rex, Seat- 
tle ; Liberty, Star, Columbia, Majestic, People's 
and Union Ave., Portland; Rialto, Strand, Colo- 
nial and Sunset, Tacoma ; Rialto, Butte ; Liberty, 



Yakima; Rialto, Dream and Rex, Bremerton. 

Snohomish — j. E. Beardsley : Orpheum, Sno- 
homish; Monroe, Monroe; Primrose, Sultan. 

South Tacoma— R. R. Pratsch : Idle Hour; 
building Realart, Tacoma. 

Spokane — J. W. Allender : Majestic and Lyric. 
Spokane; Orpheum, oscoe ; Liberty, Colfax; 
Liberty, Pullman. 

Stillwell Theatres : Casino, Unique, Class A, 
Spokane. 

Sunnyside — Sunnyside Amuse. Co. : American, 
Sunnyside ; Colonial, Grandview. 

Wenatchee — N. W. Theatres Co.: Liberty, 

Vador — R. W. Charles (also in Castle Rock). 
Yakima — Mercy Amusement Co. : Majestic, Em- 
pire and Yakima. 

Wyoming 

Kemmerer-«p. Whitten : New Kemmerer, Kem- 
merer; OperarHouse, Diamondville ; Opera House, 
Frontier; Opera House, North Kemmerer. 

Sheridan — Ben Collier : Orpheum, Gem, Sheri- 
dan. 

West Virginia , 

Bluefield — Colonial Amusement Co., 
Clarksburg-ljack Marx. , 
Charleston-^T. L. Kearse : Burlew, Strand, Hip- 
podrome, Colonial, Elk and Alhambra. 

Holden — Fred Middleberg: Logan, Holden : De- 
hue.Ethel. 

Parkersburg — Smoot Amusement Co.: Camdei 
and Lincoln, Parkersburg. 

Huntington — Lyric Amusement Co. : Lyrid 
and Orpheum, Huntington. Hyman Brothers. j 

Wheeling — J. Velas: Liberty, Lyric, Wheeling. | 

C. Fennler : Colonial, Virginia. 

Wisconsin 

Chippewa Falls — Chippewa Theater Co., Inc. : 
Palace, Rex and Empire. 

Eau Claire — Eau Claire Theater Co. 

Milwaukee — Saxe Amuse. Enter. : Alhambra, 
Strand, Princess, Theatorium, Miller, Savoy and 
Modjeska. j 

Kenosha — Charles Pacini : Crystal. 



LICHTIG & ROTH WELL, INC. M 



PRODUCERS. PUBLISHERS AND 
PLAYERS REPRESENTATIVES 



.) 577450 
/ HOLLY, 3929 



6372 Hollywood Blvd. 



Hollywood. California 



ml 



209 



DAVID BUTLER 



210 



M. P. D. A. 



The Motion Picture Directors' Association was founded in February, 1915, Holly- 
wood, California. There was a need of coordination among directors at the time, 
devoting their energies to the improvement of film productions. Many of these were 
unknown, personally, one to the other. Good fellowship, and the great results which 
now reflect to the honor and glory of combined ideas and exchange of suggestions 
among fellow-directors, had not been thought of. Common grievance, however, brought 
them close together. Slander against conditions supposedly existing in studios, jealousy 
among producers, scheming, malice. Conditions affecting directors were deplorable. 
One producing company claimed the right to photograph exclusively, eliminating other 
companies entirely, the Heaven given stretch o f ocean front and rock ledges in 
Southern California. Directors were held responsible for things which never happened, 
or with which they had nothing to do. 

Organization suggested, the first meeting was attended by nine directors, although 
many more would have joined the gathering were it not for the down-pour of rain, which 
kept others away, who expected to be present. Those who were fortunate enough to 
arrive at the first meeting place describe the night as being the most severe rain storm 
ever "staged." The spirit of cooperation, however, manifested itself steadily and from that 
night on the gradual growth of the organization of Motion Picture Directors has been 
a source of great pride to its members. 

Primarily, the establishing of the New York Lodge (organized in 1917) was the 
result of increased efforts of the eastern men to compete in the matter of production 
against coast activities. The successful achievement of the coast directors to combine 
forces, thus to improve conditions as well as combat false accusation, appealed with 
active power to the thinking motion picture director of the east. 

The Lodge of Motion Picture Directors is neither a union nor a social club. It is 
a fraternal order. Its rituals render impossible the idea of coercion and eliminates any 
element of partiality or unfairness. 

"The essential purpose of the organization" to quote one of the founders, "is to fill 
that great need of providing a clearing house of ideas, which every art has required 
and through which every art has succeeded in developing to its highest forms." 

Followers of motion pictures are fast determining their favorite directors, as well 
as their favorite stars. A supposedly great star cannot appear to advantage in a poorly 
directed picture, while previously undiscovered talent has risen to heights unbelievable 
via the skill of a competent director. 



LILLIAN R. GALE. 



John G. Adolfi. 
George Archainbaud. 
Edwin August. 
Keanan Buel. 
Col. E. H. Calvert. 
Emile Chautard. 
Frank H. Crane. 
J. Searle Dawley. 
Oscar Eagle. 
Robert Ellis. 
George Fitzmaurice. 
Wm. F. Haddock. 
John Jos. Harvey. 




Charles M. Seay. 

George B. Seitz. 

Tom Terriss. 

Travers Vale. 

Wally Van. 

Perry G. Vekroff. 

Robert G. Vignola. 

lames Vincent. 

Raoul A. Walsh. 

Kenneth Webb. 

Harry MacRae Webster. 

Jay C. Williams. 

Fred E. Wright. 



LOS ANGELES LODGE 



Reginald Barker. 
Frank Beal. 
Harry Beaumont. 
Wm. Beaudine. 
Wm. Bertram. 
John G. Blystone. 
Frank Borzage. 
Van Dyke Brook. 
F^dwin Carewe. 
Colin Campbell. 
I.loyd B. Carleton. 
Al. E. Christie. 
Louis Wm. Chaudet. 
Roy Clements. 
E. F. Cline. 
Jack Conway. 
Donald W. Crisp. 
Wm. Robt. Daly. 
Joseph DeGrasse. 
J. F. Dillon. 
Wm. Duncan. 
Allan Dwan. 
J. Gordon Edwards. 
F'red Fishbach. 



Francis Ford. 
Chas. K. French. 
Louis Gasnier. 
Douglas Gerrard. 
James Gordon, Tech. Dir. 
Gilbert P. Hamilton. 
Thomas N. Heffron. 
Victor Herman. 
E. Mason Hopper. 
Howard Hickman. 
Allen J. Holubar. 
Jay Hunt. 
John Ince. 
Lloyd Ingraham. 
Jacques Jaccard. 
Fred A. Kelsey. 
Henry King. 
Ed. J. LeSaint. 
Frank Lloyd. 

N'orval MacGregor, Treasurer. 
Murdock J. MacQuarrie. 
J. P. McGowan. 
George Marshall. 
George Melford. 



Stuart Patton. 
. FYancis J. Powers. 
Wm. Parke. 



Victor Schertzinger. 
H. Scott Sidney. 



• Henrv W. Xeill. 
. Wm. R. Neille. 
■ Henry W. Otto. 



James Young. 



Geo. A. Siegman. 
Edward Solman. 
Phillips Smalley. 
S. E. V. Taylor. 
Wm. Desmond Taylor. 
Frederick A. Thompson. 
Maurice Tourneur. 
Ernest Ward. 
Raymond B. West. 
Ben Wilson. 
Wm. Worthington. 



Lynn F. Reynolds. 
Thos. V. Ricketts, Secretary. 
Wm. Russell. 



Chas. J. Parrott. 



211 



FREDRIK VOGEDING 




Noted Dutch F Actor 

from 

"The Royal Theatre" 

Amsterdam, Holland 



With a record of thirty 
pictures made in Europe. 
Vogeding will make first 
screen appearance in Amer- 
ica with 

"The Famous Players" 



Permanent Address 
11 EAST 44th STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



212 



ASSISTANT DIRECTORS' ASSO. 
5444 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Cal. 



Alt, Alexander 


Greene, Al. 


^iipnant, 


-.Mien, u. 


Hollingshead, Gordon 


Ong, Dave 


.Deal, ocotty K.. 


Hodge, Rex 


yj 5nea, J. 


Bennett, Chester 


Howard, Dave 


Peebles, M. S. 


Berth el on, George 


Howard, William 


Richardson, F. 


B urns, Harry 


Howland, L. A. 


Rose, A. 


C 1 e m ens, J . 


Huber, Charles 


ivusseii, /vi. 


C onuors, Buck 


IT XT' 11 1 . -. * *■ 

Howe, H-lliott 


Robinson, F. 


Crinley, William A. 


King, Bert 


Schenck, Harry 


v^roit, r* reu 


Laemmle, Kddie 


onerer, w . in . 
Sowders, E. A. 


Crone, George 


Lascelle, Ward 


l-'agW en, vv . 


Lawton, Jack 


oidi mi j<s, v^iidx ies> 


Dawson, Doug 


t ~ .... tr^n.,K 

Lowry, rrank 


outcn, rsert 


De Courcey, W. 


Luddy, Irving 


Xaurog, Norman 


j-vt. ivue, n>. 
Dyer, William J, 


Laver, Jack 


Teubrooke, H. 


Manter, Les 


Thome, Frank A. 


Eason Reeves 




Traxler Ernest 


Ensinger, R. 


Meeker, Roy 
Mitchell, C. H. 


Tyler, Fred 


Frame, Park 


Watt, Allen 


Flaven, Art 


Murphy, Martin 


Webster, George 


Gereghty, F. 


McDonough, J. 


Whittaker, C. 


Gerald, Pete 


McCloskey, J. H. 


Wright, Mac 


Goldaine, Mark 


McGowan, R. 


Zerr, E. J. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS IN 

Jan. 1 — New Year's Day (except in Mass. 

and Dist. of Col.). 
Jan. 19 — Birthday of Gen. Lee (in Ala, 

Ark., Fla., Ga , Miss., N. C., S. C., 

Va.). 

Feb. 12 — Lincoln's Birthday (in almost 

every state). 
Feb. 12 — Georgia Day in Ga. 
Feb. 22— Washington's Birthday (all 
over Union). 

Mar. 4 — Mardi Gras (in Ala., Fla., La., in 
the parishes of New Orleans, St. Ber- 
nard, Jefferson, St. Charles and St. 
John the Baptist). 

Mar. 17— Arbor Day (in Okla.). 

April 6 — Arbor Day (in N. Ariz.). 

April 12 — Halifax Independence Resolu- 
tions (in N. Car.). 

April 13 — Jefferson's Birthday (in Ala.). 

April 15— Arbor Day (in Utah). 

April 18 — Good Friday (in Ala., Conn., 
Del., Fla., La., Md., Minn., N. J., Pa. 
and Tenn.). 

April 19 — Patriot's Day (in Me., Mass.). 

April 21 — San Jacinto Day (in Tex.). 

April 21— Arbor Day (in Col. and Neb.). 

April 23— Fast Day (in N. H.). 

April 26 — Confed. Mem. Day (in Ala., 
Fla., Ga., and Miss.). 

May 9— Arbor Day (in R. I.). 

May 10— Confed. Mem. Day (in N. Car., 
S. Car. and Tenn.). 

May 12— Mothers' Day (in N. Mex.). 

May 18— Peace Day (in N. Mex.). 

May 20 — Anniv. Signing of the Mecklen- 
burg Declaration of Independence (in 
N. Car.). 

May 30— M emorial Day (in Ariz., Cal., 
Col., Conn., Del., Dist. of Col., Idaho, 
111., Ind., Ia., Kan., Ky., Me., Md., 
Mass., Mich., Minn., Mo., Mont, 
Neb., Nev., N. H , N. J., N. Mex., 
N. Y., N. Dak., Ohio. Okla., Ore., Pa.. 



THE UNITED STATES 

R. I., S. Dak., Tenn., Vt., Va., Wash., 

W. Va., Wis., Wyo.). 
May 30 — Confed. Mem. Day (in Va.). 
June 3 — Jefferson Davis' Birthday (in 

Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Miss., S. Car., 

Tenn., Tex.). 
June 3 — Confed. Memorial Day (in La.). 
June 15 — Pioneer Day (in Idaho). 
June 17 — Bunker Hill Day (in Boston). 

Not a legal holiday, but banks close 

by general agreement. 
July 4 — Independence Day (all over Un- 
ion). 

July 24— Pioneer Day (in Utah). 

Aug. 1 — Colorado Day (in Col.). 

Aug. 16 — Bennington Battle Day (in Vt.). 

Aug. 20-21— Good Roads Day (in Mo.). 

Sept. 2 — Labor Day (except in N. Mex. 
and Dist of Col.). 

Sept. 9 — Admission Day (in Cal.). 

Sept. 12— Old Defender's Day (in Balti- 
more, Md.). 

Oct. 7 — Missouri Day (in Mo.). 

Oct. 12 — Columbus Day (in Ala., Ark., 
Cal., Conn.. Col., Del., Idaho, III., 
Ind., Kan., Ky., Me., Md., Mass., 
Mich., Mo., Mont., Neb., Nev., N. H., 
N. J., N. Mex., N. Y., Ohio, Okla., 
Ore., Pa , R. I., Tev., Va., Wash., W. 
Va.). 

Oct. 13 — Farmers' Day (in Fla.). 

Oct. 26— Fraternal Day (in Ala.). 

Oct. 31 — Admission Day (in Nev.). 

Nov. 1 — All Saints' Day (in La.). 

Nov. 1 — State Fire Day (in Neb.). 

Nov. 4 — Flection Day (1st Tuesday after 
the 1st Monday in November. All 
over Union, except Dist. of Col.). 

Nov. 27 — National Thanksgiving Day (us- 
ually the last Thursday in Novem- 
ber. In every State and Dist. of Col.). 

Dec. 3 — Arbor Day (in Ga.). 

Dec. 25 — Christmas Day (all over Union ) . 



Charles Ray Productions 

INCORPORATED 
Los Angeles 

SB 

Starring Charles Ray in Pop- 
ular Stage Success and Novels 



NEW YORK REPRESENTATIVE, ARTHURS. KANE 
RELEASED BY FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS' CIRCUIT 



214 



PUBLISHERS OF TAX FREE MUSIC 

Following is a list of music publishers who are not members of the Society of Amer- 
ican Authors and Composers whose music can be played by either orchestra or music 
roll, tax free: 

Asher, Emil 1155 Broadwav New York 

Balhnger, Edward L. Music Publishing Co .' Los Angeles, Cal. 

Berg S. M... Columbia Theater Building New York 

Bond, Carrie Jacobs 746 South .Michigan Avenue Chicago, IU. 

Boosey & Co 9 East 17th Street New York 

Boston Music Co 26-28 West Street Boston, Mass. 

Broadway Music Co New York 

Browne. Ted, Music Co., Inc. .. .7.323 Madison Street .WW..'." Chicago, 111 

Carlson, M. L. & Co ll.il Masonic Temple Chicago, 111. 

o C ° London, England 

Craig & Co 145 North Clark Street Chicago, 111. 

Uitson Oliver & Co 178 Tremont Street Boston, Mass. 

J*ay Louis J. Publishing Co 181 Tremont Street Boston, Mass. 

iMscher, Carl 46154 Cooper Square New York 

*ox, Sam, Publishing Co 340-346 The Arcade Cleveland, Ohio 

Gilbert & Fnedland, Inc 232 West 46th Street New York 

Graham Roger 143 North Dearborn Street Chicago, 111. 

Granville, Bernard, Publishing Co., 

'" c - •■• 145 West 45th Street New York 

Hinds. Hayden & Eldredge, Inc 

Publishers 1M5 Union Square New York 

Hutsmger &• Dilworth 505 Fifth Avenue New York 

Ideal Music Co Chicago, 111. 

Inter-City Music Co Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jacobs, Walter 8 Bosworth Street Boston, Mass. 

Jenkins. J. W. Sons Music Co Kansas City. Mo. 

L- U '!P' nlc ,,! e - Ross 15 Whitehall Street New York 

Kelly W. A. Music Co 4720 South Wabash Avenue Chicago. 111. 

Keudis^Brockman Music Co 145 West 45th Street New York 

Krey Music Co 361 Washington Street Boston, Mass. 

Manning, Clarice & Co 967 Beechwood Drive Hollywood. Cal 

McCarthy & Fisher 148 West 45th Street New York 

McKmely Music Co 145 West 45th Street New York 

Morris Josephy & Co 119 North Clark Street Chicago, 111., and New York 

Kenn Music Co 145 West 45th Street Xew York 

leitfer, Arthur Co 127 Maine Street 1 Quincy. 111. 

1 :antadosi, Al. & Co.. Inc Astor Theater Building New York 

Richmond, Maurice & Co 145 West 45th Street -New York 

Roberts, Lee S 412 Fine Arts Building Chicago, 111 

Kosey, Geo. Publishing Co 24 Fast 21st Street New York 

Kossiter, Will 71 Randolph Street Chicago. 111. 

Schirmer G. K ast 43r d Street New York 

.Vhuherth. Edw. & Co 11 East 22nd Street New York 

Sherman, (lay & Co Kearney and Sutter Streets San Francisco, Cal. 

Southern California Music Co 332 South Broadway Los Angeles, Cal. 

Siebrecht, Arthur M. & Co Lexington, Ky. 

c y J ly ' Mus '= Co 423 West Walnut Street Louisville, Ky. 

Snyder Music Publishing Co 24 West 45th Street New York 

Stasny, A. J. Music Co Strand Theater Building New York 

Summy Clayton F. & Co 64 East Van Buren Street Chicago, 111 

Stone & Thompson 143 North Dearborn Street Chicago, 111 

iaylor Tell Grand Opera House Building Chicago, 111. 

Inangle Music Co 821 Gravier Street New Orleans, La. 

Urbenek Bros 5026 South Talman Avenue Chicago, 111. 

Victor Music Co 1132 Masonic Temple Chicago, 111. 

Volkwe.n Bros. ... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Von Tilzer, Harry, Music Co 222 West 46th Street New York 

Wvf rS c"'.. Be ^ in & £ nyder N « w York 

VVhite-Smith Music Publishing Co.. 62-64 Stanhope Street Boston Mass 

Winn School of Popular Music 155 West 125th Street New York 



MOTION PICTURES ART 
Los Angeles 

Alfred W. Alley, 1632K- Winona Blvd. 

Frank S. Brown. 142 W. 37th PI. 

Ben Carre. 6732 Hollywood Blvd. 

David B. Edwards, 984 N. Raymond Ave. 

Robert J. Ellis. 1827 N\ Vermont Ave. 

Charles I. Farber. Detroit, Mich. 

Lewis Geib. 4426 Russell Ave. 

Fred Gabourie, Jesse Hampton Studio. 

Edward 1. Haas, 7726 Walnut Drive. 

Esdras C. Hartley, 130 S. Harvard Blvd. 

Alfred Herman, 1756 N. New Hampshire St. 

W. S. Hinshelwood, 5663 Santa Monica Blvd. 

C. Tracy Hoag, 1143 Logan St. 

John K. Holden, 745 Cahuenga Ave. 

G. A. Hollocker. 1312 Maryland St. 

Charles D. Hull. 4555 Prospect Ave. 

.1 I Jackman, 1429 Logan St. 

Charles H Keyson, 7266 Sunset Blvd. 

Edward M. l.angley, 3105^4 Kenwood Ave. 

Roy H. McCray. 1516 N. Normandie Ave. 

Milton T. Menasco, 651 1J4 Hollywood Blvd. 



DIRECTORS ASSOCIATION 

Amos J. Myers, 716 Wilcox St. 
Charles Odds, 123 N. Grand Ave. 
Jack Okey, 547 N. Ardmore Ave. 
Earle F. Olin. 5417 Sunset Blvd. 
Frank D. Ormston. Haworth Studio. 
Max Parker, 919 W. 35th PI. 
A. R. Ritter, 1900 Bellevue Ave. 
J. J. Rogers, 5536 De Longpre St. 
E. E. Sheeley, 1601 Edgemont St. 
W. E. Shepherd, 347 Ti. 33d St. 

E. J. Shutter, Metro Studio. 

R. E. Sibley, 2138 Marathon St. 
Wilson Silsby, 323 Bullard Bldg. 

F. C. Slingluff, Claremont Studio. 

M. P. Staulcup. Metro Studio, N. Y. City. 

A. B. Sturges, 4561 W. 2nd St. 

Sydney Ullman. 1557 Gordon St. 

T. F. Warwillow. 1546 N. Western Ave. 

George F. Williams, 866 Echo Park Ave. 

Rex D. Weston. Gibson Apts., 4th and Hope Sts. 

Frank H. Webster. Santa Monica. 

Gabe Pollock. 3800 Mission Blvd. 

Art I. Rouda, Alvarado Apts., 9th and Alvarado 



215 



HENRY KING 



Jesse D. Hampton Special 
Productions 



DIRECTOR OF: 

Hours' Leave" 
"One Hour Before Dawn" 
"Help Wanted— Male" 



V 

Willis and Inglis Exclusive Representatives 



216 



What of the Coming Year? 

Symposium of ideas from producers, distributors, exhibitors and others as to what 1920- 
1921 has in store — Optimism the keynote. 



Greatest Year Ever Known 

"The coming year will record important changes 
in the fundamentals of the business, from which 
will evolve a greater degree of independence both 
for producer and exhibitor, while the quality of 
film productions themselves should reach a higher 
plane of achievement than heretofore. This will 
be the greatest year in every respect that the 
film industry has known." 

J. D. WILLIAMS, First National. 

Depression Will Affect Business 

I think the prospects for the coming year are 
not at all encouraging. 1 think everything indi- 
cates that we are passing on to a period of de- 
pression which will naturally affect all business in 
the United States, including those who provide 
entertainment. 

WM. A. BRADY, 
Prest. National Asso. 

Tough for Poor Pictures 

"It will be the greatest year for good pictures 
that the industry has ever known and the toughest 
vear for bad pictures. 

T. STUART BLACKTON. 
Likes His Organization 

Prospects for the coming year are great for 
Associated Producers. 

ALLAN DWAN. 
Most Auspicious 

The coming year. I think, promises to be most 
auspicious. We say this every year, but the 
Motion Picture Business opens up such a wonder- 
ful fertile field for improvements. Every year 
the nature and character of pictures becomes 
better, and I think that these improvements will 
continue. As has been so often said in the past, 
but which can be repeated again very emphati- 
cally, "the picture business is still in its infancy," 
in so far as results are concerned. 

J. E. BRULATOUR. 
Optimistic 
The future is always a closed book to human 
eyes, but I look forward with the utmost optim- 
ism to the opening of those pages. 

HIRAM ABRAMS, United Artists. 
Foreign Outlook a Feature 
The future looks very bright. The increase in 
the development of the domestic market and the 
recovery of the foreign market is bound to make 
a season of prosperity hitherto unprecedented in 
the motion picture business. 

C. C. BURR, Master Films. 
Expects Good Year 

"The industry will have fully as good a year as 
the past year has been, barring a short period 
during which there will probably be labor diffi- 
culties that may or may not assume national im- 
portance." 

H. O. SCHWALBE. First National. 
Sensible Exhibitors Policy 

The one and most significant tendency apparent 
in the motion picture buying market for the sea- 
son ofl920-1921, is the complete disregard of the 
sensible exhibitors of the country for the so- 
called sales policy of any of the motion picture 
producers or distributors. 

Both the first and subsequent run exhibitors of 
the United States are buying pictures now instead 
of policies. I don't tfiink there are SO exhibitors 
in the United States at this time who give a 
damn what any company's sales policy is. They 
are buying pictures on the basis of value, and 
they are ceasing to buy pictures that they have 
bought in past years that were without value or 
of questionable value. 

It is this commercial and mental independence 
of the exhibitors of the country that is going to 



keep the motion picture industry a "wide open 
industry" and block the plans of any individual, 
or any group of persons who feel that they can 
perfect an overwhelmingly dominant or monopol- 
istic organization. 

It makes little or no difference how many the- 
aters any one of the big producers organizations 
may buy in the United States. There isn't an 
organization in existence to-day that is producing 
solely within its own organization enough good 
pictures, or enough big pictures to make a chain 
of theaters owned by that organization convinc- 
ingly successful in a financial way. It is also a 
fact that one or two organizations who are try- 
ing to sustain theaters of their own exclusively 
with productions of their own, are starving their 
houses to death in enough cities to off-set the 
profits of certain of their other theaters where the 
natural advantages of location make those par- 
ticular units successful. F. B. WARREN. 
Need of Better Pictures 

From a study of the vast audiences at the Cap- 
itol Theater, one of the significant signs in the 
industry to me is the continued education of the 
public in the niceties of production. Their appre- 
ciation of the technical merits of direction and 
the wonders of photography, shown both by aud- 
ible comment and applause, speak volumes for the 
progress of the audiences in an understanding of 
the art. Their quickness to catch anachronisms 
and their impatience over slips of direction and 
inadequate handling of stories is surprising. These 
signs point the way to producers who would keep 
pace with popular education. "Class" is the word 
with which the fans conjure; the producers have 
taught the word and must maintain its meaning. 
Most producers understand this, because we are 
hearing so much of "fewer and better" pictures. 
The better they are made, the more reissues there 
will he and greater consequent profits on a pic- 
ture to the producer. 

MESSMORE KENDALL. 

Capitol Theater. 

Optimistic Influence From Various 
Causes Beneficial 

Increasing costs of production and distribution 
will continue to increase in arithmetical progres- 
sion. The exhibitor will continue to build larger 
and better theaters, his shows will continue to 
improve along artistic lines, film fans will in- 
crease in number and become more confirmed 
than ever in their attachment to motion pictures. 

GEO. KLEINE. 

Foresees Most Prosperous Season 

Successful as last season was, next year will be 
one of even greater prosperity for everybody in 
the motion picture industry. 

AL. LICHTMAN. 
Famous PlayersLasky. 

Never Better — and Why 

The prospects of the industry were never bet- 
ter than at the present moment. First, because 
photoplay producers have awakened to the fact 
that the public is a discriminating body — and 
growing more so all the while — but will attend 
the "movie" theater any time that the right sub- 
ject is intelligently presented ; and secondly, be- 
cause, as the industry grows, it increases its host 
of devotees and enthusiasts. 

The second condition referred to makes it prof- 
itable to produce better pictures and the first 
makes it imperative that producers who expect to 
remain in the business meet competition with bet- 
ter productions and entertainment value. There 
is nothing new in this condition. Old time theat- 
rical men had the same experience that "movie" 
managers are now enjoying. 

ROBERT W. PRIEST. 



217 



Frank Borzage 



COSMOPOLITAN PRODUCTIONS 

Director of 

"HUMORESQUE" 
"THE LOVE PIKER" 
"KINDRED OF THE DUST" 

mm 



Willis and Inglis Exclusive Representatives 



218 



Opportunity Never Greater 

For the sincere producer opportunity was never 
greater than now since quality production ap 
peals most strongly to the public which has dem- 
onstrated its appreciation of films intelligently 
produced and with really human characterizations. 

The outlook for 1920-21 is bright. 

THOMAS H. INCE. 

Keep Prices Down 

Good. Most other industries have already, at 
this writing, prepared for a curtailment in out- 
put. Bankers have restricted credit and expect a 
business purging sooner or later this year in the 
shape of an industrial panic. But all this to- 
gether with lower wages, less profits and , less 
indulgence should not affect a lew-priced amuse- 
ment — provided admission prices are kept low. 

The continued improvement in foreign exchange 
and foreign demand for pictures should greatly 
help — though on the other hand the American pro- 
ducer will find European competition continually 
increasing. 

We need most of all a revision of the present 
selling system so that rental burdens may be lifted 
from the small town house, and good pictures 
given greater circulation. 

Production will greatly improve. Picture value 
is most dependent upon themes. 

W. A. JOHNSON, 
Motion Picture News. 

Independent Producers' Opportunity 

Independent producers have a better chance to 
really develop the field with a greater recogni- 
tion of the fact that good story is essential and 
will go over. 

JOE BRANDT. 
Exceptionally Bright 

Prospects for a record breaking year of finan- 
cial success and artistic achievement in the pro- 
duction of moving pictures were never so rosy 
at any previous time in the history of moving 
pictures as they are today. There has been a 
steady increase in the number of people who have 
been converted to moving pictures as the most 
popular form of amusement, and exhibitors every- 
where have made money during the past two or 
three years. 

The era of prosperity which this country has 
enjoyed — high salaries and big wages has of 
course helped, and the outlook is exceptionally 
bright for the next year. 

CARL LAEMMLE. 
Tremendous Opportunity 

It will be one of tremendous prosperity for the 
industry in spite of the fact that there may be a 
depression in mercantile lines of business, as 
peoplr seek amusement in bad times as well as 
good. 

CHARLES R. ROGERS. 
Interesting 

Business very fine: stories more original and 
meaningful with more intellectual and spiritual 
situations as well as physical. 

D. W. GRIFFITH. 
Routine Films Will Go Begging 

The coming year will undoubtedly bring a 
greater appreciation of quality production with 
routine medicore films going begging in the mar- 
ket. 

GEORGE LOANE TUCKER. 
Viewed With Great Optimism 

Everything indicates that the season of 1 920-21 , 
will be the most successful and prosperous in his- 
tory of the motion picture business. 

The reason for this is three-fold : In the first 
place, the public throughout the world is coming 
more and more to see the vast possibilities of the 
motion picture and to rely upon it for their enter- 
tainment. The people want to sec the greatest 
plays and stories enacted on the screen, and be- 
cause of the great artistic advances being made 
in the production of photoplays, the screen is 



reaching out and attracting newer and more dis- 
criminating audiences. 

Because the public, by its attendance at such 
pictures as "The Miracle Man," "Humoresque," 
"Male and Female" and "Why Change Your 
Wife," has given evidence that it will support the 
best, producers have been encouraged to go to 
even greater lengths in bringing to the screen 
the very best that can be found in stories, direc- 
torial ability, casts, and settings. That this en- 
couragement has not been misdirected will be evi 
denced during the coming season by an unusual- 
ly large number of highclass productions. 

The third factor in the situation is the attitude 
of exhibitors. There are no better showmen any- 
where than the exhibitors of America, and they 
have been quick to meet the changing situation by 
giving more extended engagements for the better 
pictures. This not only has pleased their patrons 
and has made money for their theaters, but it also 
has encouraged producers to make pictures that 
will be worthy of long runs. 

Because of these factors, those who _ are in 
closest touch with the motion picture industry 
in its various ramifications look upon the new 
season with great optimism. 

ADOLPH ZUKOR. 

Of Unqualified Value 

One other reaction of note has made itself 
powerfully felt in the past year in the world of 
the motion picture — national prohibition. Regard- 
less of the merits or demerits of prohibition in 
other fields, it has been of tremendous value to 
the motion picture producer and exhibitor. With 
the passing of the saloon and, to a lesser extent, 
the cabaret, the public has turned in ever-increas- 
ing numbers to the photoplay theaters. 

The need for relaxation and entertainment is a 
universal one. Before the coming of prohibition 
there were many avenues of amusement beside the 
motion picture theater. Prohibition has closed 
these with the result that the world has turned 
more strongly than ever to its favorite amuse- 
ment — the motion picture. 

In this respect, it is interesting to note that 
family theater patronage has increased materially 
since prohibition went into effect. In other 
words, the family is a unit on the subject of 
amusement and it finds in the motion picture a 
form of entertainment which meets with the 
approval of every member of the family. 

Prohibition may have worked good or evil in 
other lines of industry. I am not prepared to 
pronounce judgment. But it has been of unqual- 
ified value to the motion picture industry. 

CECIL B. De MILLE. 

Bright 

Prospects for the coming year in a motion pic- 
ture way are bright. After-the-war readjustment 
is progressing fast. Unless there is a change for 
the worse in the international situation we may 
assume the peak of high prices has been passed. 

GEORGE BLAISDELL, 
Former Editor Moving Picture World. 

No Year Ever Promised More 

The prospects for the coming year to the Film 
Industry are splendid. With a greater popularity 
for pictures, themselves, with producers strain- 
ing every nerve to meet the big demand for big 
pictures, with the added influx of capital from 
many new sources, with the building of new pic- 
ture theaters everywhere, with the development of 
photography, with the erection of splendidly 
(•quipped studios at home and abroad, which will 
give more space to harried producers, a greater 
chance for elaborate interiors, and more varied 
exteriors with varied locals with the proper and 
lastly, but by no means least, with the great lit- 
erary geniuses of all countries turning their serious 
attention to the screen, no year ever promised 
more to the Industry, and to the public, than the 
year just dawning. 

EVE UNSE1 I 



219 



LLOYD INGRAHAM 



Director for 
MR. and MRS. CARTER DE HAVEN 

in 

"TWIN BEDS ' 



WILLIS and INGLIS, Exclusive Representatives 



220 



Barrell Skeptical 

Although the "leading lights" of the industry 
will brand me as a heretic for venturing the 
opinion, I make bold to state that motion pic- 
tures cannot He c'assed as vital necessities in the 
Eves of the people in the same sense that bread, 
butter, shoes, coal, gasoline and bungalows can. 
I Ins being the case, the present tendancy to raise 
rentals and admission charges all along the line — 
without a corresponding general rise in the 
quality of stories, acting, direction and presenta- 
tion of film productions — will shortly be met with 
a pronounced falling off in patronage. I do not 
base this statement on a wild assumption, but 
upon facts and observations gathered from a 
recent 8,000 mile trip from coast to coast in both 
the Dominion of Canada and the United States. 

With the exception of seven notable triumphs 
in the art of screen entertainment, the past twelve 
months has witnessed no improvement in the 
quality of American motion pictures whatsoever. 
The same old characters, the same old plots, the 
same old settings and the same old photographic 
and acting tricks have been hashed over week 
after week and month after month, with bore- 
some — almost nauseous — regularity. Griffith, 
Tucker, Marshall Neilan, Emerson and Loos, Fitz- 
maurice, Borzage and Von Stroheim have each 
contributed something brilliant and arresting *o 
our permanent shadow gallery, but heyond these, 
there is absolutely nothing new enough or unusual 
enough, or thrilling enough to distract a specta- 
tor's mind from a mosquito bite for five consec- 
utive minutes. 

The coming year, therefore, is bound to see 
either the closing of many theaters through a fail- 
ure to secure patronage at increased admission 
charges, or a great step forward in all branches 
of production which will revive the waning inter- 
est of the fans. 

I hope and believe that the latter movement will 
take place, but am skeptical of the sincerity and 
ab.lity of big stocking jobbing combinations to 
bring such a crusade into the New Jerusalem of 
actuality. 

CHARLES W. BARRELL. 
Ask a Different Question 

The great demand in the picture industry is for 
big worth-while productions. Despite the public's 
craze for pictures they have ceased to say, "let's 
go to a movie" . and now ask, "what is worth 
while seeing?" 

ALLEN HOLUBAR. 
A 14 to 1 Shot 

Prospects for the coming year are decidedly 
optimistic. Ergo. Last year I had one produc- 
tion to care for. This year I have 14, all organ- 
ized and developed upon the same methods as 
put over "Back to God's Country" so success- 
fully. Therefore, my answer is a 14 to 1 shot 
in favor of a successful 1921. 

ERNEST SHIPMAN. 

Talk, But Peters Out 

Prospects for the coming year as far as the 
independents are concerned, is an open question 
and very much debatable. The much talked of co- 
operation of independent Exhibitors and independ- 
ent exchange-men with independent producers and 
distributors seems to peter out in a lot. of talk. 
Nevertheless, we believe before the end of the en- 
suing year some very severe lessons by Exhibitor- 
Producers will have been administered to indepen- 
dents and they then will be fully awakened and 
not merely aroused. 

VICTOR KREMER. 
Outlook Most Prosperous 

"] believe the year of 1921 will prove the most 
prosperous the industry has ever known, basing 
this statement on the grounds that producers are 
looking forward to making nothing but the high 
est class of productions. This naturally will en 
courage the exhibitor to cater to his patrons on 
a higher plane. It also will encourage the build- 
ing of better theaters. We must not overlook the 
fact that it is from the exhibitor the industry must 
look to its financial success, for exhibitors are 
collectors of revenue and without the proper ve 



bicles as a medium to secure this revenue it would 
be impossible for producer and exhibitor to con- 
tinue in business. In the past year there has 
been a move by both exhibitors and producers to- 
work in a closer bond of harmony that is bound 
to result in benefit to both parties. The outlook 
for the coming year is better productions, theaters 
organizations and. a better feeling among the en 
tire industry." y R GRAINGER, 

Marshall Neilan Prod 
"Dubs Out" 

"The prospects are good for next year for the 
conservative, high type of exhibitor. A here will 
be a large percentage of ^uIr^cA") 

Big Possibilities 

The year 1920-21, holds out unprecedented 
money making possibilities both for the Producer 
and exhibitor of "worth while" pictures. Only 
the worth while k ^ F ^^ ou F nt FEISTj Goldwyn . 

Give Producer His Share 

Beyond all question, the raising of the prices 
of admittance in photoplay theaters is the most 
important fact affecting the motion picture 

m Everything hangs upon that. The whole fabric 
of the industry rests like an enormous and in- 
verted pyramid on the size of the coin that is 
slipped beneath the brass wicket as payment tor 
an admittance ticket. 

When the public, not only "stands for in 
advance in the price of picture entertainment, but 
actually approves it, and increases his visits, it 
is fair 'notice to the exhibitor that good pictures- 
better pictures— are demanded; that the day ot 
the ten-cent nickelodeon and wheezy calliope invi- 
tation will dawn no more, or, at best that it 
will dawn only on back streets and in the slums 
where once were found those hurdy-gurdy shows 
innocently tagged, "for men on y. The whole 
industry takes on renewed self-respect in tne 
face of the prices that the public is eager to pay 
for proper entertainment. The exhibitor ceases 
to be a janitor, and the producer is able to in- 
dulge his tendencies and tastes in more costly 
and elegant productions. 

Do not think, Mr. Exhibitor, that the Producer 
is a man to hoard his money. He is only too 
anxious to put his profits right back m new pro- 
ductions. That's why he is a producer and not 
a banker or a financier. If he were constituted 
differently he wouldn't be a producer. He is one 
just because of the possession of those gifts (it 
they are gifts), that lead him into artistic extrava- 
gancies. The producer — I mean the real pio- 
ducer — doesn't want money except as it is the 
measure of his artistic successes. He wa "ts 
fame, he wants art, he wants to express himself 
in the terms of a great motion picture appeal; he 
wants to do something just a little better than 
anybody else can do it. He chases a will o the 
wisp, not a dollar. Give him his honest share of 
the monev which, in the last analysis, he has 
earned by his creative gifts and judgment and 
watch how he will squander it — not in riotious 
living or gold mines, but in lavish productions 
that will mirror his esthetic moods and represent 
his ideals in an art that he loves. 

Name me a producer who is a millionaire by 
virtue of his earnings as a producer and I'll name 
you a hundred exhibitors in the millionaire class. 
By the time the producer has paid the money- 
lender for the use of capital to make a picture, 
costing anywhere from $150,000 to a quarter of a 
million or more (after the capitalist has tied him 
up with an ultimate mortgage on his mother's 
home), paid the distributor his split, the ex- 
hibitor his, and has satisfied the demands of 
printer, press, exploitation experts, not to men- 
tion the innumerable items of so called "overhead," 
he is lucky if there's a cup of coffe left as his 
share. Meanwhile, remember, please, that he's 
i the only one who has taken any chance. A 
couple of errors in judgment — a couple of "flops" 
— and he's through. The critics lament his pas- 
sing, and the public forgets him ; but the money- 



221 



Edward Sloman 

Director of 

"BURNING DAYLIGHT" and 

"MUTINY OF THE ELSINORE" 

By Jack London 



WILLIS AND INGLIS 
Exclusive Representatives 



222 



lender has got his money, the exhibitor has lost 
but a week's profits, or has suffered more likely 
nothing more than a diminution in his gains lor 
the single week, and that's the end of it with them. 
But we producers stake it all every time we put 
forth a big production. 

MACK SENNETT. 
Screen a Universal Education 

In my opinion, the impetus acquired during 'he 
last year cannot but gather increased force and 
I look for a steady, consistent advance in our 
industry during the year just ahead. 

The public, to a yet greater degree, will insist 
upon the very best pictures possible to produce, 
and, as in the past, the enterprising, far-seeing 
exhibitor will exert himself to satisfy the demand. 
More stars of the first magnitude will be devol- 
oped, g-eater productions will be presented, and 
more theaters of the first class will be built. The 
motion picture is rapidly nearing the point when 
it will truly fulfill its mission as the universal 
educator. 

ARTHUR S. KANE. 
A $ Mark Forecast 

"Weather forecast : Exceedingly fair : Steady 
$ho\vers$ in the locality of the box office. 

WATTERSON R. ROTHACKER. 

Once a Fan, Always One 

The coming year will prove to be the most 
prosperous that the industry has ever enjoyed, as 
more of the public are gradually getting to realize 
the great enjoyment offered at the moving picture 
theaters, and once a movie fan, always a movie 
fan. 

JACK WEINBERG, Canyon. 
Never Before Outlook So Bright 

Never before in the history of motion pictures 
has the outlook been so bright. It will undoubt- 
edly prove the most successful year for the pro- 
ducer since the inception of the photoplay, for 
never before has he had the opportunity to give 
his productions such time and effort as he will 
have in the immediate future. Everyone has come 
to realize that high-class screen entertainment can- 
not be ground out like shoes or lead pencils. 
With the conditions now evident. American pro- 
duction of films should witness its greatest strides 
forward during this year. The exhibitor also 
finds himself in a stronger position this year than 
ever before. He is no longer compelled to sign 
up a string of pictures to the exclusion of bet- 
ter subjects which may come along later on. He 
can pick and choose to an extent never before 
possible. 

MARSHALL NEILAN. 
Depend on Productions 

The prospects for the coming year will depend 
on the production of other good stories, well 
acted and directed. 

JOSEPH A. GOLDEN. 
Mastbaum Optimistic 

"I can see no reason now why everyone in any 
way identified with the motion picture industry 
should not feel optimistic over the prospects held 
out for producer, exhibitor and the public alike. 

"Picture exhibitors today may rightfully regard 
themselves as the axle upon which a great enter- 
tainment-seeking public is revolving. More than 
ever before the motion picture theater program 
is becoming restful and satisfying diversion and 
elevating and educational entertainment. It seems 
to me that the coming year will bring about the 
selection of the class of motion pictures which 
are most needed and consequently most wanted by 
the great multitudes ; pictures that embody char- 
acter, life and high ideals." 

JULES E. MASTBAUM. 

Will Be Noted for Its Uplift 

"We are now witnessing the crumbling of the 
las) vestiges of prejudice against the film; the 
praises of the film from the most orthodox, con- 
servative, lean-back obsoleters are sounding in 
our ears. The old time enemies of the film in the 



Upholders of traditions, culture and learning, ar> 
making obeisance to the screen and are vying with 
each other in their complimentary phrases. 

"This to me, is the last bend in that road which 
has been the way of the industry to reach its start- 
ing place! All that has come before has been the 
initiation of the novice; at last the full-fledged 
knight of the templar stands erect, all-knowing, 
confident and unafraid. 

"What has gone before, with the necessary ex- 
perimentation which has accompanied the naming 
of the most democratic idea in the history of the 
present civilization, — has been its own excuse. 
Many reminders and remnants will continue to 
cling' to the cloak of the knight for many years- 
hut they are only the fringe now — the real person- 
ality and soul of the screen has emerged. 

"It is now a fine privilege for the most idealis- 
tic of beings to be associated with the evolution 
of the greatest educational, cultural impetus of 
the universe. Hence, it is ever becoming more of 
an anomaly for rottenness, pettiness and stupidity 
to remain in the fold. The coming year will be 
noted for its uplifting work — for its reception of 
constructive, organized efforts to further streng- 
then the morale of the industry." __-„v 
CHARLES D. ISAACSON. 

Many Changes Coming 

"There will be a great many changes, particu 
larly in the production line. I feel that we have 
arrived at a point where the author has ami will 
come into his own, and I believe that the most 
important event in the past year is this recogni- 
tion of the author and his work. A good story 
will make more money regardless of the star, but 
the same cannot be said of a good star, hence I 
believe in the stand taken by many producers of 
buying the authors rather than ^the^stars/' GR j, y 

Not a Prophet 

"As for the outlook for the coming year, I am 
a poor prophet. Good pictures, backed by an ar- 
tistic program, always will do business. Only 
the producers can tell us what they are going to 
offer. And only the public can tell us whether 
the offering will be good. For, after all, 'the pic; 
ture is the thing' and the nublic is its best tudee 
B HUGO RIESENFELD. 

Prospects Exceptionally Bright 

"I believe the prospects for the coming year 
are exceptionally bright. A big field is open to 
independent producers. The dirge is sounding for 
the big companies who have large studios with 
fine equipment, famous authors, stars, and so on, 
for the reason that they make pictures too much 
on the factory order. Big photo-plays never come 
from these machine-like studios. This is why art- 
ists working alone will ^^c^^NEUR. 

The Financial Side 

"The most important event of the past year 
affecting our industry is the impregnable foothold 
we have taken in foreign moneys and the recogni- 
tion of foreign countries of the superiority of 
American made motion pictures to that of any 
other This event of itself permits the American 
producer to realize no less than one-half the cost 
of his production out of the foreign market per- 
mitting the domestic market to share less of the 

bur ' len " J. J. GOLDBURG. 

Frohman Amusement Corp. 

Most Prosperous Outlook 

"I think the coming season will be one of the 
most prosperous in the history of moviedom. I 
further think that 1920-21 wil see more good feat- 
ures released than any other time to date, as the 
producers realize that in order to market their 
product, it is necessary that their productions be 
of the highest possible class." & ^ THOMAS. 

The Prospects 

"As to the prospects for the coming year— I 
should say 'good for those who want to go for- 
ward, bad for stand-patters.'^^ MILLER- 



223 



JOSEPH DE GRASSE 

Director for 
CHARLES RAY 

in 

"45 Minutes from Broadway" 
"Nineteen and Phyllis" 

WILLIS [and INGLIS Exclusive Represen tatives 



IDA MAY | PARK 

Feature Director 



WILLIS and INGLIS Exclusive Representatives 



224 



1920 a Rainbow Year 

"No year, since the motion picture industry lias 
been in existence, looks so rosy for the exhibitor 
and producer, as the present one.' 

"Both producer and exhibitor have come to the 
realization that the public no longer is satisfied 
with fancy boxes and pretty ribbons to look at, 
but insist that the goods inside the box be up to 
their standard. In other words, they do not care 
who is in the picture, or who directed it, but in- 
sist that the picture itself be worthy to take up 
their valuable time. 

"Next year will see the complete metamorphoses 
of the motion picture productions, so far as sto- 
ries are concerned. That is my opinion, based on 
the following observations : First, stars who draw 
fabulous salaries no longer pack the theaters of 
this country, unless the stories thev appear in are 
consistently good. Second, so-called big stage 
successes for which tremendous sums of real money 
have been paid, have not proven screen successes. 
This also applies to novels by famous authors. 
What is the result of this condition? Producers 
realize that names count for nothing so far as the 
entertainment value is concerned, that as Shakes- 
peare said, 'The play's the thing,' and it is, and 
always will be. As an example consider "The 
Miracle Man." In my opinion the most important 
event in our industry the past season has been the 
great success of this photoplay. Unstinted praise 
should be given its director because he took a play 
that had been a financial failure on the stage, and 
made a story out of it so human and appealing 
that it has broken many records for receipts. 

"Next year will see many more successes just rs 
big if not bigger than "The Miracle Man." And 
they will be written by men and women who deem 
writing for the screen their life's work, not men 
who have won fame in other branches of amuse- 
ments, or the literary world ; but men and women 
who today are still unheard of. The day of the 
original screen writer is fast arriving, and produ- 
cers instead of paying big sums just for a name 
or reputation, will pav for stories on their merit." 

C. L. CHESTER. 

Immeasurable Good 

"Unquestionably prohibition has worked im- 
measurable good for the motion picture industry. 
The year 1920 will probably go down in history 
as the most prosperous in the motion picture 
business. A great measure of this prosperity must 
be attributed to the elimination of the saloon. A 
large percentage of the money spent in booze 
emporiums is now finding its way at the box 
office of motion picture theaters ; and it must be 
admitted that the world is a much better place to 
live in, because of it." 

J. I. SCHNITZER. 

Intensive Development and Extensive 
Expansion Expected 

"In an industry that has fairly leaped into pop- 
ularity in a few years, it is difficult to prognosti- 
cate even its immediate future. Whatever 1 may 
say on the possible trend of the motion picture is 
based on my personal observation of events of 
the past year, and colored, doubtlessly, by my 
prejudices and my desires. 

"In the production of the photoplay itself, I be- 
lieve we shall see an increasing attention paid to 
the details of every picture; an intensive plough- 
ing of those fields of picture making that have 
been avoided or slighted in the past. In a broad 
way, producers have been content heretofore, if 
their pictures have been strong in action. Char- 
acter drawing has been considered a secondary 
detail. But in several pictures that were pro- 
duced in the past year I have observed sincere at- 
tempts to do on the screen what the novelist does 
with words; that is. to present such details of a 
character as will make a person an individual 
rather than a type. This has been accomplished 
in many ways, but usually through the introduc- 
tion of fleeting flashbacks shown with unusual 
lighting effects and often thru the use of the soft 
focus lens. There is no doubt in my mind that 
this close application of the production staff of 
the larger film companies to the nuances of photo- 
play making will result in the making of pictures 
that may knock unhesitatingly at the door of Art." 

GABRIEL L. HESS, Goldwyn. 



Watch Your Step 

"In my humble opinion the picture business had 
better watch its step during the coming year 
This is a business that cannot stand still; It must 
continually branch out in different directions and 
into different fields. . 

"I believe this year will see a great develop- 
ment in the so-called non-theatrical held. f ic- 
tures will be welcomed into the educational held 
and to some extent in churches and industrial 

P "The foreign situation presents some very se- 
rious questions which must be intelligently met 

"Censorship will be at the high water mark be- 
tween November, 1920, and June, 1921. We will 
be defeated in several states unless we get busy 
and equip ourselves to meet the situation. Thil 
cannot be done without a mutual understanding 
and a working arrangement with a national ex- 
hibitors' organization. 

"With the prohibition question out ot tne_ way 
pictures will furnish the most fertile field for 
salaried ref ° rme c r fj AS c pETTIJOHN, Selznick. 

More Circuits Coming 

The most important thing that is going to hap- 
pen is that more theaters will be grouped to- 
gether year after year and the Lord pity the ex- 
hibitor who is not in a circuit. 

Every one of the greater producers would wel- 
come getting around a table and have a full and 
complete arrangement to stop much of the foolish- 
ness in the picture market. 

As long as producers find that another pro- 
ducer can take their star player and get three 
hundred per cent, more for the picture just be- 
cause the star changed location, as long as ex- 
hibitors fall for the new bunk and don't stay with 
the regular producer who has given him a square 
deal, then every producer must take a piece out 
of the exhibitor to keep alive himself. 

I believe sincerely that every pne of the greater 
producers want to play the game fair, but the 
exhibitor is so fed up on slander and rot that he 
can't be helped, but he must be exploited. 

There is a great deal more business that we 
could all do if we had a bit of co-operation. 

A lot of exhibitors will lose their theaters and 
some of them should lose them because they don't 
run them right. 

Producing and exhibiting is hard work, and we 
have to be on our toes every minute, but after 
I had three interviews with every great producer 
and was shown some things I was glad to be an 
exhibitor and not a producer. 

About what we need most is for everybody to 
mind their own business and work, and all things 
will come that are good. 

FRANK J. REMBUSCH. 



Towns Booked from Exchange Centers 

Following will be found the number of cities and 
towns booked from various Exchange Centers of 
this country : 

Los Angeles 175 

San Francisco 218 

Seattle 476 

Vancouver B. C 280 

Denver 337 

Minneapolis 924 

Des Moines 899 

Dallas 731 

St. Louis 367 

Chicago 501 

Indianapolis 112 

Louisville 273 

New Orleans 229 

Cleveland 357 

Detroit 354 

Boston 819 

New York 562 

New Tersey 141 

Philadelphia 312 

Pittsburgh 116 

Washington. D. C 115 

Richmond, Va 698 

Montreal 295 

Total 9291 



225 



TOM SANTSCHI 



Featured by PA THE 



Willis and Inglis exclusive representatives 



226 



Most Important Event of the Year 

Answering the question, "What do you consider the most significant happening in the 
motion picture industry between September, 1919 and 1920?", producers, distributors 
and exhibitors express their opinions in the following pages. 



Pictures a Necessity 

The year now passing has been one of notable 
progress. It has been marked by a colossal ex- 
pansion, giving rise to problems never before 
faced and calling for a vastly increased financial 
outlay. The attitude of the exhibitors towards 
this situation seems to me the most impressive 
and important development of the period. They 
have shown foresight, broadmindedness and a 
spirit of enterprise which were in themselves guar- 
antees of success, and the results have completely 
vindicated their faith. 

The public, re-assured by the confidence of the 
exhibitors, as evidenced by their larger expendi- 
tures and the markedly greater returns, and at- 
tracted by the superior offerings presented, is 
giving the institution a measure of support which 
not even the most optimistic of the pioneers could 
have forseen. This year has, indeed, transferred 
motion pictures from the list of luxuries to the 
catalogue of necessities. They exist today not 
only because this is a profit-yielding business but 
also in response to a well-nigh universal demand 
ARTHUR S. KANE! 
Exhibitors Declaration of Independence 

The Exhibitors' declaration of Independence 
and their successful battle against "enstrangling 
alliances. 

WATTERSON R. ROTHACKER. 
Divorcing Producer-Exhibitor 

"Forgetting many minor matters, all of which 
have in their conjunctive assembling been of im- 
portance to the industry as a whole, I consider 
the steps taken to divorce the producer-exhibitor 
to be one ot the most vital matters identified with 
the business. By producer-exhibitor I mean those 
who essay to secure control of theaters for the 
exploitation of pictures made by their own par- 
ticular company. This has always been to my 
mind — and I am speaking, of course, as an ex- 
hibitor— for the Stanley Company of America is 
an exhibitor and not a producer — is an attempt to 
invade the field of the exhibitor and the latter has 
rebelled, or at least, resented the invasion. 

"When we take into consideration the fact that 
the supply of pictures of genuine merit does not 
b> ' ai ?y "leans meet the demand and that there is 
sufficient profit for the producer and distributor 
who limits his activities to these branches, one 
realizes that any efforts made to discourage such 
practices must and have met with the approval 
of the vast majority of exhibitors throughout die 
entire country. The objections are reasonable and 
must, perforce, broaden as the injustice of the 
practice becomes more widespread, as it threat- 
ens to do." 

JULES E. MASTBAUM. 
Production of Jekyll-Hyde 

"To me. as an exhibitor, the most important 
event of the past motion picture year was the pro- 
duction by Paramount of 'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. 
Hyde,' in which John Barrymore gave the world 
a revelation of what motion picture acting can be. 
It set a standard, paved the way for other great 
actors to try their hands at being mimes. The 
tradition, held by many who ought to know better, 
that the legitimate stage could not provide act- 
ors for the screen, was smashed by this one pic- 
ture. It proved that a great actor was a great 
mime, that real stage talent could not only be a 
great mime, that real stage talent could not only 
be reflected on the screen, but also was appreci- 
ated by devotees of the silent art. 

"From other angles other happenings may seem 
more important than Mr. Barrymore's great pic- 
ture. Construction of new theaters, reorganiza- 
tions, color processes, all these may seem more 
important to others, but to me, because of my 
belief that 'the picture is the thing' and that real 



acting, not stage effects, makes the picture, there 
is nothing quite so worth while as 'Dr. Jekyll and 
Mr. Hyde.' " 

HUGO RIESENFELD. 
Forming of Asso. Prod. 

"In my opinion the most important event of the 
year was the forming of Associated Producers. 
Never in the history of the industry lias such a 
number of prominent men been brought together 
for the purpose of making big productions. They 
release in the same organization, but are produc- 
ing independently and alone." 

MAURICE TOURNEUR. 
The Cleveland Exhibitors' Convention 

"In my opinion, the most important event of 
the past year affecting the motion picture industry 
was the Exhibitors' Convention at Cleveland, Ohio. 
From the foundation laid at this convention, a 
potent organization will evolve whose influence in 
the coming years will be a power in this indus- 
try." 

J. I. SCHNITZER. 
Censorship a Detriment to Production 

"Many splendid pictures have had to run the 
gauntlet of so-called protectors of the public 
morals who have placed themselves in the I-am- 
better-than-thou attitude toward the public and 
have erected themselves into pseudo boards of 
censors. Perhaps all censorship of morals is 
based on the prurient searchings of minds with 
little appreciation of beauty. This is my per- 
sonal opinion ; and from my observation of the 
way in which legally appointed censors operate, 
I believe my judgment has been verified. I have 
often seen beautiful photoplays slashed of their 
beauty and cut to conform to puritanical and 
autocratic formulae. These guardians of public 
morals do not seem to realize that photoplays 
produced solely for their salacious appeal cannot 
succeed. The public mind is clean ; and it rejects 
filth automatically. Motion picture audiences are 
composed of families, not rounders. Those who 
believe the motion picture producer is inherently 
vicious and consequently in need of a guardian 
for his morals, have little knowledge of the men- 
tal makeup and ethical opinions of the millions 
of women and men who support the motion pic- 
ture theater with the steady appreciation of their 
attendance. 

"The past year has seen the replacement of small 
theaters by larger ones ; it has meant the erection 
of innumerable houses built solely for their possi- 
bilities as motion picture theaters, despite the 
dearth of building materials. And the remarkable 
part of this expansion in interest that the motion 
picture has developed, is seen in the crowds that 
stand in line outside every motion picture theater 
every evening. 

"The increase in the popularity of the photoplay 
is not limited to America alone; for in England, 
France, Germany and Scandinavia, theaters de- 
voted exclusively to the motion picture are being 
erected in proportionately larger numbers even 
than in America. Furthermore, it is interesting 
to observe that the sale of American photoplays 
abroad is continuing. 

"Producers abroad are studying the American 
feature picture with a view to absorbing the large 
number of technical improvements that America 
has imparted to the photoplay during the war pe- 
riod in which we alone were able to continue our 
normal production of pictures. 

"While I do not look for a large importation 
of foreign films this year, I believe that the time 
will come when we . shall exchange films with 
other countries ; for the motion picture is a splen- 
did medium through which one nation may learn 
how another lives. And I firmly believe that the 
motion picture is destined to play an important 
role in the cementing of international relations." 

GABRIEL L. HESS, Goldwyn. 



227 



MILDRED DAVIS 



Leads with Harold Lloyd 



WILLIS & INGLIS 

Exclusive representatives 



228 



Sees Greater Progress 

"It cannot be gainsaid but that the coming year 
will see more radical changes and greater prog- 
ress and prosperity for every branch of the mo- 
tion picture industry than has occurred at any 
time in its previous history." 

J. J. GOLDBURG, 
Frohman Amus emen t Corp. 

Independent Movement 

"The independent movement — of both director 
and exhibitor." 

ASHLEY MILLER. 
Recognition by Congress 

"The most important event of the past year 
affecting our industry was the recognition which 
the motion picture industry received when it was 
asked by a joint resolution of both Houses of 
Congress to lead the fight in America for Ameri- 
canism." 

CHAS. C. PETTIJOHN, Selznick. 
Longer Runs 

"The most important event of the past year 
for our industry was, I believe, the decision of 
the exhibitors to forget that their policy to have 
a stipulated number of changes at their theaters, 
at regular stated intervals, was absolutely neces- 
sary to their success ; and the exhibitors' Kberal- 
mindedness in giving better pictures longer runs 
will, of course, tend to encourage better produc- 
tions and discourage a great many inferior pic- 
tures now being marketed." 

H. O. SCHWALBE, First National. 

The Franchise Plan 

"Tn my opinion, the franchise plan is the most 
important factor that has been launched in the 
motion picture industry during this year. It is 
the factor that will exercise the greatest influ- 
ence for good throughout the exhibiting field dur- 
ing the coming year. The franchise insures 
strength, unity and cooperation for the exhibitor 
and a degree of success which it has not hereto- 
fore been possible for him to attain. Also, fran- 
chises will enable the exhibitors as a whole to 
give the producers enough money to safeguard 
their interest, and guarantee practically the con- 
tinuous production of such quality of pictures as 
will make possible the natural progress the ambi- 
tious producer desires." 

J. D. WILLIAMS, First National 

Spirit of Independence 

"The most important event in the past year in 
my opinion is the spirit of independence shown in 
all units of the motion picture business. This in- 
dustry must be based on equality for all, and each 
unit should stand independent of the other, all 
working towards the same goal — success." 

J. R. GRAINGER, 
Marshall Neilan Prod. 

Percentage and Combinations 

"The most important event of last year was 
the percentage plan of booking, and the various 
combinations developed." 

E. V. RICHARDS ("Rich.") 
Attitude of Authors 

The most important event of the past year af- 
fecting our industry has been the recognition 
that producers have received from the greatest 
literary minds of the world, who, during the past 
season have contributed generously to their works 
for film visualization. 

FELIX F. FEIST, Goldwyn. 
Intelligent Exhibitor Movement Big 
Event 

The widespread exhibitor movement along 
intelligent and progressive lines that marked rhe 
year just past, stands out as one of the most 
important influences the industry has known in 
a long time. I am referring to the progress 
made all along the line toward a better under- 
standing between producers and exhibitors and 
even among exhibitors themselves. 

A fine spirit has prevaded the industry and a 
disposition has been manifest to get together and 
settle differences on an equitable basis. Willing- 
ness is being displayed on every hand to under- 
stand the other man's viewpoint and to arrive at 
a sound working basis. 

J. S. WOODY, Realart. 



Foreign Development 

The foreign development in production and 
exhibition. 

D. W. GRIFFITH. 
Will Prove of Great Advantage 

There seems little doubt but that the effect of 
prohibition will prove of great advantage to the 
business. In practically all the districts where 
prohibition has gone into effect business in gen- 
eral is found to take on a more healthy appear- 
ance and merchants experience an increase in 
sales. The saloon has always more or less been 
competition to the motion picture theater. With 
the former "poor man's club" extinct, the motion 
picture theater will receive its share of the benefit 
following the wake of prohibition enforcement. 

MARSHALL NEILAN. 

Exhibitors Stand Against Producers 

The firm stand taken by the exhibitors all 
through the country against the exhibitor-pro- 
ducers. 

JACK WEINBERG, Canyon. 

Entry of Wall St. in Business 

The entry on a large scale of the big financial 
interests with their consequent effort to control 
both the producing and distributing ends of the 
business. 

CHARLES W. BARRELL. 

Failure of Monopoly 

The failure of any one company or any one 
combine to control the picture industry and the 
healthy survival of the independent producer and 
open looking. 

ALLEN HOLUBAR. 
Discrimination 

The most important event of the last year was, 
in my opinion, the awakening of the public to a 
point of discrimination between the studio man- 
ufactured, routine program stuff, and the big 
productions upon which the director and his 
associates specialized. This discernment has 
encouraged the investment of sufficient funds to 
make the kind of pictures which have advanced 
this industry to a point of almost unbelieveable 
artistry. 

ERNEST SH1PMAN. 
Cleveland Convention 

The conrention held at Cleveland, despite the 
fact that materialization of the ideas there pre- 
sented have not as yet been accomplished. 

VICTOR KREMER. 
No Outstanding Happening 

No one happening seems to me to be outstand- 
ing. Various productions of exceptional merit, 
the erection of elaborate theaters in various parts 
of the country, have had a prime influence upon 
the welfare of the industry. 

GEO. KLEINE. 
Prevalence of Long Runs 

The most important development in the indus- 
try during the past season was the thorough es- 
tablishment of the merit system of booking pic- 
tures. By this I mean the realization by exhib- 
itors that good pictures should be kept on their 
screens just so long as they attract the public. 
During the past season there has been a great 
increase in the number of houses playing pic- 
tures for long runs, instead of on the old policy 
of changing their bills daily, semi-weekly or week- 
ly, regardless of the drawing power of their at- 
tractions. In most of the leading theaters of the 
country the best pictures are now booked for 
indefinite engagements. 

AL. LICHTMAN, 
Famous Players-Lasky. 

Warren's Guess 

My guess as to the prospects for the coming 
year would be — that the producers who make very 
big pictures are going to be extremely successful, 
and those producers who make average pictures 
are going to be extremely unsuccessful. 

F. B. WARREN. 
Dwan's Idea 

Most important event of past year organization 
of Associated Producers. 

ALLAN DWAN. 



229 



GEORGE L. COX 

Member M. P. D. A. 

Directing All-Star Specials 
RECENT RELEASES 

"THE 30th PIECE OF SILVER" 
"WHISPERING SMITH" "THE HOUSE OF TOYS" 

"THEIR MUTUAL CHILD" "THE APPOINTED HOUR" 

"THE BLUE MOON" "THE WEEK END" 

WILLIS and INGLIS, Personal Representatives 



230 



Censorship Opposition Moderating 

liie important developments of the vear have 
neen a noticeable moderation throughout the 

Rovernment tiLtf*"** °J m ™°**. State and 
government officials regarding consorship and the 

oT P p r r 0 ortio t ns m qUa " ty ^ » £-8 

T- STUART BLACKTON. 
Lifting of Ban on Films 

in/ th P m ?nd, Im t POr,ant o{ the P ast >' ear Meet- 

ing the industry was perhaps the lifting of bans 
on films, and trade blockades, in foreign countries 
attendant upon the establishment of peace 
nyr . I- „ EVE UXSELL. 

Most Important Event Did Not Happen 

l he most important event that could have 
happened this year (the completion of the Pat 
terson Movement) DID NOT HAPPEN 

the inrlncf ' tS ye3rS ° f Very aCt ' Ve ' in 

the industry, I cannot see that we are any more 
staple then we were at the start * 
\Ve still live on B & B (bull and bunk) 

of „sW° P ' CtU f e is of,en Sreat. not because 
of us but in spite of us who are in it 

„„!f r0 K ,° erS a ?- d Exhibit °rs still stand with a 

o^er'anreTch^oth^ ^ "» d ^ at 

Exhibitors want to produce and Producers ex- 

they m „« in ™H "' a f ° te " I ,roducers what 
hat h" P ?. " d v,ce versa - Jt wa * my hope 
hat the Patterson movement would bring each 
branch to the realization that each should fpedal 
lze and not monopolize. special 

[ess wiJw." A™ " 0t S i I ! Cere With each other much 
less with producers. Also vice versa. 

FRANK J. REMBUSCH 

Important to the Producer 

it s'Sr ke°s me ^ the fisCaI year J ust P««d. 

it strikes me that the most important movement 
manifested by the motion picture industry is th* 
gradual dissolution of the "program" and he 

en,"'" 6 f .- He P T rognm " P r ° d "cer to indepei. 
den production. Important in three ways: first 

I / p . r , od " cer ' because he will be able to go 
m the I the ,! yPe u° f P roducti °" that he choose^ 

n the manner he chooses: secondly, to the public 

^M aUS s e " W ; 1 ' - get the Special Productions P care' 
fu ly screened, in contrast with the regular, and 

and e "be h ne dH P H r0gram P ! C \ UrC: third1 ^ a " d asthr. 
ftnr „l d f d v. Vltally of a ". to th e exhib- 

itor who will be able to select the worth while 
Pictures, and discard the trite stories which hither: 

loo h ) a fe e at P ' Ved SU u ch 3 Sad part in undermining 
good features on the same "program " 

Prohibition may be frowned upon my many but 
he exhibitor should be the last man in the world 
by °iTs\T h [ h s e EighteentH Ame "dment, profiting 
* , . r „ . THOMAS H. INCE. 
Awakening of Prominent English Writers 

It has long been a prophecy of ours that the day 
would come when men or recognized standing in 
he world of letters would voluntarily turn to 
he motion picture, realizing the possibilities of 
this newer form of dramatic expression and seek- 
ing a real knowledge of screen technique 

, viT\" ,a i the ? reatest sin 8' e event the 
f" .^f be ™ the avowal of a number of 

famous British men of letters of their intention of 
ario^wri&s ^ St ^ S 35 stud ent seen- 

Such men as Sir James M. Barrie. Arnold Hen- 

"\r.h„r U °T hert HlC i' e ?- s ' Edward Knoblach, Henry 
Arthur Tones and Compton Mackenzie have vol 
unteered to study scenario construction and pro- 
<lu.ct.on methods with a view of ultimately writmg 
original material for the screen "ruing 
This is not the first time in the history of the 
motion picture that famous literary figures have 
written for the screen. But it is the first time 
a men of this standing have come to apprec Zl 
hat photoplay writing is a separate a,„| distinct 
form of dramatic art and that to do work of 
real quality, ,t is necessary to studv methods and 

rucn'ire'of S ,'n UC, ' 0n MSt !! * ey °»« 
structure of the novel or the stage play. 

Just as this attitude on the part of the British 

writers has been the greatest single event of the 



past year, so the results of their study and lit- 
erary efforts are destined to be the outstanding 
feature of the future screen productions. With 
the mastery of a new literary technique achieved, 
we may look for screen plays of tremendous 
power and appeal; plays that will take rank with 
the great dramas of stage literature; plays that 
will far transcend the best of past screen efforts 
and which will speak to the hearts and minds ot 
the millions as no stage or screen play of the 
past has done and as no novel can hope to speaK. 

CECIL B. De MILLE. 
"The Miracle Man" 

The success of the "Miracle Man." This pic- 
ture proves, conclusively that an ulimited success 
may be obtained by the producer who puts out a 
simple, heart-appealing, comprehensive film, with- 
out resorting to railroad wrecks, or other thrills 
of a similar nature. The "Miracle Man" was, 
I think, the best object lesson for producers. It 
has opened up a new era of possibilities of which 
the producer was hardly aware. 

J. E. BRULATOUR. 

The Value of Quality Appreciated 

The definite establishment of quality of produc- 
tion is more essential than individual player per- 
sonality and the broadening of the vision of ex- 
hibitors, who are beginning to play worth while 
films for long runs, instead of changing programs 
automatically, because they always had changed 
at certain intervals — in other words, motion pic- 
tures have become legitimate entertainment and 
are being produced and shown according to the 
essential principles that have always governed 
the theater. 

GEORGE LOANE TUCKER. 
Independence of Producers 

In an industry as big and far rta as o'ir- 

it is almost impossible to put your fingers on one 
event and name it the most important single 
occurence of the year. We are too close to these 
events and therefore lack the perspective which 
gives them their true importance in the general 
scheme of affairs. I believe, however, that the 
continued movement toward independence on the 
part of producers will have most far reaching 
results. This tendency is a cont nua 01 ot t e 
movement that began a year ago, and to my 
mind, is a guarantee of the future stability of the 
motion picture business. 

HIRAM ABRAMS, United Artists. 
Beneficial 

The greatest step forward in motion picture 
production in the last year has been the tendency 
toward all-star casts in preference to the star 
system. This means that the director can assem- 
ble a well balanced group of players to portray 
stories in their proper proportions. The star 
system has a tendency to warp the plot. I saw 
recently a picture which consisted of almost noth- 
ing except poses by the star and numerous titles. 
The public is demanding more attention to the 
fundamental principles of drama and more even 
performances. It is a healthy sign. Looking into 
the future I see more stress put on photoplays of 
great appealing themes that will stir the mind and 
quicken the heart. We shall and must produce 
pictures with a big thought or a spiritual message. 
Our goal should be to project on the screen 
cross-sections of human life. 

REGINALD BARKER. 

Appreciation of Character Studies 

The recognition by exhibitors and film execu- 
tives of the tremendously important fact that the 
public really appreciates themes and character 
studies in motion pictures in preference to just 
action. 

LOIS WEBER. 
Tired of Twaddle 

The greatest series of events as relating to the 
motion picture industry during the past year is 
the failure of stage producers to keep up the 
standard of something new and successful. Pic- 
ture producers have far surpassed them in cre- 
ating new and artistic things. I am tirea of tne 
ceaseless twaddle about moving pictures ruining 
the stage. 

AL. CHRISTIE. 



231 



WILLIS & INGLIS 

Motion Didures and 
Theatrical Enterprises 

LOS ANGELES 
■ 



Separate Department to meet every 
need of the Producer, Manager, 
Director or Artist. 

Every department headed by an expert 



232 



Controversy Settled 

Writing in the middle of August, it seems a 
simpler matter to estimate what may be con- 
tained in the coming year for the motion picture 
than would have been possible a fortnight ago. 
Perhaps the chief disturbing business factor dur- 
ing the past twelve months has been the pro- 
ducer-exhibitor controversy, in the centre of 
which has been one large organization. The agree- 
ment just signed by this company and the rep- 
resentatives of the national exhibitors' body 
forecasts a lessening of the agitation that for 
many days has disturbed all branches of the 
business. 

GEORGE BLAISDELL, 
Former Editor Moving Picture World. 

Industry Being Commercialized Rapidly 

The important events the past year speak for 
themselves. The Motion Picture industry for the 
first time in its history is being rapidly commer- 
cialized, which automatically will compel close co- 
operation in the various branches of the business. 
This will be much more apparent in the summer 
of 1921, than at the present time. 

ALFRED S. BLACK. 

Big Pictures and Long Runs 

The most important development in the motion 
picture industry during 1919-20, was the large 
number of really big pictures and the readiness of 
exhibitors to show them for extended engagements. 

These two factors have worked together. The 
eagerness of producers to invest their best re- 
sources in big productions have encouraged ex- 
hibitors to give these pictures long runs; and. by 
the same token, the readiness of exhibitors to keep 
these pictures on their screens as long as they 
will attract the public has shown producers that 
their efforts are not being wasted. 

In other words, producers and exhibitors are 
working in harmony to advance the artistic excel- 
lence of the photoplay, and the results of this de- 
velopment will rebound to the benefit of pro- 
ducer, exhibitor and the general public. 

ADOLPH ZUKOR. 



Day of Independent Producer 

The antagonism developed by the attempt of 
the producer-distributors to acquire theaters and 
the exhibitors entire time, brought about the 
condition that enabled the independent producer 
to grasp resources and turn out pictures that 
compare favorably or excell those of the mon- 
opolist and this places a product at the disposal 
of the exhibitor with which he can compete with- 
out any fear of extinction. This means the 
encouragement of the creative minds developed 
by our business and to my mind is a far greater 
event in the year past, than prohibition which 
undoubtedly has done much to swell the coffers 
of our industry. 

The wise exhibitor will book every meritorious 
independent production out of a strict sense of 
duty, in addition to the box office reason, since it 
means freedom from the yoke of the producer- 
distributors, which for a time threatened to stifle 
competition, throttle creative genius, as well as 
threaten the very life blood of the exhibitors 
business. 

In the latter part of the year we have seen the 
big theaters spring up faster than the 'store shows' 
sprung up in the mushroom days when the pic- 
ture business started. The demand has exceedeil 
the supply and over production has become under- 
production until the industry has weathered one 
of the greatest retrenchment periods in the history 
of finance with hardly an exception. 

The conservative element lately introduced into 
our business while undoubtedly moving accord- 
ing to the best principals and practices of busi- 
ness failed to capitalize their opportunity and 
retrenched on their productions leaving the mar- 
ket wide open for the independent producer. 

C. C. BURR, 
Master Films. 

The breaking away from program organization 
by the many stars and directors with a consequent 
improvement ni production. The organization of 
the Motion Picture Theater Owners Asso. 

The decision of exhibitors — united in a strong 
organization — to break away from theater — own- 
ing rpoducers and buy pictures in the open 
market. 

CARL LAEMMLE. 



What of Prohibition? 



Unanimous expressions, barring a few, that closing of saloons will work to the ultimate 
profit of exhibitors — Some interesting and unique ideas. 



Regardless of one's personal opinions on the 
merits of prohibition, the effect of it on the in- 
dustry has been most beneficial. This country 
has been more or less dry now for a year. Dur- 
ing that time exhibitors have seen their box-office 
receipts increase in a way that can only be traced 
to the effects of prohibition. And this will con- 
tinue to grow. 

AL. LICHTMAN, 
Famous Players- Lasky. 

Priest's Interesting Thought 

The first thing that impressed me «was that 
producers had to make better pictures to entice 
a sober man into a theater than they had to at- 
tract the chap who felt happy because he had a 
few high-balls under his belt. A "happy" fellow 
will laugh at and applaud anything, whereas a 
sober man is more discriminating and demands 
more intelligent entertainment than he would if 
he had his cup that cheers. 

Better pictures brought better people to the 
theater and added to the receipts because the 
newer element was an addition to the old cli- 
entele. 

Prohibition has done one great thing for the in- 
dustry — it is the trumpet that roused the dead 
and made the quick to see the unlimited oppor- 
tunities. 

ROBERT W. PRIEST. 



A Natural Result 

It follows as a matter of course that the saloon 
frequently found on each of four corners, and each 
saloon primarily dependent for its support on its 
respective block, are no longer draining from the 
material welfare of the neighborhood ; and thus 
are millions of dollars released for better food, 
better clothes, better homes and many other ben- 
eficial economic and social purposes, not the least 
of which is the motion picture theater. The 
entire industry is receiving and will continue to 
receive its full share. 

WALTER W. IRWIN. 
Heart-Felt Applause 

Prohibition has undoubtedly greatly increased 
the attendance at motion picture theaters and 
also strangely enough has brought about the 
unique situation of reminiscent and heart-felt ap- 
plause from the audience whenever a man is 
seen to take a drink — on the screen. 

J. STUART B LAC ETON'. 

Gained What Liquor Folks Lost 

The result of prohibition upon the film industry 
seems to be an increase in attendance at the mo- 
tion picture houses which have gained, as have 
the grocery and clothing houses, what the liquor 
houses have lost. 

EVE UNSELL. 



233 



Hamilton -White Comedies 

Produced by 

Lloyd Hamilton and Jack White 




Lloyd Hamilton 
"HAM" 



Releases 
"A FRESH START" 
"DUCK IN" 
"NONSENSE" 
"DYNAMITE" 



ASTRA STUDIOS GLENDALE, CALIFORNIA 



234 



Affects Actors 

Result of prohibition is bad. Too many actors 
growing walloweyed staying up nights working 
in their private stills. 

_ . ALLAN DWAN. 

Enforcement of Prohibition Law 

The enforcement of the prohibition law, of 
course, is the most important happening of the 
year, and will surely help the motion picture in- 
dustry. The motion picture theaters will natur- 
ally take the place of the saloon, and the family 
man will gradually drift into the habit of going 
to motion pictures and spend the time in our 
theaters that he formerly spent in saloons and 
small clubs. I should advise care in all theatrical 
investments. My long experience has taught me 
that if a slump comes the theater is the first to 
feel the result of it, and the last to reap the 
benefit of the recoming of prosperity. 

WM. A. URADY, 
Prest. National Asso. 

Prohibition Beneficial 

I have no particular data upon which to base 
an opinion, but believe that prohibition has been 
extremely beneficial. 

GEO. KLEINE. 
Makes for Family Pleasure 

"Without the slightest hesitation I say most 
emphatically that it has been decidedly beneficial, 
not only from a monetary viewpoint but socio- 
logically as well. By the latter I mean that there 
has been brought about a more sociability among 
patrons of the silent drama. As an illustration : 
Before prohibition went into effect it was rather 
unusual to see whole families attending the pic- 
ture houses. Children, of course, were there in 
large numbers and quite often, especially in the 
evenings, they were accompanied by their mothers 
or adult relatives. But rarely did the paternal 
representative of the family grace the theaters by 
his presence. Today men, as a rule, devote more 
time to the home and as a diversion — a sort of 
substitute for the chat with friends at the thirst 
emporiums, they take their wives and children to 
see the 'movies,' as many call the motion pictures. 
This I regard as one of the most glorious results 
of the arid condition that now exists. This con- 
dition is the more noticeable, of course, in the 
neighborhood houses which have increased their 
revenue materially because of the change." 

JULES E. MASTBAUM. 
Millions Into the Box Office 

"The result of prohibition will naturally have a 
great effect on the industry and it will turn many 
millions more into the box offices." 

JOHN W. GREY. 
Makes Tourneur Sad 

"As to prohibition, the exhibitors know more 
about it than I do. I hate to mention the sub- 
ject because it really makes me sad!" 

MAURTCE TOURNEUR. 
Results Plainly Evident 

"The result of prohibition upon the industry is 
so plain and evident that 'he who runs may read.' 
The elimination of those places where men and 
some women spent their leisure hours have turned 
perforce to the refuge of that other mental and 
physical stimulant, the motion picture, and the 
elimination of the corner saloon has added its 
proportion to the occupied seats of the neighbor- 
hood playhouse." 

J. J. GOLDBURG, 
Frohman Amusement Corp. 

Stop Roasting Prohibition 

"Whenever I see pictures making fun of pro- 
hibition, or actors roasting it on the stage, as is 
being done daily, I can't help but think : 'Why 
kill the goose that lays the golden egg?' There 
is no question to my mind but that prohibition 
is a Big Boom to show business, and while I am 
not a prohibitionist myself, I think the last people 
in the world to roast it should be movie and the- 
atrical people, for it has surely been a financial 
godsend to them.'' 

H. M. THOMAS. 
Prohibition Excellent 

"Excellent — in production it makes for effi- 
ciency — in the market end it turns booze money 
to better use." 

ASHLEY MILLER. 



The Other Fellow 

Prohibition ought to have a good effect. But 
how about the poor "guys" who used to go to 
the pictures with the idea that if the picture was 
very bad they could go out and get pickled and 
forget it? 

JOSEPH A. GOLDEN. 
Increased Receipts 35 Fer Cent 

"Prohibition has been oi.c oi the biggest booms 
for our industry, and while it has made our audi- 
ences more critical, it has increased receipts not 
less than 35 per cent." 

C. L. CHESTER. 
Former High Marks Will Be Passed 

"Prospects never were brighter. The progress 
made by the producer in the past must be con- 
tinued in the future. We must not permit out- 
selves to stop. The public has been educated up to 
the highest possible standard in the way of mo- 
tion picture production, and this standard must 
not alone be kept up, but it must be improved. 
Pictures of the type of 'The Miracle Man,' 'Eyes 
of Youth.' 'Humoresque,' 'Why Change Your 
Wife.' 'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,' 'Blind Hus- 
bands,' 'Virgin of Stamboul,' 'The Devil's Pass 
Key,' will be exceeded in the coming season. Mo- 
tion picture theaters with every possible comfort 
and convenience for the public are being built as 
rapidly as the preparation of materials will per- 
mit. The motion picture has long since passed 
the novelty stage — it must be considered as one of 
our permanent institutions, the same as the school 
or the church; it must be considered as a factor 
in the advancement of education and civilization. 
To me it looks as though past high marks and 
records will in the coming season be swept like 
chaff before the wind." 

J. I. SCHNITZER. 
Very Beneficial 

"The result of prohibition on our industry of 
course has been very beneficial to the industry in 
general." 

H. O. SCHWALBE. First National. 

A Decided Benefit 

"Prohibition, as I see it, has been the direct 
cause of largely increased attendance at motion 
picture theaters. The pay envelopes which pre 
viously were largely spent in saloons are now 
devoted to the family, with the result that these 
families now attend motion picture shows wh^re 
formerly they could not do so. The people who 
heretofore have sat around cafes and restaurants 
drinking socially may also be logically added to a 
certain percent of the increased attendance, so that 
on the whole prohibition has been a decided ben 
efit to the film business." 

J. D. WILLIAMS, First National. 

Has Brought Heavy Gains 

"I personally believe prohibition has helped our 
industry. People must have amusement of some 
kind and where thousands heretofore gained their 
pleasure from the saloon a large portion of this 
class now get their entertainment from the mo- 
tion picture theater. If I may be allowed to ex- 
press myself, I personally am against prohibition 
as I believe it interferes with the liberty of many 
people, and I do not believe one man has the right 
to dictate to the other as to his mode of living." 

J. R. GRAINGER, 
Marshall Neilan Pro ! 

Boom To Industry 

It is unnecessary to consider in detail the merits 
or demerits of the liquor question as a moral issue 
to recognize Prohibition as a boom to our in- 
dustry. A portion of the revenue formerly en- 
joyed by the cafe proprietor is coming to us, 
unquestionably. To view the situation in its 
broader aspect, a man may take his wife and 
children to the picture theater repeatedly at a 
smaller expense than had been involved by a 
single evening's quest of recreation for himself 
alone. The relaxation, not to say profit, which 
he receives now is of an infinitely more whole- 
some character and, moreover, is shared by the 
entire family. 

There is no doubt in my mind that the passing 
of the saloon means the continued stimulation of 
the picture industry. 

ARTHUR S. KANE. 



235 



WILLIAM F. ALDER 



Now in the Arctic. In charge 
of Expedition filming Animal 
Life in the Snow Bound North. 




Recently returned from New 
Guinea where he directed the 
filming of "Shipwrecked Among 
Cannibals." Recent Universal 
Special Release. 



Associated with Southern California 
Academy of Science 



Address: 



Care Wid' s Daily 
Hollywood, Calif. 



More From Prohibition 

Prohibition has done almost as much good in 
a financial way for our industry as it will ulti- 
mately do for the good of mankind. Its con- 
tribution in dollars and cents at the box offices 
of the exhibitors for the season just ending though 
great, is negligible, as compared to what I per- 
sonally believe will pour into the box offices of 
the exhibitors next year. 

Despite the great differences of opinion that 
seem to have existed during the past six months 
between certain great body of exhibitors and 
certain producers. 1 am firm in my belief that 
producers and exhibitors are closer today than 
they ever were before, and each has a clearer 
understanding of the other. Both have had 
experiences in the other fellow's field, which quite 
naturally has given both sides a more intimate 
knowledge of the workings, earnings, trials and 
tribulations. 

With knowledge comes understanding and with 
understanding comes belief. 

FELIX F. FEIST. Goldwyn. 

Wonderful for All 

Prohibition was a wonderful thing for all of 
us. 

E. V. RICHARDS ("Rich.") 

Big for Box Office 

Prohibition is perhaps the biggest thing for the 
box office that ever happened. Everybody can't 
go to Cuba, but everybody can go to the movies — 
and they are going to the movies. The sad demise 
of John Barleycorn is meaning millions for the 
exhibitors. 

WATTERSOX R. ROTHACKER. 
Saloonmen Become Exhibitors 

I believe that the abolition of the saloon has 
had a beneficial effect upon the amusement field 
as a whole. In many localities the ex-liquor 
dealers are entering the show business and seem 
to be doing exceptionally well by applying their 
well-known capacity for catering to the taste of 
people. Where they used to sell-day-dreams and 
forgetfulness in bottles, they are now supplying the 
same need with music, laughter, dancing and the 
Muttering faces on the silversheet. 

CHARLES W. BARRELL. 
An Immeasurable Good 

I believe prohibition to be an immeasurable 
good not only for our industry but for humanity. 

ALLEN HOLUBAR. 

A Change 

Prohibition has helped up : Before they went 
there to "sleep it off." Xow they go there to 
"forget." ERNEST SHIPMAX. 

Powerful Force 

It is our opinion that prohibition beyond a 
peradventure of a doubt, is a powerful force en- 
tirely beneficient to our industrv. 

VICTOR KREMER 

Auto vs. Saloon 

Prohibition has helped the motion picture busi- 
ness but it is hard to say whether the automobile 
has not taken as many away as drv days have 
FRAXK J. REM BUSCH 
Of Unqualified Value 

Prohibition may have worked good or evil in 
other lines of industry. I am not prepared to 
pronounce judgment. But' it has been of unqual- 
ified value to the motion picture industry. 

CECIL B. De MILLE. 
Beneficial 

Prohibition will prove most beneficial to the 
Industry. In fact the attendance at the the- 
aters already has proved this, as it has greatly 
increased since prohibition went into effect, and 
there is no doubt in my mind, that the attendance, 
because of prohibition will continue to increase. 

J. E. BRULATOUR. 
A New World Opened 

That part of the pay envelope which formerly 
went to the saloon-keeper and brought the wage 
earner home to his family a creature of selfish- 
ness and besoftedness, will now bring to the whole 
household a new and enlightening world. 

I.ois WEBER. 



Family Will Enjoy Saloon Money 

Prohibition will bring millions of dimes and 
quarters to the box office. The family at the 
films will enjoy the money which formerly went 
to the saloon. 

GEORGE LOAXE TUCKER. 
Wholesome 

Ignoring entirely and pro and con discussion of 
prohibition or the means by which it has been 
brought about, and looking at it soley from the 
standpoint of the motion picture industry, no one 
can question for a moment that it will have the 
most wholesome effect upon every phase of our 
endeavors. 

HIRAM ABRAMS, United Artists. 

Will Want Better Pictures 

I understand that prohibition has already in- 
creased the attendance at motion picture theaters. 
I think it safe to prophesy that this increase will 
continue. This added interest carries in its train 
critical and logical aspects on the part of the 
audiences which will demand better pictures. It 
may be said therefore, that the effect of prohibi- 
tion of motion pictures is beneficial. 

REGINALD BARKKK 

An Idea 

In the producing end, I should judge, those 
who want drinks still get them; and I have no 
accurate information from the exhibitor. 

D. W. GRIFFITH. 

Big Boom 

A big boom for the industry. 

CHARLES R. ROGERS. 

30 Per Cent. Increase 

There is no doubt in my mind that prohibition 
has increased motion picture theater attendance 
fully 30 per cent. JOE BRANDT. 

More Patrons, More Revenue 

Anything that prevents a waste of money and 
gives the people more leisure time is of benefit to 
the motion picture industry. Prohibition, by clos- 
ing saloons, has turned the attention of millions of 
men to motion picture theaters as a place of 
amusement. Because it is essentially a means of 
amusement for the entire family, the motion pic- 
ture has done more than any other agency to 
keep the family together. Men who formerly 
spent their evenings in saloons or clubs now take 
their families to the motion picture theaters. 
Consequently prohibition has brought the pictures 
more patrons, and. with more patrons, more 
revenue. 

ADOLPH ZUKOR. 
Business Improved Where Licenses 
Existed 

Prohibition in those places, only, that formerly 
had license, have improved the business 25 per 
cent., but comparatively small increase in those 
places formerly non-licensed. 

ALFRED S. BLACK. 

Quirk on Prohibition 

I am opposed to prohibition because of the 
drunkeness it causes. 

Since drinking has become an adventure by the 
thrill of risk and a slight spice of danger, mort 
people are drinking, and people are drinking more 
than ever before. 

Instead of the old fashioned bar, regulated by 
the law, and with the publicity that put a check 
on drunkeness, homes, offices and hotel rooms 
are now the drinking places, and liquor is dis- 
pensed at a whole-sale rate. 

All restrictions ha\*? been removed. Boys and 
girls in their 'teens may buy cheap whiskey by 
the quart, and drunkeness is on the increase. 

I am against prohibition because it has caused 
the increase of crime in our larger cities, and be- 
cause anything prohibited has an added lure. In 
stead of the before dinner drink, men and women 
now consume cheap whiskey in greater quantities, 
with all the dangers that go with a hidden vice. 

JAMES R. QUIRK. 

Photoplay. 



237 



To Motion Picture Exhibitors Everywhere 
WILLIAM FOX Presents 

SUCCESS AND PROFIT 

Through Branches Distributed Throughout the World 
UNITED STATES — FOX FILM CORPORATION 



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243 Golden Gate Ave. 



CANADA 
FOX FILM CORP., Ltd. 

CALGARY, ALBERTA 

Princess Theatre Bldg. 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 

21 Dundas St. E 
MONTREAL, QUEBEC 

322 St. Catherine St. W 
VANCOUVER. B. C. 

Leigh Spencer Bldg. 
ST. JOHN. N. B. 

162 Union St. 
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 

48 Aikins Bldg. 

SOUTH AMERICA 
FOX FILM CORP. 

Argentine 

BUENOS AIRES 

940 Lavalle 
ROSARIO 
Maipu, 753 

Uruguay 
MONTEVIDEO 
1439 Rio Negro 

Brazil 

RIO DE JANEIRO 

7 Rua Quitanda 
SAO PAULO 

Rua Santa Ephigenia, 77 



FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

UNITED KINGDOM 
FOX FILM CO., Ltd. 

LONDON, ENG. 
13 Berners St.— W. 1 

NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE, 
ENG. 

St. Nicholas Chambers 
(Amen Corner) 

CARDIFF, WALES 
9-9-A Wharton St. 

LIVERPOOL. ENG. 
15 Manchester St. 

LEEDS, ENG. 
29 Albion PI. 

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 
73 Dunlop St. 

MANCHESTER, ENG. 
Deansgate (Cor. St. Mary) 

BIRMINGHAM, ENG. 
1-3 Temple St., New St. 

DUBLIN, IRELAND 
201 Great Brunswick St. 



New Zealand 

WELLINGTON 
76-78 Jervois Quay 



CONTINENTAL EUROPE 
FOX FILM SOCIETE 
ANONYME (PARIS) 

PARIS 

24 Boulevard des Italiens 
(1 Rue Taitbout) 
LILLE 

12 Rue des Manneliers 
MARSEILLES 

58 Rue de Rome 
BORDEAUX 

40 Rue Poquelin Moliers 
STRASBOURG 

15 Rue du Vieux Marche 
Aux Vins 
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM 

60 Rue Pont Neuf, corner 
Boulevard du Nord 
LYON 

75 Rue de la Republique 
ALGIERS 

71 Rue d'Isly 

AUSTRALIA 
FOX FILM CORP. 
(Australasia) Limited 

SYDNEY 

305 Pitt Street 
MELBOURNE, VICTORIA 

Elizabeth House, Elizabeth 
and Little Collins Sts. 
BRISBANE 

Kodack Bldg. 



Agencies in Every Civilized Country in the World 

FOX FILM CORPORATION 

William Fox, President 
WEST FIFTY-FIFTH STREET NEW YORK, U. S. A. 



238 



The Foreign Market 

BY W. A. WILLIAMSON 
(London Representative of Wid's Daily ) 



The present situation is black, the future out- 
look is dark grey — there, in a nutshell, you have 
the conclusions that are forced upon one after a 
close survey of the foreign markets. For over- 
supply has brought about a very unsatisfactory 
state of affairs from the film manufacturers' point 
of view. 

Take England first. This country always will 
suffer from over-production. With our 4,000 odd 
theaters fed by British, American, Swedish, French, 
Italian, and, soonor or later, by German pro- 
ducers, this is inevitable. We cannot use even a 
selection of the pictures sent to us at anything 
like the rate at which they are being produced. 
Our theaters to-day are showing American sub- 
jects from two to five years out-of-date. We are 
losing ground rather than gaining it, and this 
after all the "flivvers" have been automatically 
squeezed out of the market. 

This being the state of the film market here 
the position of the British exhibitor is naturally 
unassailable. He can pick and choose his pic- 
tures, and — except in the case of super produc- 
tions for which there is keen competition — he keeps 
rental charges on the low side all the time. 

Today it is a difficult matter to dispose of a 
mediocre program feature at any price. The 
British exhibitor now looks more than ever at 
the box-office angle when booking a subject. He 
demands something that he can advertise — star, 
title, author, or otherwise a picture does not 
get by with him. 

The British exhibitor is dead against the block- 
booking of films. Past experience has taught 
him that it is courting disaster to book a picture 
unseen. Many films so booked in the past were 
laid on the shelf by exhibitors who preferred to 
go to the extra expense of running a substitute 
rather than exhibit a dud. 

The American manufacturer has also to face 
the competition of the British studios, and the 
output of British pictures is on the increase all 
the time. These productions are as yet far behind 
the best American subjects on all counts, but 
national sentiment puts them on a competitive 
level. There is a very large public for British 
productions, and their place in the market is 
firmly established. 

The exchange business in this country is spec- 
ulative to a degree, as it is hard to find a sub- 
ject that may be considered a safe bet. Clean- 
ups are few and far between. "Tarzan of the 
Apes" was one. "The Still Alarm" was another 
and "Back to God's Country" and "The Miracle 
Man" will be of that category, too. But "Broken 
Blossomsj" "Blind Husbands" and the Nazimova 
pictures, will not duplicate their American suc- 
cesses, although they are not failures in any sense 
of the word. 

The bulk of the business here comes to the 
exchanges through travellers, and manufacturers 
entering this market will be well advised to 
secure the services of the best men available. And 
manufacturers who can stand the initial outlay 
should not hesitate to establish their own ex- 
changes here rather than dispose of their output. 
Many good pictures have been badly handled in 
the past, and a concern giving proper exploita- 
tion service on American lines could do wonders 
in this market. 

For rental purposes these islands usually are 
divided as follows: London, South Coast and 
Home Countries, handled from London: Lanca- 
shire, Cheshire and North Wales, handled from 
Manchester: Yorkshire and four Xothern Coun- 
tries, handled from Leeds or Newcastle; Midlands, 
handled from Birmingham ; South Wales and West 
of England, handled from Cardiff; Scotland, 
handled from Glasgow or Edinburgh; Ireland, 
handled from Belfast or Dublin. 



New films are Trade Shown at these centers 
about eighteen months to two years before re- 
lease date and the verdict of the shows usually 
decide the fate of a film. Different films meet 
with different receptions in the various terri- 
tories. As a rule the audiences of the Northern 
centers are the most critical. 

To the American manufacturer who wishes to 
clean-up in this market I would say : Employ 
good travellers and send over your best exploita- 
tion and presentation experts, and you can't go 
far wrong. 

The Principal renting concerns in these Isles 
are : Film Booking Offices, Ltd., handling the 
Universal output ; Fox Film Co., Goldwyn ; Stall's, 
handling their own British made productions ; 
Jurys handling the Metro program; Walturdaw, 
handling the First National and Selznick ; Gau- 
mont, independent buyers of features ; Famous 
Lasky ; Vitagraph, General Film Renting, handl- 
ing Samuelson productions, Pathe, Phillips Film 
Independent buyers, and Ideal, handling their 
own productions and independent features. 

The principal producing companies are Stall's 
Gaumont, Alliance, Hepworth, George Clark Pro- 
ductions, Ideal, B. & C, Broadwest, Famous 
Lasky and Samuelson. 

Of the theater circuits, by far the most impor- 
tant is the Provincial Cinematograph Theaters, 
Ltd., with which Lord Beaverbrook is actively 
associated. This circuit controls a long chain of 
kinemas and has in addition options on a number 
of important sites throughout the country. Its 
ramifications will want close watching. Other 
important circuits are Associated Provincial Pic- 
ture Houses, an off shoot of P. C. T., Rio-Color 
Picture Houses, the Colline-Thompson Circuit, 
and B. B. Pictures. 

The ban on luxury building has greatly limited 
the erection of new kinemas for the time being, 
although a fair number of new houses will open 
this autumn. Many big theaters and halls too 
have gone over to the films. 

So much for England. Turning to the Con- 
tinent we find a state of affairs still less encour- 
aging. Here the theaters are not yet booked up 
so far ahead, but the congestion is bound to come 
in the near future. The kinemas are just fairly 
started again and there is a vast accumulation 
of stuff to be disposed of. And here theater build- 
ing is at a standstill. 

Another thing that operates against business on 
the Continent is the censorship. This differs so 
widely in the various countries that it is impos- 
sible to lay down any hard and fast rules, but 
consorship plays the very dickens with many a 
promising subject. 

By far the best market for American stuff to- 
day, although it is the most overcrowded, is 
Scandinavia. Here pictures that do well in 
America and England, particularly artistic pro- 
ductions, are pretty sure to make money. 

France at present offers very little market 
owing to the vast amount of stuff on band. This 
country contains few first-class theaters, judged 
even from the French standpoint. No new kine- 
mas have been built for some time, and future 
prospects are very nebulous. 

In Belgium business is better than in France, 
but this country only uses one print of a picture, 
unless the subject is exceptional. Even then the 
second print is merely taken as a safeguard in 
case of a mishap to the working copy. 

In Holland only one print is required. Here 
German pictures are preferred to American sub- 
jects, so the market is by no means good. 

Spain, which during the war was taking five 
prints of American films will how use only two 
or three. Italian films are most popular in this 
country, with German subjects second and 



239 



This is the Wonderful Face of 

GEORGE BEBAN 




Th ere s no two ways 
about it! 

GEORGE BEBAN 

is a wonderful actor 



Don't take my word 
for it, but take my 
tip and see him in his 
forthcoming feature. 



"One Man in a Million" 

—and be convinced 



11 When he laughs, the world 
laughs — when he weeps, the 
world weeps. Every emotion 
that he feels, yon feel — such 
is the magic of his talent.''' 




Address Communications to 

SOL L. LESSER 
634 H. W. Hellman Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



240 



American a had third. Italian anil German films 
are very much cheaper than American which 
accounts for this preference. The exchange busi- 
ness in Spain is very precarious, clue to low 
rental prices brought about by a combination of 
exhibitors, and the effects of over-supply. - 

In Italy the severe and expensive censorship, 
and the heavy duties and tax-es. have put all 
branches of trie trade, — exhibitors, producers and 
exchanges, in a very bad position. At the present 
time Italy is buying very few foreign films, with 
the exception of German subjects. The Germans 
are sending in some of the films they have ac- 
cumulated during the past few years, and they 
are renting these at whatever price they can get. 
The only American films that seem to find a 
ready market here are subjects of a spectacular 
nature, such as Western stories, which cannot suc- 
cessfully be made elsewhere. Pictures showing 
fine riding. Western cowboys, and althletic feats 
are what the Italians want. American comedy, 
whether slapstick or otherwise, does not seem to 
appeal to the Italians. 

Although the importation of films into Germany 
is prohibited, a certain number of pictures find 
their way into that country through the occupied 
territory. These are usually Western stories or 
very spectacular productions. American comedies 
do not go. It is expected that the German mar- 
ket will be open again this autumn. The Germans 
have just established a new censorship which will, 
doubtless, be very severe. 

For the film business, Austria. Hungary, and 
Czechoslavakia are treated together, as buyers 
for any one of these territories operate in the 
other two. These three countries are now over- 
crowded with films that have already seen ser- 
vice in France, Great Britain and Germany. It 
seems impossible for buyers to take new films and 
pay for the rights of using them in these countries, 
on account of the depreciated state of their cur- 
rency. The only exceptions are big spectacular 
stibjects or stunt films that have a strong box 
office angle. 

In the Balkans and the East, there is little or 
no business as here there are so few theaters, and 
many of the towns are without electric light. As 
a market for films these regions are not worth 
consideration. 

Taking the Continent as a whole, with the de- 
preciated condition of its coinage and the short- 
age of theaters, it does not look as if, from the 
American point of view, there is much hope of 
revenue from these countries. Most of them will 
no doubt use old films, or cheap stuff on a foot- 
age basis, for a long time to come. Until new 
theaters spring up there is little chance of any 
reel business being done. 

As regards suitable subjects for the Continent, 
Western stuff, stunt pictures and slapstick com- 



edies are acceptable nearly everywhere, and big 
spectacles are usually safe bets. When it comes 
to straight drama, tastes vary very considerably 
and no one can forecast just what a picture will do. 

Going farther afield to India. Burmah and Cey- 
lon, we find a divided market. First there are 
theaters catering for the whites, but these are 
very few in number and are only found in the 
big cities. One print only is required. Secondly, 
there are the native theaters, many oi them 
travelling concerns, which are more numerous. 
At the native shows the only films shown are 
serials, the more improbable the better, cheap 
melodramas with very, very far fetched stories, 
and slapstick comedies. Ordinary drama does not 
interest the natives. 

All things considered England is still the best 
bet for the American manufacturer, and the wise 
producer will concentrate on these isles, selling 
his stuff from here to the continental buyers who 
visit this country. British producers are now 
buying blindly in the novel market, and tying 
themselves up with a lot of unfilmable stuff. There- 
fore, the American producer, who is encouraging 
authors of standing to write direct for the screen, 
will have a big pull over his competitors. 

And as I have indicated above the American 
who runs an efficient exploitation and presenta- 
tion service should find no difficulty in establish- 
ing a foothold in this market. 

English Exchanges 

In London there are, according to the Kine- 
niatograph Year Book, there are 89 exchanges. 
Manchester, Leeds and Birmingham follow in im- 
portance. In Wales Cardiff is the chief distrib- 
uting point ; in Scotland, Glasgow and in Ireland 
Dublin. 

English Producers 

Ace Film Producing Co., 173, Renfield Street, 
Glasgow. 

Aerofilms, Ltd., The London Aerodrome. Hen- 
den, London, X. W. 9. 

African Film Productions, Ltd., 3. Leicester 
Street, London, W. C. 2. 

Alder, V. A., Broom Studios, Wells House, Ted- 
dington. 

Alliance Film Co., Central Buildings, West- 
minister, S. W. 1. 

Anglo-American Speciality Co., 3, Desmesne 
Street, Wallasey. 

Anglo-Swiss Trading Co., Ltd., 21, Devonshire 
Road, Hackney. E. 9. 

Artistic Films, Ltd., 93-95, Wardour Street, Lon- 
don, W 1. 

Atlantic Film Co., 12. Archer Street, London, 
W. 1. 

Barker Motion Photography. Ltd., Crafton House, 

Golden Square, London, W. 1. 
Birmingham Film Producing Co., Ltd., 88, John 

Bright Street, Birmingham. 



FILM EXPORTS 
For the 12 Months Ending June 30, 1920 



Exported to 1918 

Motion Picture Films Quantity Value 

Not exposed, lin. ft. 57,905,064 $1,385,291 

Exposed, lin. ft 84,546,576 

Exported to — 

Denmark 517,481 

France 1,943,434 

Italy 2,270,271 

Norway 3,096,203 

Spain 824,362 

United Kingdom.. 18.603,518 

Canada 15.327,863 

Newfoundland and 

Labrador 947,218 

Cuba 1,917,994 

Argentina 6,110,686 

Brazil 4,015,881 

Japan 1,928.759 

Australia 10,695,239 

Other Countries... 6,347,007 



1919 

Quantity Value 
93,131,290 $2,161,210 
5,132,448 96.933,749 5,963,888 



1920 

Quantity Value 
90,398,122 $2,204,273 
188,527,165 8,888.535 



17,650 
193,208 
61,838 
220,886 
45,555 
1,440,272 
1.142,495 

24,395 
75,102 
261,265 
209,221 
81,230 
660,304 
699,027 



3,849,014 
3,853,300 
503,375 
6,258,138 
2,203,159 
15,100,604 
11,010,343 

2,575,830 
3,778,849 
lo2,664 
5,230,382 
3,317,686 
10,407.894 
22,082,511 



259,644 
385,745 
44,300 
462,816 
115,310 
1,368,355 
824,818 

93,611 
173,486 
260,784 
263,204 
121,019 
531,415 
1.058,721 



5.816,537 
22,250,847 
677,120 
3,410,232 
6.071,560 
45,538,551 
17.952.51 1 

1,950,337 
6,761,701 
9,920,491 
8.416,158 
6,302,468 
14,238,587 
39,220,065 



233,646 
943.781 
30,273 
330.770 
242.569 
2,348,256 
1,226.514 

79,541 
248,226 
330.104 
363.544 
233.028 
653.047 
1,625,236 



241 



r 




JOSEPH HENABERV 

Director 

FAMOUS PLAYERS— LASKY COMPANY 



242 



Brillant Film Co., 12, Archer Street, London, 
W. 1. 

Bohemia Film Co., 13, Victoria Street, Blackpool. 
B. P. Films, Ltd., Crammer Court, High Street, 

Clapham, London, S. W. 4. 
British Actors' Film Co., Crafton House, Golden 

Square, London, W. 1. 
British & Colonial Kinematograph Co., Ltd., 

33-35 Endell Street, London, W. C. 2. 
British Pictures (1918), Ltd., 3, Gerrard Place, 

London, W. 1. 
Broadwest Films, Ltd., 175, Wardour Street, 

London, W. 1. 
Bullen & Broome Film Co., 43, Zig Zag Road, 

Wallasey, near Liverpool. 
Butcher's Film Service, Ltd., Camera House, Far- 

ringdon Avenue, London, E.C.4. 
Cairns Film Co., Watcombe Hall, Torquay. 
Cardeaur's, Ltd., Kinema House, Bishop Street, 

Coventry. 

Central Film Producing Co., Central Hall, Lincoln. 

Cinechrome, Ltd., 99a, Charing Cross Road, Lon- 
don W. C. 2. 

Davidson, S. B., 588, Lea Bridge Road, Leyton, 
E. 10. 

Debenham & Co., Topical House, 5, Clifford 
Street, York. 

Diamond Super Film Co., 101, Hatton Garden, 
London, E. C. 

East and West Films, Ltd., Anglo House, Litch- 
field Street, London, W. C. 2. 

Educational Films Co., Ltd., 76, Wardour Street, 
London, W. 1. 

Famous Players-Lasky British Productions, Ltd., 
166-170, Wardour Street, London, W. 1. 

Famous Pictures, Ltd., 76, Finsbury Pavement, 
E. C. 2. 

Film Co. of Ireland, 34, Dame Street, Dublin. 

Gaiety Productions, Ltd., 151-153, Wardour 
Street, London, W. 1. 

Gaumont Co., Ltd , 5-6, Sherwood Street, Lon- 
don, W. 1. 

General Film Supply, 17, Great Brunswick Street, 
Dublin. 

George Clarke Productions, Ltd., 41 Ebury 

Street, London, S. W. 1. 
Green's Film Service, 182, Trongate, Glasgow. 
Harma Photoplays, 16, Limes Road, Croydon, 

Surrey. 

Hepworth Picture Plays, Ltd., 2, Denman Street, 

London, W. 1. 
Ideal Film Renting Co., Ltd., 76-78, Wardour 

Street, London, W. 1. 
Kine Komedy Kartoons, 66, Shaftesbury Avenue, 

London, W 1. 
Life Dramas, Ltd , 21, Replingham Road, London, 

S. W. 18. 

London Film Co., Ltd., 80-82, Wardour Street, 
London, W. 1. 

Manchester Film Producing Co., 64; Victoria 
Street, Manchester. 

Martin & Kinsman, 89-91, Wardour Street, Lon- 
don, W. 1. 

Master Films, Ltd., 6-7, Piccadilly Mansions, 
Shaftesbury Avenue, London, W. 1. 

McDowell's Commercial Films, Ltd., 213, Shaftes- 
bury Avenue, London, W. C. 2. 

Midland Actors' Film Producing Co., Ltd , 75, 
Broad Street, Birmingham. 

National Films, Ltd., 2, Burgh Quay, Dublin. 

New Agency Film Co., Ltd., 115a, Ebury Street, 
London, S. M. 1. 

Pathe Freres Cinema, Ltd., 103-109 and 84, War- 
dour Street, London, W. 1. 

Pollack-Daring Films, Coventry House, 1, 
Rupert Street, London, W. 1. 

Progress Film Co., 101, Wardour Street, London, 
W. 1. 

"Q" Films, Riverside Studios, Kew, Surrey. 
Russell's Animated Pictures, 19, de Crespigny 

Park, London, S. E. 5. 
Samuelson Film Manufacturing Co., Lt., Worton 

Hall, Isleworth. 
Sheffield Photo Co., 95, Norfolk Street, Sheffield. 
Stoll Film Co., Ltd., 155-157, Oxford Street, 

London, W. 1. 
Topical Film Co., Ltd., 80-82, Wardour Street, 

London, W. 1. 
Torquay and Paigton Photoplay Productions, 

Ltd., 13, Gerrard Street, London, W. 1 



Tower Film Co., 35, Blackfriars Street, Man- 
chester. 

Union Jack Photoplays, Ltd., 10, Staple Inn, 
Holborn, London, W. C. 1. 

Vanity Films, Ltd., 12, Garrick Chambers, 
Charing Cross Road, London, W. C. 2. 

Welsh, Pearson & Co., Ltd., West End Houses, 
3-6 Rupert Street, London, W. 1. 

Windsor' Films, 22, Denman Street, London, W. 1. 

World's Best Pictures, 35-36, Piccadilly Man- 
sions, Piccadilly Circus, London, W. 1. 

British Studios 

Ace Film Producing Co., Thornliebank, Glasgow 
Aerofllms, Ltd., The London Aerodrome, Hendon, 

London, N. W. 9. 
African Films Productions, Ltd., Killarney, 

Johanunesburg, South Africa. 
Barker Motion Photography, Ltd., Ealing 

Green, London, W. 5. Phone: Ealing 211. 
B. P. Films, Ltd., Cranmer Court High Street, 

Clapham, London, W. 4. 
British Actors' Film Co., Melbourne Road, 

Bushey, Herts. 
British & Colonial Kinematograph Co., Ltd., Hoe 

Street, Walthamstow, E. 17. 
British Pictures, Ltd., Tuilerie Street, Hackney 

Road, London, E. 2. 
Broadwest Films, Ltd., Wood Street, Waltham- 
stow. 

Broadwest Films, Ltd., Portsmouth Road, Esher. 
Cairns Film Co., Watcombe Hall, Torquay. 
Central Film Producing Co., Eel Pie Island, 
Twickenham. 

Davidson, I. B., 588, Lea Bridge Road, Leyton, 
E. 10. 

Famous-Players-Lasky British Productions, Ltd., 

Poole Street, Islington. 
Famous Pictures, Ltd., Woodlands, Whetstone, 

London, N. 

Gaiety Productions, Wadden New Road, Croydon 
Gaumont Co., Lime Grove, Shepherd's Bush, 

London, W. 12. 
Geo. Clarke Productions, Ltd., 115a, Ebury Street, 

London, S. W. 1. 
Harma Co., 16, Limes Road, Croydon. 
Hepworth Picture Plays, Ltd., Hurst Grove, 

Walton-on-Thames. 
Ideal Film Co , Ltd. ; Boreham Wood, Elstree, 

Herts. 

London Film Co., St. Margaret's, Twickenham. 
Midland Actors' Film Co., 76, Broad Street, Bir- 
mingham. 

Progress Film Co., Bunkalow Town, Shoreham- 
on-Sea. 

"Q" Films Riverside Studios, Kew, Surrey. 
Reardon British Films, Ltd., Princes Studios, 

Kew Bridge, Brentford, Middlesex. 
Samuelson Film Co., Worton Hall, Isleworth, 

Middlesex. 

Stoll Film Co., Regent Studio, Park Road, 
Surbiton. 

Torquay & Paignton Photoplays, Ltd., Public Hall, 

Paignton, S. Devon. 
Welsh Pearson & Co., 41, Craven Pork, Harles- 

den, N. W. 

Windsor Films, The Hall, Bromley Road, Cat- 
ford,. S. E. 6. 

London Film Importers 

African Film Productions, Ltd., 3, Leicester 

Street, London, W. C. 2. 
Albion Cinema Supplies Co., 30, Gerrard Street, 

London, W. 1. 
Albion Films, Ltd., 19, Dunlop Street, Glasgow. 
All British Film Agency, 132, Lower Road, 

Rotherhithe, London, S. E. 16. 
Allen Theaters of Canada, 3 to 6, Rupert Street, 

London, W. 1. 
Allied Exporters, Ltd., 73 and 78, York Street, 

Westminster, London, S. W. 1. 
American Co. (London), Ltd., 89-91 Wardour 

Street, London, W 1. 
Anglo-American Speciality Co., 3, Demesne 

Street, Wallasey. 
Anglo Film Agencies, Ltd., 1, Litchfield Street, 

London, W. C. 2. 
Anglo-Swiss Trading Co., Ltd., 21, Devonshire 

Road, Hackney, E. 9. 
Anima Film Co., 8, New Compton Street, London, 

W. C. 2. 



243 



JUNE ELVIDGE 



244 



Australian Films, Ltd., I, Albermarle Street, Pic- 
cadilly, London, W, 1. 

Harnett Film Agency, 62, Frith Street, London. 
W. 1. 

Hios Films, 2, Deninan Street, London, W. 1 
Brockliss, J. F., Ltd., 167-9, Wardour Street, 

London, W. 1. 
Ghallis, 9. G., 167-9, Wardour Street, London. 

W. 1. 

Davison, T. H., 171, Wardour Street, London, 

w r. 

F^clair Societe Industrielle Cinematographique, 2t. 

Denmark St., London, W. C. 2. 
Kssanay Film Service. 4, Soho Square. London. 

W. 1. 

Excelsior M. P.. Co., 213, Shaftesburv Avenue. 
London. W. C. 2. 

F-xport Film Service, 130, Wardour Street. 
London, W. 1. 

Kxpress Film Service. Ltd., 3, Kingly Street. 
London, W. 1. 

Famous- Players Film Co, Ltd., 166-170, War- 
dour Street, London, W. 1. 

F'raser. A., 26 Charing Cross Road. London. 
W. C. 2. 

Gaumont Co., Ltd., 5-6, Sherwood Street, London. 
W. 1. 

GihI. E.. & Co., Ltd.. 153, Wardour Street. Lon- 
don, W. 1. 

Hughes and Hughes & Co., 167, Wardour Street. 
London, W. 1. 

Imperial Film Co., 167-169, Wardour Street, Lon- 
don, W. 1. 

International Film Traders, 6, Gloucester Man- 
sions, Shaftesbury Avenue, London, W C. 2. 

International Supplies Co., 13, Gerrard Street. 
London, W 1. 

Inter-Ocean Film Co., Ltd.. 164, Wardour Street, 
London, W.l. 

family, David, 161. Wardour Street. London. 
W. 1. 

E. & C. Films, Oxford House. 9-15. Oxford 
Street, London, W. 1. 

London and Counties Film Bureau, 29a, Charing 
Cross Road, London, W. C. 2. 

Martin's Cinematograph Film Go., 40, Gerrard 
Street, London, W. 1. 

M P. Sales Agency, Ltd., 1, Soho Square. Lon- 
don, W 1. 

Mundell, D., 4, West Nile Street, Glasgow. 

Nordisk Film Co., Ltd., 166-170. Wardour Street, 
London, W. 1. 

Olsen, J. & Co.. 89 91. Wardour Street, London. 
W. 1. 

Pathe Freres Cinema. Ltd., 103-109 and 84. War- 
dour Street, London. W. 1. 

Phillips Co., Lionel, 29a, Charing Cross Road, 
London, W. C. 2. 

Prieur. R, & Co., Ltd., 40. Gerrard Street. 
London, W. 1. 

Ratisboune, F"., 24, Denmark Street, London, 
W. C. 2. 

Screen Plays, Ltd.. 26, Litchfield Street, London, 
W. C. 2. 

Serra, G. 22, Denman Street, London, W.l. 
Smith, Bernard, 165, Wardour Street, London. 
W. 1. 

Smith's Film Sales Agency, 29a. Charing Cross 
Road. London, W.C. 2. 

Standard Film Agency, 165, Wardour Street, Lon- 
don, W 1. 

Swedish Biograph Co., 93-95, Wardour Street. 

London, W.l. 
Thanhouser Films, Ltd., 167-169, Wardour Street. 

London, W.l. 
Tippett (J. D.) Productions, Ltd., 37-39. Oxford 

Street, London, W.l. 
Trans-Atlantic Film Co., Ltd., Universal House. 

37-39, Oxford Street, London, W.l. 
Woest. E. C. 6, Shaftesbury Mansions. 140a. 

Shaftesbury Avenue. London, K.C.2. 

London Film Exporters 

African Film Productions, Ltd . 3, Leicester 

Street. London, W.C.2. 
Albion Cinema Supplies Co., 30 Gerrard Street. 

London, W. 1. 
Albion Films, Ltd., 79, Dunlop Street, Glasgow. 
American Co. (London), Ltd.. 89-91. Wardour 

Street, London. W. 1. 



American Film Releases, 16. Great Chapel Street, 

London, W. 1. 
Anglo-American Specialty Co., 3. Demesne Street, 

Wallasey. 

Anglo Film Agencies, Ltd., 1, Litchfield Street, 
London, W. C. 2. 

Anglo-Swiss Trading Co., Ltd., 21, Devonshire 
Road, Hackney, E.9. 

Brockliss, J. F., Ltd., 1 67-9, Wardour Street, Lon- 
don, W.l. 

Challis, A. G.. 167-9, Wardour Street, London. 
W.l. 

Cineproductions, Ltd., 26, Litchfield Street, Lon- 
don, W.C.2. 

Davison, T. H., 171, Wardour Street, London, 
W.l. 

David P. Howell Co., 29a, Charing Cross Road. 

London, W.C. 2. 
Eclair Societe Industrielle Cinematographique, 24, 

Denmark Street, London, W.C. 2. 
Essanay Film Service, Ltd., 1, Soho Sq., London. 

W.l. 

Export Film Service, 130, Wardour Street, Lon- 
don, W.l. 

Express Film and Cine Agency, 7 9, Commercial 

Buildings, Dame Street, Dublin. 
Famous Players Film Co., Ltd., 166-170, Wardour 

Street, London, W.l. 
Eraser, A., 26, Charing Cross Road, London, 

W.C.2. 

Gaumont Company, Ltd., 6. Denman Street. Lon- 
don, W.l. 

Gihl, E., & Co.. Ltd., 153, Wardour Street, Lon- 
don, W.l. 

Ideal Film Renting Co., Ltd., 76-78, Wardour 

Street, London, W.l. 
Indian & Colonial Supply Association. 85-86. Far- 

ringdon Street, London, E.C.3. 
Industrial Supply Co.. Ltd., 26, Angel Street. 

Sheffield. 

International Film Traders, 6, Gloucester Man- 
sions, Shaftesbury Avenue. London, W.C. 2. 

International Variety & Theatrical Agency, Ltd., 
3, Leicester Street, London, W.C. 2. 

Inter-Ocean Film Co., Ltd., 164, Wardour Street. 
London, W.l. 

Jamily, David, 161, Wardour Street, London, W.l. 

FRANCE 
French Customs Tariff 

The rate of duty on almost every kind of mer- 
chandise has been increased since last year, cal- 
culated by the addition of a coefficient. For films 
the coefficient is 1.6, and printed matter 2.1. Thus 
by using the printed tariff published for 1919 we 
take Par. 469 qua., kinema films, and multiply by 
1.6, which brings the present customs duty to: 
Per 100 kilogs. 
New rate of duty (220 lbs.) 

General tariff * M inimum tariff 
(multiply old tariff by 1.6) 

Printed films Frs. 264.00 Frs. 176.00 

Raw stock Frs. 480.00 Frs. 320.00 

Par. 470 — Printed matter — 
(multiply old tariff by 2.1) 

Without illustrations. Frs. 126.00 Frs. S4 ill) 

Illustrated Frs. 147.50 Frs. 105.00 

"Multiply by the coefficient of 2.1 for printed 
matter. 

Control of Films 

The censorship instituted during the war was 
removed for the press and theatrical productions, 
including songs, etc., in October, but has been re- 
tained for moving pictures in the form of a Board 
of Examiners (Commission des Examins des Films) 
hilding session in the Rue de 1'Entrepot, attached 
to the Central Customs House of Paris. This 
committee of 30 is composed of the following: 

Maurice Faure, senator (chairman) ; Charles 
Deloncle, Simpan, Leon Berard. Honnarat, dep- 
utes ; Bargas, secretary of Syndicate of Kinema 
Workers: B. Levy, exhibitor; L. Brezillon. chair- 
man of Exhibitors' Syndicate ; Delcourron, of 
Court of Appeal ; Damaria, chairman of Kinema 
Manufacturers' Syndicate; Deville, municipal coun- 
cillor; Fremont, L. Gaumont, F. Gemier, director 
of Theatre Kinema Workers; B. Levy, exhibitor; 
L. Brezillon, chairman of Societe des Gens de 
Lettres; Lebussiere. Lemarquant, of Ministry of 
Interior. 1'aul Leon, director of Beaux Arts; 



24$ 



REX INGRAM 

DIRECTOR 
'The FOUR HORSEMEN of the APOCALYPSE" 

Recent Releases 

"SHORE ACRES" "UNDER CRIMSON SKIES" 

"HEARTS ARE TRUMPS'' 



246 



Jlme. Auger, secretary of Federation of School 
Teachers ; Migette. of Prefecture of Police; M. 
Lhauser. police inspector; C. Pathe, Robelin, sec- 
retary of League of Teachers ; Reynouard. coun- 
cillor of state; Rollet. magistrate; Roussell, mu 
nicipal councillor; Yendrin. councillor of Depart- 
ment of Seine. Secretary of Board of Exam- 
iners, M. Seguin, of the theatre office at Ministry 
of Fine Arts. 

There are at present only 1,560 kinema halls in 
France, with a population of 39.600.000. The 
population of Paris, according to the last census 
of March 5, 1911, was 2,888,110, and is now offi- 
cially estimated at 2.800.000, with only 230 kin- 
ema establishments. Prices of admission have 
been increased and now range, for the cheapest 
seats, from fr. 1.50 in the working quarters, to 
frs. 2.50 for the continual shows on the Boule- 
vards. For the average month of September. 1919, 
the takings at some of the principal palaces were: 
Marivaux, frs. 103.000; Aubert's Neauveaute, frs. 
109,000 (frs. 150.000 in October); Lutetia, frs. 
101.000; Pathe Palace, frs. 70,000; Omnia, frs. 
73,000; Tivoli, frs. 95.000 (frs. 140,000 in Octo- 
ber) ; St. Paul, frs. 65,000 (frs. 90.000 in Octo- 
ber). 

Film Renters and General Dealers in 
Supplies 

Adam, 11, Rue Beaudin. 

Agence General Cinematographique, 16, Rue 

Grange Bateliere. 
Agence Moderne Cinema, 105, Rue St. Lazare. 
Aubert, L., 124, Avenue de la Republique. 
Bleriot, H., 187, Rue du Temple. 
Bowles, Geo. (Guy, Croswell, Smith. Ltd.), 23, 

Rue de la Michodiere. 
Bonnet, 4, Rue de la Bastille. 
Bowles, Geo., 23, Rue de la Michodiere. 
Clement, E. G., 18, Rue Albouy. 
Continsouza, 9, Rue des Envierges. 
Debrie, 111, Rue St. Maur. 
Decaix, 25. Rue de la Folie Mericourt. 
Delaunay, 109, Cours de Vincennes. 
Demaria, J., 35, Rue de Clichy. 
Delac and Vandal. 16, Rue Grange Bateliere. 
Demaria-Lapiere, 169, Quai de Valmy. 
Eclair, Sor-iete, 12, Rue Gaillon. 
Faliez, Auffreville, Mantes. 
Franck and Cie., 8, Rue Brunei. 
Foucher, 31, Boulevard Bonne, Nouvelle. 
Fox, Wm„ 24, Boulevard des Italiens. 
Gaumont, L., 57, Rue St. Roch. 
Galiment, 24, Rue de Trevise. 

Gentihomme, H., 86, Rue de la Garenne. Cour- 

bevoie, Seine. 
Gilbert, G., 5". Boulevard, Richard le Noir. 
Glucksmann, Max, 80, Avenue. Gambetta. 
Harry, 158 ter. Rue du Temple. 
Howell, B., 6, Rue de la Paix. 
Hermagis, 29, Rue du Louvre. 
Korsten, L.. 8, Rue Le Itrun. 
Kodak, Eastman Co., 39, Avenue, Montaigne. 
Location Nationale, 10, Rue Berenger, Berenger. 
Lordier, G., 28, Boulevard, Bonne, Nouvelle. 
Lumiere Freres, Lyons, France. 
Mazo, 33, Boulevard, St. Martin. 
Meric, 17, Rue Hleue. 
Mollier, E., 20, Rue Felicien, David. 
Mundus Films, 12, Rue Chaussee d'Antin. 
Monat Film (import of films), 42, Rue le Peletier. 
Osso, A., 416, Rue Saint Honore. 
Pathe Freres, 30, Boulevard des Italiens. 
I'etit, G.. 37, Rue de Trevise. 
I'hocea Location. 8, Rue dc la Michodiere. 
Kaoult Films, 21, Rue Hergere. 
Rapid Film, (>, Rue Ordener. 
Soleil. 14. Rue Therese. 
Sutto, 325, Rue St. Martin. 

Societe de Cine Multiphone, 67, Rue de Richelieu. 
Societe Tirage, I.. Maurice, 83. Rue Taitbout. 
Societe Carbtirox. 77. Avenue de Clichy. 
Societe E r lipse, 94. Rue Saint Lazare. 
Tippett, John 1). Productions, Ltd., 83, bis Rue 
Lafayette. 

Union Delta, 34, Rue Charles Baudelaire. 
I'nivers Cinema Location, 6, Rue de l'Entrepot. 
Yitagraph Co.. 15. Rue Ste. Cecile. 
Van Gottsenhoveti. 10, Rue de Ghateaudun. 



Film Producers in France 

Dulac and Herlanger, 188, Boulevard Haussmann 
Paris. 

Gaumont, 28, Rue des Alouttes, Paris. 

Eclair, 12, Rue Gaillon, Paris. 

Eclipse, 94, Rue St. Lazare, Paris. 

Pathe Freres, 67, Faubourg St. Martin, Paris. 

Mercanton Film, 53, Rue de la Michodiere. 

Royal Film, 23, Rue de la Michodiere. 

S. C. A. G. L., 30, Rue Louis le Grand, Paris. 

L. Aubert, 7, Rue des Reservoirs, Joinville le 

Pont, Seine. 
Jules Verne Film. 37, Rue St. Lazare. 
Louis Nalpas, Cimiez, Nice. 

Pierrot Film, 42, Avenue de Neuilly, Neuillysur- 
Seine. 

Diamant, 18, Faubourg de Temple, Paris. 

Film d'Art, 14, Rue Chauveau. Xeuilly-sur-Seine. 

Hurdigala Films, 237, Rue Xayrac, Bordeaux. 

Phocea Film, 3, Rue des Recollettes, Marseilles. 

Plaissetty, 10 bis Rue Chateaudun. 

Parisienne Film, 21, Rue Saulnier. 

Monte Carlo Film, 18, Cite Trevise. 

Kinema Syndicates 

Syndicat Francais des Directeurs de Cinemato- 

graphes. 199, Rue St. Martin, Paris (Leon Bre- 

zillon, president). 
Syndicat des Directeurs de Cinematograph du Cen 

tre, 6, Quai d'Orleans, Tours. 
Syndicat sur la Cote d'Azur (M. Clidat, se<-re 

tary), Tivoli Cinema, Pont Yieux, Nice. 
Syndicat de la Presse Cinematographiques, 28, 

Boulevard St. Denis, Paris. 
Association Professionelle de la Presse Cinema. 

30, Rue Bergere, Paris. 
Chambre Syndicate Francais de la Cinematographe 

et des industries qui s'y attachment (M. Kahn. 

secretary), 54, Rue Etienne Marcel, Paris. 
Federation Francaise de la Cinematographe, 199, 

Rue St. Martin, Paris. 
Societe Amicale "Le Projection," 199, Rue St. 

Martin, Paris. 
Federation de la Cinematograph du Midi de France 

1 bis. Rue Cannebiere, Marseilles. 
Co-operative des Auteurs Dramatiques, 2, Rue des 

Italiens, Paris. 

French Kinema Journals 

Cine Journal, 30, Rue Bergere. Paris. 

Cine Pour Tous, 26 bis. Rue Traversiere, Paris. 

L'Ecran, 199, Rue St. Martin. 

Le Courrier Cinematographique, 28, Boulevard St. 

Denis, Paris. 
Scenario, 9, Rue de Clichy, Paris. 
Le Film, 144, Rue Montmartre, Paris. 
Hebdo Film, 23, Boulevard Bonne Nouvelle, Paris. 
Cineopse, 59, Boulevard, Richard Lenoir, Paris. 
Le Cinema, 28, Boulevard Bonne Nouvelle, Paris. 
Cinematograph Francaise, 48, Rue de Bonds, 

Paris. 

Avenir F^orain, 3, Boulevard St. Martin, Paris. 

SPAIN 
Spanish Product 

Spanish production has made great strides dur- 
ing the last twelve months. A lot of the smaller 
firms have simply disappeared, but the larger firms 
have gone ahead. Studio Films alone during the 
last twelve month has produced some eight serials, 
"Las Joyas de la Condesa" (The Countess' Jew- 
els), "El Mefisto" (Mephistofeles), "Codicia" (Av- 
arice), "El Protejide de Satan" (The Devil's Fa 
vorite), "La Dama Duende" (The Woman of 
Mystery), &c, in addition to Zamacois' "Elotre." 
It is the most important producing firm in Spain 
at the present moment, working all the year 
round, and having its own stock company, which 
includes some of the best film actors and actresses 
in Spain. Royal Films has produced during the 
last twelve months "Fuerza y Nobleza" (Noblesse 
Oblige), "La Cortina Verde" (The Green Cur- 
tain). "Juan Jose" (a film adaptation of Dicenta's 
famous novel), and "Harlequines de Seda y Oro" 
( Puppets of Tinsel and Gold), which is without 
exception one of the finest films ever produced in 
Spain, both as regards photography and acting. 
Patria Films, of Madrid, has also produced the 
following: "La Dicha Ajena" (My Neighbor's 
Happiness), "La Perla de la Tribu" (The Pearl 
of tlie Tribe), "El Fantismo del Castille" (The 



247 




248 



Ghost of the Castle), &c. ; while Madrid Films 
recently produced "La Madonna de las Rosas" 
(The Madonna of the Roses). Lotos Films, of 
Barcelona, also produced during the year "Suene 
o' Realidad" (Dreams or Reality). 

Spanish Producers 

Barcelona. 

A. Cabot Puig, Aragon 249. 

Argos Films (Jose Carreras), Paseo de las 

Camelias 39. 
Basso (Federico). Ramlila Estudios 8. 
Basch, Jose Maria, Plaza Buensuceso 3. 
Castello (Salvador), Falco Film, lndustria 202. 
Cabot Puig, Horta. 
Dessy Film, Aragon 249. 
Estrella Film, Universidad 98. 
Hispano Films, Craywinkel 20. 
Iris Film, Diputacion 280. 
Lotos Films, Ranibla Cataluna 40. 
Oimpia Films, Ranibla del Cen ro 7. 
Royal Films, Asturias 7. 
Sociedad Anon Sanz, Paseo de Gracia 105. 
Studio Film, Carretera de Sans 106. 

Madrid. 

Patria Films, Conde de Aranda 6. 
Hispano Actualidad Films, Fuencarral 138. 
Rafael Salvador Films, Salvador 3. 

Portugal. 
Invicta Films Ltd., Porto. 
Lusitania Films, Rua de S. Berto Lisbon. 
Portugalia Films, Lisbon. 

THE YEAR IN ITALY 

The Italian Kinema Union has formed a trust 
with a capital of 30,000,000 francs by the union 
of many firms — viz., Albertinis Films, Cines Films, 
Bertini Films, Caesar Films, Celio Films, D' 
Ambra Films, Films d'Arte Italiana, Gloria Films, 
Itala Films, Palatini Films, Pasquale Films, Photo 
Drama Producing Films, Tiber Films. 

Imports 

The importation of films has been very con- 
siderable, especially for American films, the best 
of them being "The Mask with the White Teeth," 
"The Red Brand," "The Diamond of Death," 
"The Mystery of New York," "The House of 
the Implacable Hatred" (with Pearl White), "The 
Vampires," "The Desert Isle," "In the Country 
of Dollars" (with Mrs. Vernon Castle, "The 
Dancers of Millions" (with Douglas Fairbanks, 
the favourite American actor here). French 
films have also obtained great success, the fol- 
lowing especially being highly appreciated : "The 
Count of Monte Cristo," "Ravengar" (featured 
by the great French actor Matot), "Twenty 
Thousand Leagues Under the Sea." 

Total of Imported Films 

Triangle 35 films. Metro 10. Fox 15, of several 
American firms 10, Pathe 100, Gaumont 10, 
Eclipse 8, Eclair 8, several French firms 15, 
English films 12, Spanish 3. Total: Films 226 
(metres 151,200). 

Italian Films 

The Italian films of greatest interest, sold all 
the world over, have been : "Mascagni's 'Satanic 
Rhapsody' " (Cines), "Noblesse Oblige" (Am- 
brose Films), seven films with Francesca Bertini. 
"The Seven Mortal Sins" (Caesar Films), "The 
Wife of Claude," with Pina Menichelli (Itala 
Films), "Adieu. My Youth! " with Maria Jaco- 
bini, "The Wives and the Oranges," "The 
Dancers," "All the World's a Stage," with Mary 
Corwin (Do- Re-Mi Films), "Maciste Athlete." 
"Maciste Medium," "Maciste In Love" ( I tali 
Films), "Leda Without the Swan," by Gabriele 
D'Aimunrico (Lombardo Film), "The Prince of 
the Impossible," with our great actor, Ruggero 
Kiuggeri, "Bernstein's "Israel," with Vittorina 
Lepanto, "His Majesty Money," by Montepin, 
"The Power of Conscience," featured by Ermite 
Lacconi, "The Chaste Sinner," "The Pretty Lady 
of Porcelain," with Diana Rareunc, "The Mar- 
riage of Olympia," "Femmina," with Italia Al- 
niirante_ Mauri and Cassini. 

Italian Film Producers 

ROME. 

Appia Film, 24, Via Appia Nuova. 
Arcana Film, 3. Via Delle Carrozze. 



Bernini Film, 6, Via Xazionale. 

Laesar Film, 51, \ la Carlo tea. 

I apitohum Film, 188, Via Nazionale. 

I. astelli lestro Film, 48, Via Appia -Nuova. 

L elio Film, Gardmo Zoologioo. 

I himera Film, Via Alibeert N. 1. 

Cincgrafico Film, 42. Via della Madolalena. 

Lines Film, 51, Via Macerata. 

Colosseum Film, 12, Via Grigoriana. 

U' Ambra Film, 8, Via SS. Giovannie Paolo. 

Uo-Re-iVii Film, 9, Via lorino. 

t-ha rilm, 29, Via dei Lucchesi. 

F-tiusca Film, 36, Via Palermo. 

Fert Film, 8, \ la Piave. 

film D'Arte, 10, Via Allessandro Torloiua. 

nlmgai, 18/, Via F'laminia. 

Mim.ssmia, 54, Via Leccosa. 

Morensia Film, 92, Corso Umberto 1. 

rlegrea Fi.m, 18. Via Chieti. 

tlora fci'lm, 25, Via Otranto. 

Floreal Film, 104, Via Agostino De-Iretis. 

Fontana Fugenio Film, 123, Corso Umberto 1. 

Gemima Bellincioni Film, 19, Corso d'ltaha. 

Gladiator Film, 48, Via Appia Xuova. 

Guzzoni Film, 7, Viale delle Provincie. 

Industrial Film, 47 Via Firenze. 

Libertas Film, 38, Via Izonzto. 

Medusa Film, 2, Piazzo Adriauo. 

Mendional Film, 12, Via de S. Vincenzio 

Anastasio. 
Minerva Him. 400, Corso Umberto 1. 
toyriam Finn, 183, Via del Tritone. 
.sova Film, 11, Via Antonio Scialoja. 
Novissima Film, Stabihmento Via Altreolo 

iiaccarini. 

Ohmpus Mini, 333, Corso Lmberto 1. 

I'aiatino Film, 8, SS. \ lovannie Paolo. 

rerseo F ilm, 59, V la Flammia. 

I'lioeous Film, 210, Via del Tritone. 

i-olistor Film, 39, Via di Ripettor. 

Uuinnius Film, Via Pnvata di Via Nomentana 

iunascimento Film, V icolo Parioli, V lllino 

r lanchetti. 
Romanm Film, 51, Via Milazzio. 
bantoni Dante e Co. Film, 4, Via Niccolo Porpora. 
i^ette colli Film, 285, Corso Umberto 285. 
lespi Film, Villa F'lora Via Forh. 
1 iber F ilm, V lccolo 3 Madoune Villa Sacchetti. 
V eha Film, Vicolo dello Scorpione Porta S. 

Uiovanni. 
Victoria film, 11, Corso d'Htaha. 
£enit Mini, 14, Via delle Finalize. 

Florence. 

Montalbano Film, 6, Via Vecchietti. 

Milan. 

Leoni Film, Corso Venezia, 11. 

tspedia Fnm, 32, Via Torino. 

lVlila'nb Film, Stabihmento Milano Bovisa. 

Armenia Fum, 43, Via Boccaccio. 

Cina Drama, 5, Via di S. Dalmazio. 

Fortuna Film, 14, Via S. Paolo. 

Lydiaune Film, 19, Via Leopardi. 

Gomoaraa Film, 18, Piazzale Magenta. 

Kagg.o Film, 1, Via Soltermo. 

Kosa film, 28, Via Monte Napoleone. 

S. i. A. — Societa Italiana per Produzioni Cine- 

matographe, 19, Via Leopardi. 
Siienm.ni Film, 8, Via Silvio Pelhco. 
Leonardo da V inci Film, 19, Via Spadori. 
zvanotta Fum, 22, Piazza Duomo. 

Turin. 

De Giglio Film, 4, Via Principe Tommaso. 

Aibertmi Film, 18, Piazzo Castello. 

corona Film, 14, Corso Vercelh. 

Edison Film, 2, Galleria Natta. 

intone Fi.m, 19, Via Salazzo. 

Gladiator Film, 8,Vai S. Auselmo. 

Gloria Film, 39, Via Quittengo. 

Itala Film, Ponte Trombetta. 

Italo. FIgiziana Film 52, Via Vanova. 

Italics film, 43. Via Nizza. 

lupiter Film, 3, Via Belriore. 

Latina Ars, 29, Via Roma. 

Pasquali Film. 75, Corso Stupinigi. 

Photo Drama Producing Co., Grughasco Torino. 

Kodolrt Film, 14, Corso Yercelli 

Ambrosio Film, 152, Via Rasella. 

Sinclair Film, Torino. 

Savoja Film, 20, Via Asti. 



249 



Naples. 

Lombardo Film, Via Cimarosa Vomero. 
Del Torre Film, 14, Via Partinope. 
Alba Film, 38, Via S. Felice at Vomero. 
Dora Film, 16, Via di Capua. 
Gorenni Film, 95, Riviera da Chiaga. 
Molinari Film, 4, Via G. Vacca. 
Polifilm, Via Cimarosa al Vomero. 
Paris Film, Via L. Giordano al Vomero. 
Lucarelli Film, Via M. Stabile Palermo. 

Some Italian Stars 

Rareune Diana, first actress of the Vespi Film. 
Menichelli Pina, first actress of the Rinaximento 
Film. 

Bertini Francesca, first actress of the Caesar Film 
Soava Gailone, first actress of the Palatino Film. 
Hesperia, first actress of the Tiber Film. 
Maria Jacobini. first actress of the Fert Film. 
Helene Makouska, first actress of the Gladiator 
Film. 

Dolly Morgan, first actress of the Etrusca Film 
Mary Bayma Riva, first actress of the Florcal 
Film. 

India 

The five or six part film appears to appeal most 
generally, while drama has a greater drawing pow- 
er than comedy. 

India Films, Ltd., has a branch in Calcutta, 
Pathe has a branch in Bombay, Universal has an 
r.^ent there, and in addition there are small groups 
of film and projector agents in Bombay and Cal- 
cutta. There is a big future in India. Many 
fa : rly large towns are as yet without any source 
of amusement, and in no town has the supply 
outgrown the needs of the inhabitants. 

Film Buyers in India 

E. H. Du Casse, Picture House, 19 Chowringhee. 
Calcutta. 

Bijou Grand Opera House, Lindsay St., Calcutta. 
J. F. Maddan, Elphinstone Bioscope, Calcutta. 
K. D. & Bros.. Hornby Road, Bombay. 
African Films, Ltd., Lyons Range. Calcutta. 

Holland 

Dutch Producers 
Adam Film Co., Filmfabrick. Hollandia. 
B. Mullens, Filmfabriek. Hague. 
World's International Film Office, F. A. N'ogge- 
rath. 

Belgium 

Film Renters 
Elite Films. 85, Rue de Brabant. Bruxelles. 
Cine Location "Eclipse," 44, Rue des Plantes. 
J. Bodart and Co., 95, Rue des Plantes, Brux- 
elles. 

Victor Evrard, 86. Rue des Plantes. Bruxelles. 
Cinematographic Harry, 97, Rue des Plantes, 
Bruxelles. 

"Universal Film." 40, Rue des Plantes, Bruxelles. 
Entrepot General du Cinema, 18, Rue des Plantes. 
Bruxelles. 

Maison Charles Hendrick, 67, Rue des Plantes. 
Bruxelles. 

Exclusif Film Co., 61, Rue des Plantes. Bruxelles. 
Pathe Freres, 146. Boulevard Adolphe Max, Brux 
elles. 

De Lange, 69, Rue Verte. Bruxelles. 
A. B. and C. Company, 157, Rue Verte, Brux- 
elles. 

G. Gilbert Sallenave, 28, Rue de la Blanchisseries. 
Bruxelles. 

F. Paulsen and Co., 6. Rue des Roses, Bruxelles. 
Oscar Limpens. 84, Rue Verte, Bruxelles. 

F. Bomhals and Co.. 22. Rue du Pont-Neuf. 
Bruxelles. 

L. Aubert, 40, Place de Bronckere. Bruxelles. 

Agence Generale Cinematographique, 30, Boule- 
vard Bandouin, Bruxelles. 

Hackin, 9a, Rue des Chartreux, Bruxelles. 

Dardenne and Co., 6. Rue Dupont, Bruxelles. 

The General Cine Film, 8. Rue des Herondelles, 
Bruxelles. 

Leon Gaumont, 11, Quai au Bois Construction. 
Bruxelles. 

L. Van Goitsenhoven, 10. Rue de Chateaudcn. 
Bruxelles. 

Charles Belot, 26. Rue du Paineau, Bruxelles. 
Optima Films, 3, Rue du Grand Hospice, Brux- 
elles. 



Oncle Sam Film, 1, Rue St. Christophe, Brux 
elles. 

Film Manufacturers. 

F. Paulsen and Co., Bruxelles-Films, 6. Rue des 
Plantes, Bruxelles. 

Scaldis Film, 94, Rue de la Province, Antwerp. 

Film Importers. 
Exclusif Film Company, 61, Rue des Plantes, 
Bruxelles. 

G. Gilbert Sallenave, 28, Rue de la Blanchisseries, 
Bruxelles. 

The General Cine Film, 8. Rue des Herondelles, 
Bruxelles. 

A. B. and C. Company. 157. Rue Verte, Brux- 
elles. (Branch: Rutland Studios, 65, High 
Road, Willesden Green, London.) 

Australia 

Control of the film market in Australia is. for 
all practical purposes, vested in the Australasian 
Films, Ltd., and Feature Films, Ltd. 

The Australasian Films. Ltd., is an amalgama- 
tion of four companies — Wests, Ltd. (founded by 
T. J. West, who recently died in London), Spen- 
cer's Pictures (originally owned by Cozens Spen- 
cer), Amalgamated Pictures, Ltd. (a combination 
of Tait's Pictures and Tohnston and Gibson), and 
the Greater J. D. Williams, Ltd. (established by 
J. D. Williams, the present general manager of 
First National Exhibitors' Circuit of U. S. A.). 
Australian Films, Ltd. (with which is allied Union 
Theaters. Ltd.), under the general direction of 
Harry Musgrove, has long dominated the film 
rental field in Australia, and it has remained for 
Alec Lorimore, directing Feature Films, Ltd . 
?nd distributing Paramount-Artcraft and World 
Features, to offer the first serious challenge to its 
sunremacv. 

In addition to the two concerns mentioned. Fox 
is onerating his own exchanges, as is Selznick, 
and Goldwyn Productions are distributed bv J. C. 
Williamson Films, Ltd. Control of the Co-oper- 
ative concern, until lately an independent com- 
pany, distributing Metro pictures, has been ac- 
quired by Australasian Films, Ltd. Other con- 
cerns also distributing in Australia include Mason 
Super Pictures, Progressive Films, and Fraser 
Films. 

In New Zealand, the New Zealand Pictures 
Supplies, Ltd. (this being a combination of Hay- 
wood's and Fuller's pictures), has the major share 
of the renting business with Lorimore and his 
Paramount-Artcraft supply bidding strongly in 
competition. 

There are around 800 picture houses of all 
classes in Australasia, many of which are — more 
particularly in the cities — entitled to rank as com- 
forta'''e. up-to-date theaters. There has been no 
attempt to introduce into Australia the advanced 
form of combined entertainment such as is com 
mon in the United States today. 

The principal theaters in Sydney are the Ly- 
ceum. Crystal Palace. Empress. Lyric, Majestic, 
Kind's Cross, Strand and Olymnia (all controlled 
by U'v'on Theaters, Ltd.), the Havmarket, Hoyts. 
and Piccadilly. In Melbourne — The Maiestic. the 
Melba, Britannia, Auditorium. Hoyts and Para- 
mount. In Brisbane — Maiestic. Strand. Olvmnia, 
Tivoli and Pavilion. In Adelaide — West's Olym- 
nia, the Wondercraph and Pavilion. In Perth — 
Theatre Royal, Pavilion, Majestic, Palladium and 
Grand. 

Large Circuits in Great Britain 

Weymouth — Albany Ward Circuit. Head Office : 
Guildhall Chambers. Telegrams, Variety. Wev- 
mouth. London Office, 19 Garrick St.. W.C 2 
Royal Jubilee Hall, Arcadia, Palladium. Belle 
Vue Cinema, Weymouth; Opera House. Alham 
bra. Jersey; St. Julian's Theatre, Guernsey; Pal- 
ladium. Exeter; Palace Theatre, Central Cin- 
ema, Yeovil: Palace. New Theatre. Picture 
House. Salisbury ; Palace. Pantanas Hall. Tre- 
harris : Theatre Royal. Picture House. Barnsta- 
ple; Palace, Frome : Palace. Trowbridge: Pal- 
ace, Chippenham; Palace. Warminster: Palace. 
Chepstow; Palace Theatre, Bijou Theatre, 
Bridgwater; Palace. Eiaston, Palace, Victoria 
Square, Portland. The following are also book- 
ed in conjunction: Palace, Wells; Palace, 



251 




ALBERT PARKER, Director 

Adapted and Directed "EYES OF YOUTH" 

Now under contract with Joseph Schenck to direct 
Norma Talmadge and make special productions. 



252 



Blandford ; Palace, Radstock ; Empre, Pease- 
<lown ; Palidium, Midsomer Norton; Palace 
Theatre, Weston-super Mare. (With the excep- 
tion of the three halls in Jersey and Guernsey, 
the Albany Ward Circuit has been acquired by 
Provincial Cinematograph Theatres, Ltd.) 

London — Asso. Provincial Picture Houses, Ltd. 
Head Office : 199, Piccadilly, W.l. Managing 
Director, F. E. Adams. Telegraphic address, 
Procinthe, Piccy, London. Picture House. Ab- 
erdeen; Picture House, Halifax; Picture House, 
Wednesbury ; Picture House. Willenhall; 
Queen's Picture House and Agricultural Hall 
Cinema. Wolverhampton. 

Bacon's (Sidney) Pictures. Ltd. Registered Of- 
fice, 14.1 Charing Cross Road, W.C. Govern- 
ing Director, Sidney Bacon. Telegrams, Nocab- 
dis, Ox, London. City Picture House, Carlisle: 
Electric Palace, Highgate; Highgate Empire; 
Olympia, Newcastle-on-Tyne : Public Hall, Car- 
lisle; Public Hall, Erith ; Victoria Hall, York. 

Biocolor Picture Theatres, Ltd. Reynolds House. 
5 Great Newport St., W.C. 2. Joint Managing 
Directors, E. E. Lyons and H. T. Underwood. 
Telegrams, Biomacolor, Westrand. London. 
Academy Picture House, Brighton; New Savoy 
Theatre, Glasgow ; Grand Theatre. Glasgow ; 
Pavilion Theatre and Hippodrome. Cardiff ; Col- 
iseum, Newport, Mon. ; Empire, Hollowax. Rd., 
London; Peckham Hippodrome. Peckham ; The- 
atre Royal, Swansea; Britannia Theatre, Hox- 
ton. 

Blue Halls, Ltd. 207 King St., Hammersmith, W. 
Telegrams, Kancywork, London. Blue Hall No. 
1. Blue Hall No. 2, both at 207 King St., 
Hammersmith; Blue Hall23, High Street. Put- 
ney; Blue Hall 194. Edgware Road; The Pal- 
ladium, King's Road. Brighton ; Blue Hall. Up- 
per Street, Islington, next door to the Agricul- 
tural Hall. 

Collins-Thompson Circuit. Telegrams, Cinema. 
Borough Theatre. North Shields ; Borough The- 
atre, Wallsend; Grand, Byker; Globe Theatre, 
Gosforth ; Grainger Picture Theatre. Newcastle ; 
King's Theatre, Sunderland: Howard Hall, 



North Shields; King George Hall, Cramlington ; 
Shipcote Hall, Gateshead; Miners' Theatre, Ac- 
crington; Palace, Gateshead; Picture House, 
ami Pavilion, Whitley Bay ; Scala, Gateshead. 
These theatres have since been acquired by Sol. 
Levy, of Birmingham, on behalf of the compa- 
nies in which he is interested. 
London and Midland Circuit Ltd., Reynold* 
House, 5 Great Newport St., London. Joint 
Managing Directors, E. E. Lyons and H. T. 
Underwood. Telegrams, Biomacolor, Westrad, 
London. Empire, Bradford; Coliseum. Burs- 
lem ; Victoria Theatre, Manchester; Savoy, 
Grimsby; Academy, Hammersmith; Academy, 
Nottingham; Hippodrome, Stoke; Savoy, Ply- 
mouth. 

Provincial Cinematograph Theatres, Ltd., 199 Pic- 
cadilly, London, W.l. Managing Director, E. 
E. Adams. Picture House, Belfast ; Picture 
House, Birmingham; Picture House, Bristol, 
Grafton Picture House, Dublin; New Picture 
House and Picture House, Edinburgh; Picture 
House. Glasgow; Central Picture House, Hull; 
Picture House, Leeds; Picture House, Leices- 
ter; Prince of Wales Picture House, Liverpool; 
Oxford Picture House and Market Street Pic- 
ture House, Manchester; Newcastle Picture 
House, Newcastle-on-Tyne; Picture House. Not- 
tingham ; Andrews Picture House. Plymouth ; 
Picture House. Portsmouth; Havelock Picture 
House. Sunderland; Arcade Cinema and Court 
Cinema. Darlington ; Broadway Kniema. Peter- 
borough : Arcade Cinema, Worcester. 

Manchester — Broadhcad's Theatres. Hinpodrome. 
Hulme. Proprietors. William Henry Broadhead 
and Son. Hippodrome. Hulme, Royal Osborne. 
King's. Longsight, Metropole, Openshaw, 
Queen's Park Hippodrome. Junction. Empress 
Electric, Manchester ; Royal Hippodrome, Sal- 
ford ; Pavilion, Liverpool; Empire Hippodrome 
and Pavilion, Ashton-under-Lyne ; Crown Thea- 
tre, Eccles, Manchester; Hippodrome, Bury: 
Palace and Royal Hippodrome, Preston: Win- 
ter Gardens, Morecambe. 



IMPORT AND EXPORT FIGURES 
IMPORTS 
Sensitized Negatives 

Feet Value Feet Value 

July 308,806 $5,378 84,929 $18,102 

August 16,380 510 55,180 41,260 

September 2,734,415 87,463 137,844 27,679 

October 653,413 13,148 92,504 14.156 

November 699,669 13,872 47,343 40,545 

December 1,863.189 28,402 78,090 16,543 

January 2,780,339 38,405 84,409 15,159 

February 2,227,223 31,175 85,370 23,256 

March 6.894,550 95,781 208,511 35,764 

April 11,726,098 176,286 197,068 88,816 

May 8.281,989 138,921 101,351 20,283 

June 8,299,363 161,876 245,175 158,128 



Positives 



Feet 
108,580 
161,795 
226,886 
127.685 
251,269 
310.833 
206,386 
255,651 
262,328 
237,989 
501,800 
676,364 



Value 
$7,625 

8,007 
11,839 

6,326 
12,493 
14.507 
11.819 

9,706 

9.945 
11.962 
20.828 
32.135 



EXPORTS 
Unexposed 

Feet Value 

July 7,463,038 $218,300 

August 1.215,603 59,441 

September 590,642 81,128 

October 25.234,917 526,585 

November 11.867,957 249,577 

December 3,853,050 109,704 

January 14,734,046 341,647 

February 1,172,294 46,869 

March 2,108,688 65,783 

April 1,788,701 66,341 

May 6,925,600 230,357 

June 3,696,547 117,819 



Feet 
8,246,501 
11.889,626 
20,564,031 
15,257.487 
22,096.208 
20,727,450 
12,015,051 
11,541.973 
23,793,100 
18.303.882 
20,225,824 
13,613.071 



Exposed 

Value 
$502,910 
610766 



845,617 
783.218 
824,478 
865,919 
633,359 
589,248 
1.144,203 
678,4'L' 
793.944 
707.103 



253 



JUST FINISHED 



"THE HOPE DIAMOND MYSTERY" 

Featuring Grace Darmond 
and 

"KATE PLUS 10" 

Featuring Eva Novak 



'A 



STUART PATON, Director 

HARRY S. Webb, Assistant Director 



American and Foreign Distribution Percentage Tables 



First National Exhib. Circuit 

Territory Percentage 

Sou.. Cal. & Ariz 2 27/56 

Nevada, Hawaii & Nor. Cal 3 2/14 

Alaska, Wash., Ore., Mon., Nor. and 

Ida 3 5/8 

Col. New Mexico, Utah, Wyo., So. and 

Idaho 1 3/4 

Western Canada 2 

Illinois 8 1/4 

Indiana 3 1/8 

Kan., Iowa — Neb 4 3/4 

Michigan 4 1/4 

Minn., Wis., N. & S. Dak 5 

Missouri 3 1/4 

Ohio 7 

New England 8 

Md., Dist. of Col. & Del 2 1/4 

New Jersey 3 5/8 

New York 14 1/2 

West. Va. & Western Penna 4 1/8 

Eastern Penna 4 3/4 

Eastern Canada 3 1/8 

Ga., Fla., Ala.. Va., N. & S. Car 3 1/8 

Louisiana & Mississippi 1 3/8 

Texas, Okl. & Mississippi 4 1/2 

Kentucky & Tenn 1 7/8 

Equity Pictures Corp. 

Percentage 

New England States 8 

Wash.. Ore., Mon. & Ida 4 

New York State & Nor. N. J 18 

Michigan 4 

Del., Va. and D. of C 354 

Col, Utah, New Mex. & Wy 254 

No. Car., So. Car., Ga. Fla. & Ala 354 

Ken. & Tenn 2 

East. Penn. & Sou. Jersey 454 

Cal., Ari. & Nev 5J4 

Penn. & West. 4 

Louisiana & Miss 2 

Texas, Okla. & Ark 4J4 

Iowa, Kansas & Neb 5 

Missouri 3 

Illinois 8 

Indiana 354 

Ohio 7 

Wis. No. & So. Dakota 5 

Canada 5j4 

Arrow Film Corp. 

Per cent 

1 New York State 14 

2 No. N. Jersey 3 

3 New England 8 

4 E. Penn and So. N. J 4.5 

5 W. Penn and W. Va 4 

6 Del., Md., D. C. and Va 3.5 

7 Ohio 6.S 

8 Michigan 4 

9 Illinois and Ind 11.5 

10 Minn., Wise, No. & C. Dak 5 

11 Iowa and Nebraska 4 

12 Mo. and Kans 5 

13 Col., Utah, Wyo. and N. Mex 1.5 

14 Wash., Oregon, Ida, and Mont 4 

15 Calif., Ariz, and Nev 5.5 

16 Tex., Okla. and Ark 5 

17 La. and Miss 1.5 

18 Kentucky and Tenn 2 

19 No. and So. Car., Ga., Ala. and Fla. 3.5 

20 Canada 4 

Federated Exchanges Percentages 

New York and No. N. J 17 

New England 8 

E. Penn. and So. New Jersey 4J4 

W. Penn and W. Va 4 

Del., Md., Dist. of Co. and Va 3'A 

Ohio and Kentucky 7 

Michigan (Without Northern Pen.) 4 

Illinois and Indiana 11*4 

(Less 154 for So. Ills.), if eliminated* 
Minn., No. and So. Dakota & Northern 

Peninsula of Mich 3 



Wisconsin 2 54 

Iowa and Nebraska .'*4 

E. Missouri 1 54 

W. Missouri and Kansas 3 

Col., Utah, Wyoming and New Mex. ... 1 *4 

Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Mont. ... 4 

Calif., Arizona and Nevadk :>54 

Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas '-54 

Louisiana & Mississippi 1 'A 

N. & S. Car., Ga., Fla., Ala. & Ten 4 

Canada 1 . 4 

FOREIGN 

Percentage Ratios for Continental Europe 



By David P. Howells 



Switzerland 
France .... 
Holland . . 

Egypt 

Belgium . . 
Italy 



Per Cent 
4 

. 24 
4 
4 
8 

. 16 



Sweden 12 

Norway 4 

Denmark 4 

Austria-Hungary 12 

Bulgaria and Turkey 8 

Mr. Howell makes clear that these estimates 
are approximate as it is impossible to establish 
any definite set of ratios, perfect beyond dispute. 
Russia and Germany are not included because the 
market in those countries is not open at present. 
Were those countries included or were trade le- 
strictions of various sorts, now existing, elimin- 
ated, these figures would be materially changed. 

Foreign Percentages 

(From Sidney Garrett, Inc.) 
Subject to change. 

Percentage 

England 50 

France-Switzerland 8 

Holland l'A 

Belgium 1 14 

Italy 2 

Russia 2 

Norway. Sweden, Denmark, Finland 7 

Germany 18 

Austria Hungary 3 

Czecho Slovakia 3 

Bulgaria & Turkey 1 

100 

Another Foreign Authority 
Continental Europe 

Per Cent 

France 25 

Holland 254 

Switzerland 2J4 

Belgium 5 

Russia 

Spain 4 

Portugal 2 

Italy 10 

Balkan States 

Egypt 2 

Germany 

Austria 

Norway 6 

Denmark 6 

Sweden 15 

Finland 2 

Entire Foreign Rights 

Per Cent 

Great Britain 35 

Cont. Europe 25 

Australia 10 

South America 15 

Entire Far East (incl. Islands) 8 

South Africa 3 

Mexico (incl. Central America) 2 

West Indies 2 



100 



255 



Wandsworth — Central Hall Circuit. 92 East Hill. 
General Manager, R. Simmons-Barker. Tele- 
grams, Whirlabout, Wands, London. Central 
Hall Picture House, Bromley Road, Catford • 
Central Hall Picture Palace, Onslow Street' 
Guildford; Central Hall Picture House, Acad- 
emy Street. Inverness; Central Hall Picture 
House. High Road, Lee; Central Hall Picture 
ialace. 3 Brighton Road. South Croydon; Cen- 
tral Hall Picture Palace, Portland Road. South 
-Norwood: Central Hall Picture Palace, High 
Road. Stamford Hill ; Central Hall Picture Pal- 
ace, Upper Tooting Road. S.W. ; Central Hall 
Picture Palace. Last Hill, Wandsworth; Cen- 
, ■ 1 Plcture House, King Street, Watford; 
Public Hall Cinema. .Memorial, Hastings; Vic- 
toria Hall Picture Palace, Archer St., Notting 
Hill. 

Glasgow— Cinema Supplies, Ltd., 105 St. Vincent 
d, &' s ', Charin g X, Glasgow ; Gaiety and 
Palace. Clydebank; Princess, Springburn, Glas- 
gow ; Portbrae Picture House, Pavilion and 
ine Picture House, Kirkcaldy; King's Kil- 
marnock; King's, Montrose; Palace, Arbroath- 
Globe, Brechin; Picture House, East Wemyss • 
Uueen s, Alexandria; Haymarket, Edinburgh-' 
Central Picture House, Govan, and Shawlands 
A .Picture House, Glasgow. 

Norwith— F H. Cooper and Co.'s Cinemas Ltd , 
Station C hambers. Managing Director, F H 
Cooper. Regent Theatre, Great Yarmouth: 
Electric Theatre, Norwich; Regent Theatre, 
Chelmsford; Central Cinema, Ipswich; Electric 
Theatre, Empire Theatre and Theatre Royal 
Kings Lynn ; Electric Theatre, Wisbech ; Film- 
land, Gorleston-on-Sea ; Empire Theatre- Nor- 
wich. 

Green's Filrn Service, 182 Trongate. Telegrfams, 
< arnival. Glasgow. Cinema, Tollcross, Cinema 
Kutherglen Road. Glasgow; Cinema. Alloa- Pic- 
turedrome, Whitevale, Picturedrome, Gorbals 
Picturedrome. Govan. Picturedrome, Bridge- 
ton, Glasgow; Picturedrome, Ayr; Picture- 
drome, Irvine; Picturedrome, Leven ; Pavilion 
Johnstone; La Scala, Aberdeen; Pavilion, Bath- 
gate. 

King (A. B.) Circuit. Lome Cinema, Govan 
Panopticon. Glasgow; Empire, Greenock- La 
Scala, Grangemouth ; New Cinema, Prestwick • 
Uueen s Cinema. Langside. Glasgow ; eD Luxe' 
Stevenston; De Luxe, Glasgow; Gaiety, Leith! 
Kound 1 oil Picturedrome. Casino, Elder Pic- 
ture House. Govan, Glasgow; Savoy, Dundee- 
Star. Partick, Glasgow; Theatre Royal, Coat- 
bridge. 

Leeds— New Century Pictures Ltd., 34 Welling- 
ton St. .Managing Director, Sydney H. Carter. 
St. George s Hall. Bradford; Grand Assemblv 
Kooms, Leeds: Picture House. Harrogate- Prin- 
cess Picture House. Barnsley ; Carlton Picture 
House. Wakefield; Corona Picture House West 
Gorton, Manchester; Albert Hall, Sheffield; 
Empire Palace, Barnsley: Coliseum, Leeds- 
City Picture House, Mount Pleasant Hall, Liv- 
erpool: Princess Hall, Shipley. 

OPINIONS ON FOREIGN OUT- 
LOOK 

Importation Will Internationalize 
Industry 

The importation of foreign-made films into this 
country will be the first step towards the interna- 
tionalization ot the motion picture industry Com- 
monly regarded as "the universal language " the 
business should by all means be made universal in 
scope. 

Importing productions made abroad into Amer- 
ca will undoubtedly tend to relieve the great need 
:or reciprocity. Exporting films turned out in the 
Lnited States serves to create a favorable impres- 
sion about this country everywhere. American 
ove. homes, ideals and characteristics taken up 
serve to make this land appear a desirable haven 
o the foreigner and causes an influx of immi- 
(rants. 

Producers abroad cannot hope to compete se- 
lously with American-made films here as yet be- 
cause few pictures made there are consistent 'with 
\mencan ideas There are some, however that 
ire up to the mark, and these should prove mar- 
:etable m the United States. Our standards are 



rapidly being recognized as the criterion and the 
only hope for foreign producers is to emulate us. 

PAUL H. CROMELIN, Inter-Ocean. 
Exchange Rates Foster Invasion 

While foreign films for general excellence are 
not comparable with those turned out in the 
United States, the best productions made in France. 
Italy and Germany rank with our superlative ef- 
forts, our standards being used as a criterion. An 
invasion of America by foreign producers is im- 
minent, however, present exchange rates making it 
possible to produce much more cheaply abroad. 

In France, an extravagant production can be 
made for 200.000 francs, which in American cur- 
rency would be about $14,000. Accessories there 
being generally very inexpensive, American direct- 
ors and technical men can demand large prices 
for their work, not bringing the cost of produc- 
tion up very much and insuring a high grade 
product there With foreigners taking advantage 
of this state, the local market will probably be 
affected by next season, the effect growing greater 
gradually. It is possible if not likely that a condi- 
tion such as once existed, with the majority of 
films here being foreign, may recur. 

English financiers are rapidly awakening to the 
possibilities of the motion picture and are backing 
the industry heavily. The French have a splendid 
section for film manufacturing in the Riviera, 
while Germany is progressing. Italian films are 
not marketable here. 

The exporting outlook for trashy productions 
is not favorable, but for good pictures there will 
always be room abroad. Americans have one 
great advantage — the population is cosmopolitan, 
making possible films with universal appeal. In 
England, France, Germany and other lands, the 
director, artists, performers and other people are 
almost invariably of the same nationality which 
make it difficult to give pictures an international 
coloring. 

Of course, American films are most popular in 
English speaking countries, about 75 per cent of 
those used in England being American, and in 
Australia about 90 per cent of the pictures shown 
being made in the United States. All countries 
excepting Germany and Russia are importing pro- 
ductions made here, and before long the market 
in those lands will be opened. 

DAVID P. HOWELLS. 
Exchange a Factor 

The question of the possibilities in the foreign 
market for American films is one that today re- 
quires mud more attention than it did during 
the years of the war. 

French and Italian producers are making very 
serious efforts to re-establish themselves in for- 
eign fields, this being especially noticeable in Latin 
America. British productions are appreciably on 
the increase. Germans just now are doing every- 
thing possible to get a foothold again. Although 
the majority of European films do not approach 
the average American productions, occasionally 
some special European productions meet with de- 
cided success. Two or three German films re- 
cently have been most favorably received through- 
out Brazil and Argentina. The Americans have 
fixed themselves very firmly in Latin America, and 
by giving proper attention to this market their 
position certainly can be maintained. With the 
existing rate of exchange, however, European pro- 
ducers are able to supply the Latin American mar- 
ket at a price sometimes one-half that asked by 
American concerns for the same class ofproduc- 
tions. Furthermore, European producers are far 
more lenient with their concessionaires, allowing as 
much as ninety days credit in some instances 
Willi the increasing amount of material which will 
henceforward undoubtedly be offered in the for- 
eign field, American producers may have to make 
considerable changes in their price schedules to 
meet foreign competition. 

The outlook for the next year is indeed prom- 
ising, though the great thing to be desired is not 
only the present business but the establishment of 
permanent relationships to extend indefinitely into 
the future. To obtain this end it will be necessary 
for the American producers seriously to consider 
the question of price adjustment and credit facili- 

" es - MAX GLUCKSMANN. 



WILLIAM DESMOND 

RECENT RELEASES 

"THE BROADWAY COWBOY" and "THE PARISH PRIEST" 

EARLY FALL RELEASE 
"WOMEN MEN LOVE" 



258 



Barnstyn's Views 

Different countries in Europe, as England. 
France, Italy, Germany, Scandinavian countries 
and Holland have since the end of the war, con- 
siderably increased the number of their own pro- 
ductions and principally Great Britain and France 
where the picture industry was very much ef- 
ected by the war, have fully recovered and are 
producing at present, more than they ever did. 

So have for instance, the Grangers Film Ser- 
vice. Lt., London, who never produced before, 
made an affiliation with the Hollamlia Filmfahriek 
in Haarlem. Holland, where about 20 productions 
yearly will be produced principally with English 
stars. 

Various French firms who stopped producing 
<luring the war have resumed work again and if 
I consider that Germany has been aide to do 
without any foreign productions during the four 
years of the war and since the armistice, up to 
the present moment on account of the embargo 
for the importation of foreign film not yet lifted, 
then this may show you that those countries can 
do eventually without any American production 
if they are forced to. 

A quite different matter, however, is for all 
countries here the importation of foreign made 
films is allowed and in those countries the Ameri- 
can productions are in great favor although a 
domestic production will most times have more 
value on account of names of authors and stars. 

Production in Europe may develop to any ex- 
tent. Nevertheless, it is my opinion that the bet- 
ter American productions will always find a ready 
market in the entire of Europe, unless exchange 
conditions do not make it prohibitive to buy the 
American pictures. 

On the other hand. I think that the American 
renting exchanges will have to change their pol- 
icies in distributing American productions exclu 
sively by purchasing also a number of foreign 
made productions, antl I am absolutely convinced 
that within a very short time, various foreign pro- 
ductions will be distributed in this country. 

The market in the United Kingdom suffers en- 
ormously on account of the advance booking 
system there and unless a good number of picture 
houses will be built within a few years, conditions 
will not change there at all. 

In France, conditions are very poor. To my 
opinion, there is not a single renting exchange in 
France who makes real profit and all those who 
are not backed up by own theaters, are bound to 
lose money. I don't think that any of the exist- 
ing exchanges in France are making money at 
all by themselves. 

I understand that the American producers who 
give their productions to French distributors on 
a sharing hasis are not so very satisfied with the 
results, and the reasons are, in the first place, the 
small amount of picture houses for such a big 
country, (about 1,200). the poor system of dis- 
tributing and the low renting prices on account 
of the competition. 

J. C. BARNSTYN, British & Colonial 

Trading Co. 

Ziehm's Interesting Views 

In answering your question, "What do you 
think of the possibilities of foreign films in 
America?" I would say that they are becoming 
a decidedly more important factor in this country 
than they have been for many years. Even now. 
a number of elaborate European pictures have 
been secured for American distribution and more 
are on the way. If would not be suprising if 
foreign competition, providing the films prove 
acceptable to the American taste, will tend to 
lower rentals. The ultimate success of European 
pictures in this country must, of course, depend 
upon their merit when compared to the product 
of our own studios. 

The question, "Do you believe the export field 
will be a prosperious one for the next year?" may 
be combined with the next question. "What do 
you think of the attitude of American producers 
toward the foreign market ?" I have consistently 
maintained that there is much undue pessimism 
about the foreign market because of the unsettled 
conditions following the war, and the unsatisfac- 



tory exchange rates. The market is still there to 
be developed and the success of American distrib- 
utors must depend largely upon the tact with 
which they approach prospective buyers. There 
is no doubt about the average American picture 
being superior to the average of any other country ; 
but the days of monopoly, such as existed during 
the war, are over. 

The take-it-or-leave-it attitude that our distnli- 
utors too frequently have adapted when dealing 
willi the European trade must give way to gen 
uine salesmanship conducted by men who recog- 
nize the business customs and traditions of the 
countries in which they are operating. Granting 
this business acumen. I see no reason why the 
export field should not be an extremely lucrative 
one for American producers. 

The pictures that score the greatest success, 
will, of course, be those that have the most appeal 
in dealin with fundamental human emotions, 
rather than with subjects too closely connected 
with our local life. In practically all European 
countries there is a steady demand for good 
American dramas and comedies, and this demand 
will increase with the completion of the new 
theater now being erected. 

ARTHUR ZIF.HM. Goldwyu, 

Something to Think About 

F'oreign productions must inevitably reduce 
America's foreign sales. In the past 3 or 4 years 
there have been none ; now they are steadily com- 
ing into the market from various countries, and 
unless the world buys more. America must sell 
less, especially as there is also a tendency not 
to produce as much in the U. S. A, Foreign 
productions will offer as a set off to American ex- 
cellence, change of artists, treatment, atmosphere 
and story which foreign countries will welcome. 
The frequently expressed idea that foreign coun- 
tries are years behind America in production 
methods may be quite true, but it isn't merely 
production that makes sales. Much excellent pro- 
duction has been wasted on worthless or unsuit- 
able stories. Good stories and treatment of 
dramatic possibilities will excuse — temporarily at 
any rate -many technical shortcomings and in 
1 lie meantime Europe will catch up. Already 
American producers are being attracted there: 
more will follow and there are good men there that 
will get backing. 

America's method of conducting foreign sales 
has in the past not done much to ensure future 
good will. In many cases foreign buyers have to 
deal with brokers or middlemen who have no 
interest in anything beyond the royalty they can 
collect for franchise rights. Delivery of prints, 
advertising and accessories does not concern them, 
they merely pass orders along to other firms and 
consider the transaction settled. It never enters 
these gentlemens heads that in many countries 
they have no rights to sell at all. should the picture 
not meet with the approval of the censor there, 
and there is an obvious reluctance and in some 
cases a refusal to allow credit for pictures which 
are not permitted to enter a country but are held 
by the customs when rejected by censor, and have 
consequently to be returned to America. 

Does the American foreign market salesman 
concern himself about difficulties of transport? 
Does it matter to him that any foreign country 
can send film here by mail or between themselves 
but no films can be mailed from here to foreign 
countries? Is he at all sympathetic about the 
varying rates of exchange and the cost of paying 
dallors here? 

Does he worry because a Laboratory treats 
the buyer as though he were a crook trying to 
beat it for something and ships its prints to him 
C. O. D., without warning; demanding cash and 
even through its agents refusing to accept certified 
checks in payment. 

Not at all ! These petty details that mean so 
much to most foreign buyers do not keep the 
American film merchant awake at nights. Th.jse 
of us who have had the experience of buying in 
various countries cannot help contrasting America's 
arbitrary attitude and lack of courtesy with the 



259 




DORIS PAWN 

RECENT RELEASES 

"TOBY'S BOW" "THE STRANGE BOARDER" 

EARLY FALL RELEASES 

"ROSA ALVARA" "LI TING LANG" 

and Betty Compson's second starring vehicle to be released by Goldwyn 



very different treatment accorded by the traders 
of other markets where the hold up game is not 
practised so vigorously and business is done on 
far more equitable methods. 

American film men should not delude them- 
selves. Reorganization of their foreign sales 
methods will not save them, but may do some- 
thing towards placing their productions on a more 
equal footing with those of foreign countries. 
Picture for picture foreign countries will produce 
at far less cost than American studios because 
living conditions and general overhead — unreason- 
ably inflated here — are much less expensive there. 
Difference between the pictures themselves, if in 
favor of America technically, will be more than 
equalized by the change of story, artist, method 
of treatment and atmosphere and last but not least, 
the very much better, more painstaking, more 
courteous and more equitable treatment accorded 
to buyers than is on the average offered by 
American merchants. There are exceptions of 
course, but these only go to emphasize more 
emphatically the shortcomings of the majority and 
it is the majority that usually largely influence 
trade. 

W. A. ROBBINS. 
Co-operative Film Exchange, Ltd. 

Only Italy Can Hope to Compete With 
U. S. 

American productions are the best in the world 
to-day and there need be no fear of foreign com- 
petition in the United States for some time to 
come. In Italy, however, the climate and atmos- 
phere are so good, the studio accomodations of 
such a calibre, that with sound American organiza- 
tion, American direction and management, that 
nation can undoubtedly become a competitor. 

As far as histori f aI pictures are concerned, 
Italy ranks first, with France running second. The 
Germans have produced some fair films, but 
there is too much sex work in them, and there is 
little danger of their affecting the local market 
very seriously. 

One fact has been established — American pic- 
tures will ge will anywhere. In Italy there is 
great enthusiasm over them. Fairbanks, whom 
they call "Lampo" (lighting) and Mary Pickford 
being very popular. They like slapstick comedy 
there also. 

The only hope for foreign producers is to co- 
operate with Americans, and work according to 
United States standards. An effort to make art 
the principal feature rather than business, is the 
greatest fault in Italy in whi c h the industry ranks 
third in importance. Next year's outlook is 
splendid for the export and importing business 
and I look to very favorable results. 

FERDINAND O. V. LUPORINI. 

Exchange a Problem 

"There is no established list of foreign per- 
centages on productions. In certain foreign ter- 
ritories such as the Far East and South America 
certain productions, regardless of their merits, 
bring the same price. For instance, all serials in 
South America bring substantially the same fig- 
ure. The price does not vary more than $500 
either way and the same applies to programmed 
features. In England there is a maximum figure 
that can be paid for even the best of attractions. 

"There is no staple percentage and prices vary 
only because conditions vary so that each propo- 
sition must be based upon current conditions. 

"As long as American producers maintain their 
present high average of production and even excel 
present productions, they will always have a sure 
footing in the foreign market. 

"However, foreign films of merit will find a 
more ready reception in the United States than 
they have received heretofore. 

"The export field will be prosperous because 
among other reasons the import field will be en- 
larged and the reciprocity of the motion picture 
industry with respect to export and import will 
follow. The American producer will, however, 
regulate to a greater extent than heretofore the 
method of foreign exploitation because Americans 
will produce in foreign countries. 



"But Export and import will not be reduced to 
a profitable or sure basis until there is a more 
staple rate of exchange and it behooves the Amer- 
ican producers to urge its influence upon Congress 
to engage in a trade or exchange agreement with 
foreign countries. This, not alone to protect the 
American producer or exporter, but also the for- 
eign buyer. The motion picture industry has not 
wielded the influence it possesses and is altogether 
unmindful of its power, its privileges and its 
rights. Congress has enacted laws to protect 
other interests that export its merchandise; so, 
too, should Congress be called upon to protect the 
fifth largest industry in the United States. That 
too little consideration is given by our Govern- 
ment to the export and import trade as far as it 
applies to motion pictures is proven by the mea- 
ger, slipshod and unsatisfactory information fur- 
nished by American Consuls in foreign countries 
concerning conditions as far as they apply to the 
motion picture industry existing in the countries 
of their assignment. The Export Division of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission possesses little 
or no reliable data concerning the industry in for- 
eign countries, and from where else can we secure 
our information, if not from our own Govern- 
ment ?" 

THE FROHMAN AMUSEMENT CORP. 

Wm. L. Sherrill President. 

Outlook Promising 

"The question of the possibilities in the foreign 
market for American films is rjne that today re- 
quires much more attention than it did during 
the years of the war. 

"French and Italian producers are making very 
efforts to re-establish themselves in foreign fields, 
this being especially noticeable in Latin America. 
British productions are appreciably on the in- 
crease. Germans just now are doing everything 
possible to get a foothold again. Although the 
majority of European films do not approach the 
average American productions, occasionally some 
special European productions meet with decided 
success. Two or three German films recently 
have been most favorably received throughout 
Brazil and Argentina. The Americans have 
fixed themselves very firmly in Latin America, 
and by giving proper attention to this market 
their position certainly can be maintained. With 
the existing rate of exchange, however, European 
producers are able to supply the Latin American 
market at a price sometimes one-half that asked 
by American concerns for the same class of pro- 
ductions. Furthermore, European producers are 
far more lenient with their concessionaires, allow- 
ing as much as ninety days' credit in some in- 
stances. With the increasing amount of material 
which will henceforward undoubtedly be offered 
in the foreign field, American producers may have 
to make considerable changes in their price sched- 
ules to meet foreign competition. 

"The outlook for the next year is indeed prom- 
ising, though the great thing to be desired is not 
only the present business but the establishment 
of permanent relationships to extend indefinitely 
into the future. To obtain this end it will be 
necessary for the American producers seriously to 
consider the question of price adjustment and 
credit facilities." 

JACOBO GLUCKSMANN. 
Expansion Anticipated by Shauer 

The gradual improvement in exchange rates and 
indications that the nations of the world are suc- 
ceeding in bringing about a satisfactory readjust- 
ment of business conditions on a peace basis, give 
promise of a record-breaking increase in the film 
export business during the coming year. 

"Despite the unsettled business conditions exist- 
ing in the world, the foreign business of Famous 
Players has shown a tremendous increase in ihe 
last year, and we expect a continuation of this 
record-breaking growth in the coming year," said 
Mr. Shauer. "The international appeal of Para- 
mount Artcraft is indicated by the fact that it is 
becoming necessary to increase and improve our 
distributing facilities in all sections of the world 
in order to meet this demand. Much time and 
attention will be given to the improving of the 
distributing organization. g SHAUER 

Famous Players. 



261 



L 

E 

W 
I 

S 

s. 

s 

T 

o 

N 
E 



RECENT RELEASES 

"Held by the Enemy" - Lasky 
"Milestones" ------ Goldwyn 

"Beau Revell" ------ Ince 

"The River's End" - - - Marshall Neilan 

COMING RELEASES 
"Nomads of the North" - David M. Hartford 

A JAMES OLIVER CURWOOD PRODUCTION 

"No Drums Were Heard" - Marshall Neilan 
"Bob Hampton of Placer" Marshall Neilan 




262 



David M. Hartford 

Directing 

JAMES OLIVER CURWOOD 
PRODUCTIONS 



FOR FIRST NATIONAL 




Nineteen Nineteen Release 

"BACK TO GOD'S COUNTRY" 

Jl First National Special 



Nineteen Twenty Release 
"NOMADS OF THE NORTH" 

Nineteen Twenty-One Release 
"THE GOLDEN SNARE" 



263 



Here is the most remarkable cast ever assembled 
for a single motion picture 



LILLIAN GISH 
RICHARD BARTHELMESS 
MARY HAY . 
BURR McINTOSH 
LOWELL SHERMAN 
CREIGHTON HALE 
PORTER STRONG 



JOSEPHINE BERNARD 
GEORGE NEVILLE 
EDGAR NELSON 
KATE BRUCE 
FLORENCE SHORT 
VIVIA OGDEN 
EMILY FITZROY 



ALL PERSONALLY DIRECTED BY 

D. W. GRIFFITH 

FOR HIS MAGNIFICENT ELABORATION OF 

"WAY DOWN EAST" 

From the stage play by Lottie Blair Parker and Joseph R. 
Grismer. Presented for twenty-two years by William |A. 
Brady. 

THE SOCIETY SCENES A RIOT OF SPLENDOR 
AND ELEGANCE, DISPLAYING A COSTLY ARRAY 
OF GOWNS BY LUCILLE AND FURS FROM THE 
ESTABLISHMENT OF OTTO KAHN, INC., OF NEW 
YORK. 



THE SNOW AND FLOATING ICE SCENES DE- 
CLARED THE MOST MARVELOUS EVER SECURED 
IN THE WORLD HISTORY OF MOTION PICTURES. 



THE MOST PROFOUND 

GRIFFITH PRODUCTION 

SINCE "HEARTS OF THE WORLD" 



For Full Information Address ALBERT L. GREY, General Manager 

D. W. GRIFFITH, INCORPORATED 
Suite 303 Longacre Building, 1480 Broadway, New York City 



264 



Paramount's Foreign Offices 

Offices and allied organizations for the distribu- 
tion of Paramount Artcraft pictures are as fol- 
lows : 

Famous Player-Lasky Service, Ltd., distributors, 
for Great Britain and Ireland, with offices in Lon- 
don, Liverpool, Manchester, Birmingham, Cardie, 
Leeds, Newcastle and Dublin. 

The Famous-Laskly Film Service, Ltd., dis- 
tributors for Canada, with offices at Toronto, Mon- 
treal, St. John., Winnipeg, Calgary and Van- 
couver. 

Feature Films, Ltd., distributor for Australasia, 
with offices at Sydney, Adelaide. Perth, Melbourne, 
Brisbane, in Australia, Wallington in New Zea- 
land and Hobart in Tasmania. 

Societe des Etablisements Gaumont, distributors 
for France, Belgium, Holland, Switzerland, French 
Colonies and protectorates Egypt and Asia Minor, 
with offices at Paris, Lyons, Toulouse, Berdeaux, 
Marsaille, Lille, Nantes, Nancy, Strassbourg, all 
in France ; Brussels, Belgium, Geneva, Switzer- 
land and Cairo, Egypt. 

Famous Players-Lasky Corp., distributors for 
Denmark, Sweden. Norway and Finland, with 
offices at Copenhagen, Denmark, Stockholm, 
Sweden and Christiania, Norway. 

Sociedad General Cinematografica, distributors 
for Spain, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay, 
with offices at Barcelone, Spain ; Buenos Aires, 
Argentine and Montevidee, Uruguay. 

Policulas D'Luxe' America De Sul., distribu- 
tors for Brazil, with offices at Rio De Janerire 
and Sac Paulo. 

South Pacific Paramount Co., distributors for 
Chile, Bolivia and Peru with offices at Santiago, 
Chile. 

Caribbean Film, distributors for Cuba, West 
Indians, Veneezuela, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, 
Guztemala. San Salvador and Honduras, with 
offices at Havana, Cuba and San Juan, Port Rico. 

Continental film Co., distributors for Mexico, 
with offices at Mexico City. 

Nippon Kataudo-Shasin Kaisha, distributors for 
Japan, with offices at Tokyo. 

International Films 

The future points toward great international 
films; it will be these films which will contribute 
to the development of the moving picture trade 
in 1921. 

Next year, the European editors in the hope of 
regaining the place which they held on the Ameri- 
can market before the war will edit in additi >n 
to their national production great international 
films which will rival the most important produc- 
tions made in America today. 

We are not without realizing the progressive 
effort of our competitors overseas, and we are 
making the necessary efforts not to allow any dis- 
tance to exist between us. 

Several large American firms, following the 
example of the Famous Players which is already 
established in London, are building studios in 
France and Italy. 

A new moving picture era is beginning 

Like Art, cinematography will belong to no par- 
ticular country. With a view to universal diffu- 
sion, the subject of scenarios will become inter- 
nationalized and by this very fact will be elevated, 
humanized. 

Scenes will be taken not only in the exa:t 
artistic reconstitution of the interiors but in the 
real sites where the action takes place. The 
future exigencies of the screen will abolish dis- 
tances and frontiers. We will then no longer see 
m studios nor in the open the reconstruction of 
expensive sets representing a European citv or 
an Oriental panorama. 

The international moving picture companies 
which are now forming will work as well on the 
banks of the Thames as on the shores of the 
Tiber. Paris will no longer be represented by a 
vague night cabaret scene, but by scenes taken 
at the Champs Elysees, at Montmartre, as will 
be the case at Cairo, Brussels, on the Bosphorous, 
or in the Alpes. 

The fusion of international interpreters will lend 
an increase of truth and charm to the distribution 
of these coming films, which will, certainly, by 



the diversity of scenes and the new technical means 
used the compete for success, obtain the approval 
of all publics. 

Let us hope, therefore, for the coming of tbe 
international film, whose success will contribute 
in a large degree to the developmentof the industry 
of the Silent Art. 

LEONCE PERRET. 



BUREAU OF COMMERCE 
REPORTS 

It is suggested that those interested in the 
export and import field should communicate with 
the Bureau of Commerce, Washington, D. C, 
and make application to receive the commerce re- 
ports issued by this bureau and which from time 
to time contain informative and helpful data bear- 
ing on the industry. Among the more interest- 
ing reports issued by this bureau during the past 
year are the following : 

The Motion Picture Business in Germany 

(Counsul Frederick Simpich, on duty with 
American Commission, Berlin, Feb. 20, 1920.) 

No other industry in Germany has been so 
active in the past 14 months as the film business. 
The motion-picture theaters in the larger cities 
handle enormous crowds every night. Few for- 
eign films are shown because of the present law 
prohibiting their importation. After May, 1920, 
it is understood that foreign films may be im- 
ported. It is reported that the president of the 
Universum Film Co., which is one of the largest 
in Europe, is proceeding to the United States to 
buy American films for exhibition in central 
Europe. 

The German Authors' League, whose member- 
ship includes practically all reputable German 
authors and playwrights, has signed a contract 
with an American theatrical concern giving it the 
sole right to film their stories and plays in 
America and to market them throughout the 
world (including Germany) ; these German authors 
and playwrights receiving in turn advance cash 
payments and subsequent royalties. This same 
American theatrical group has also contracted with 
certain famous German and Austrian composers 
and directors for work in America. 

Number and Character of Theaters 

There are about 600 playhouses in the country 
and about 3,200 motion-picture theaters. Less 
than 3 per cent of the old theaters have been con- 
verted into "movie"houses. Most of the picture 
theaters are divided roughly in three classes : 

(1) Small family theaters, in provincial towns, 
where the admission runs from 550 pfennigs to 
l'/ 2 marks. 

(2) Second-class theaters, where the admission 
runs from 1J4 to 6 and 8 marks, including a 
luxury tax of 20 to 25 per cent. 

(3) The high-class playhouses of Berlin, Leip- 
zig, et., where the admission runs as high as 15 
marks or more. 

The motion-picture theaters of Berlin are more 
comfortable than the average first-class motion- 
picture house in America. For example, loges with 
four armchairs will occupy as much floor space 
in a German theater as 10 seats in the average 
American theater. Much open space is also given 
over to aisles, promenades, lobbies, etc. ; also 
larger and better orchestras are provided. 

In the provincial towns many very small pic- 
ture theaters are in operation, some with a seat- 
ing capacity as low as 100; the larger picture 
houses in the cities have a maximum seating 
capacity of 2,400. The estimated seating capacity 
of all the motion-picture theaters in Germany is 
1,000,000. When the average price per seat and 
the general crowded conditions of the theaters are 
considered, some idea of the enormous sum spent 
annually in Germany on motion-picture tickets 
can be gained. 

Organization of the Industry and Sala- 
ries Paid 

The salaries paid to stars and famous directors 
in Germany (considering the depreciated mark) 
are very small compared with American salaries; 
well-known directors receive from 40,000 to 
200,000 marks a year. Average performers reg- 



265 



BILLY BITZER 




Shooting A Scene 
For 



Way 



Down 

East" 



D. W. GRIFFITH 
PRODUCTIONS 



266 



ularly employed by producing companies receive 
from 40,000 " to 60,000 marks per annumn ; the 
highest-priced "movie" stars are said to receive 
between 300,000 and -400,000 marks a year. 

Some of the best directors are also stock- 
holders in the producing corporations. Bonuses 
are sometimes paid to directors, provided they 
complete a picture within a specifid time. A 
good director is at a premium in Germany, as in 
the United States. The highest-priced camera 
men receive about 40 marks a day ; 125 marks a 
day is about the average salary. 

Some of the German performers work for two 
or three companies during the same day, going 
from one studio to another and playing various 
parts in widely differing productions. Nearly all 
the "movie" players in Germany, and especially 
the better ones, are still connected with the legiti- 
mate stage. Most of the stars are tied up on long 
contracts. 

Prc-War Imports of Films — Studio 
Conditions 

Previous to the war, and, in fact, during the 
first years of the war, American pictures were very 
popular in Germany, especially the cowboy and 
animal pictures. However, prior to the war the 
number of pictures sent to Germany from the 
United States was not particularly large, on ac- 
count of producing conditions in the United 
States and the large domestic demand. 

The present law borbidding the importation of 
foreign-made films up till May, 1920, was passed 
at the instigation of the 200 or more film exchanges 
and producers of films in Germany : but the pub- 
lic demand for foreign films is such that it seems 
unlikely this law will be extended beyond May, 
1920. 

Previous to the war Italian and French pictures 
were also popular in Germany, hut none is now 
on exhibition, and German theatrical men say 
that public prejudice will prevent the exhibit of 
French-made pictures for a long time. 

The studios in Germany are small and poorly 
equipped, compared with American studios, but 
they are improving. During the summer time the 
German studios enjoy practically the same con- 
ditions of sunlight for photography as prevail in 
America, but winter conditions are more difficult. 
The Ufa and Bioscop corporations have studios 
in Berlin (where the are 11 large studios in all) 
that are well built, lighted by electricity, and 
operated throughout the season of poor sunlight. 
Certain German companies have been sent to the 
Mediterranean countries to make pictures, for the 
sake of better sunlight and different scenery. There 
are in all Germany about 25 big studios. The 
camera work is good, the costuming is very good, 
and the building of sets and decorations is excel- 
lent ; but the criticisms of German-made films 
most often heard from American experts are: 
(1) Lack of action and speed; (2) titles are too 
long and the films themselves often run an inter- 
minable length of 10 or 12 acts; (3) the use of 
an undue proportion of melodrama and tragedy. 
American motion-picture investigators in Ger- 
many state that American comedy pictures would 
undoubtedly meet with an enormous success in 
(iermany. 

Distribution of Films 

Germany is divided into six sections for the dis- 
tribution of films by the big companies: The films 
are sent out by express, but are not insured by 
the companies, and their delivery to the subscrib- 
ing theaters is less accurate and speedy than in 
the United States. There is a minimum price for 
the rental of films, but no maximum, the increase 
being in proportion to the attendance. 

The larger producers and manufacturers have 
signed contracts with many of the theaters to 
use their films exclusively from now till 1921. 
Many of the smaller theaters have refused to sign 
these contracts, the owners declaring that they 
wish eventually to secure American pictures. The 
opinion is general among informed persons that, 
except for certain local producers and manu- 
facturers, there exists throughout Germany a 
great demand for American films. This demand 
is realized, and it is said the Ufa Corporation has 
already bought and is now making payment on 



75 American films, which it hopes to import after 
May, 1920, when the film embargo is lifted. 

Films are not distributed on credit in Ger- 
many. The producer requires an inital deposit for 
the option for the territory, and when the film is 
delivered the balance in cash is collected. 

Influence of American Films and Methods 

The German producers and exhibitors keep close 
watch on the motion-picture situation in the 
United States. They know all about the so- 
called American invasion and conquest of the 
picture field in England, and they anticipate an 
American invasion of Geermany. Practically all 
of the reputable American moving-picture mag- 
azines and journals reach Germany; many Ameri- 
can moving-picture men have also investigated 
this field lately, and through these and other 
sources the German producers are in close touch 
with the trend of film affairs in the United States. 
When a famous American picture arouses interest 
in Denmark or some nearby country, the German 
film interests send their observers up to watch its 
success and earning powers. Certain well-known 
American stories have been adapted to the films in 
Germany, the same plot and characters being 
used, but the title being changed. An American 
moving-picture expert recently here investigating 
conditions, says that the influence of American 
"movie" rat is most noticeable in Germany; that 
even within the past few months a marked im- 
provement in plotting,- costuming, action, photo- 
graphy, settings, and especially continuity is 
very noticeable. 

Theater Tax — Industrial Films for Adver- 
tising Purposes 

The method of taxing theater tickets and mak- 
ings returns to the Government authorities is about 
the same in Germany as in the United States ; and, 
notwithstanding the economic distress of Ger- 
many the crowds at the "movie" theaters seem 
to be increasing. One German economist states 
that this is due to the general "forget-the-war" 
feeling. An American investigator lately found 
nearly every picture house in Germany running 
to capacity and the Berlin theaters turning away 
hundreds every night. 

The Deutches Lichbilt at Berlin is a German 
moving-picture advertising concern, backed by 
the Government and certain private corporations 
such as the Krupps, which produces and distributes 
industrial films. This concern has endeavored to 
advertise German industries in South America and 
other foreign countries by distributing such films. 
Within the last few months it has also begun in- 
dustrial educational work in Germany. This con- 
cern has lately taken over the National Pictorial 
News Weekly, which corresponds to the Hearst- 
Pathe News. An arrangement has been made 
between the Deutches Lichtbilt Co. and an 
.\merican company to exchange weekly news 
films — news films not being excluded under the 
em argo. 

It is reliably reported that in a very few in- 
stances negatives have been made (called "dupes" 
or "replicas") from certain American positive films, 
originally sold for exhibition in neutral European 
countries and that prints made from these neg- 
atives were later smuggled into Germany. 

Operatives in Motion Picture Business 
Are Organized 

Certain unions or organizations exist among 
theatrical employees in Germany. The actors are 
organized into the " Buhnengenossenschaft," and 
the musicians, stage hands, etc., are organized into 
what is known as the "Centralverband der Kin- 
iandestellter." The musicians in the orchestras 
are further controlled by the German Musician's 
Union. Theatrica' ushers also belong to a union, 
hut their wages are small, seldom running over 
10 marks a day; they are expected to make up for 
this small salary by the sale of programs ; also, 
as in other European theaters, the German ushers 
expect a tip for showing patrons to their seats. 

A new film industry lately developed in Ger- 
many is the so-called "home film;" that is, the 
manufacture and distribution of a small cheap ap- 
paratus for furnishing moving-picture entertain- 
ment in private homes. This industry has lately 



267 



GLADYS HULETTE 

with D. W. GRIFFITH 



268 



been interrupted by a police regulation, which 
controls 'he exhibition of films. 

According to recent press reports, Berlin will 
soon possess the largest film studio in the world. 
The Albatross Kircraft Works in Johannisthal are 
transforming their airship hangar into a moving- 
picture studio; this studio will be about 450 feet 
long and nearly 200 feet wide. 

Argentine 

In Buenos Aires alone there are 131 moving- 
picture theaters, and almost every town and sub 
urb of the Republic now has its "cine" theater. 
Therefore, commercila organizations would do 
will to aid the film companies in sending into 
Argentina those pictures that are not only inter 
esting in plot but also valuable as far-reaching 
advertising mediums. 

British Purchase of German Cinema 
Interests 

It is reported in the London Daily Express that 
Maj. Norman Holden and Mr. J. C. Graham (the 
latter of the Famous Players-Lasky Corporation) 
have, acting for British interests, "purchased 
from the Germans their holdings in more than 
150 cinema theaters in foreign countries." It is 
stated that the theaters are located in Bulgaria. 
Roumania, Serbia, Holland, Poland, Turkey, Den- 
mark, and Switzerland. 

Motion Picture Company Organized in 
Peru 

A joint-stock company has been organized under 
the laws of Peru for the purpose of producing 
motion-picture films. The company has a well 
equipped laboratory capable of developing and 
printing 1,500 feet of film per day. Cameras and 
operators have been obtained from New York 
and several well-known American actors and ac- 
tresses have been engaged. (The name and id- 
dress of the general manager have been supplied 
by Vice Counsul James H. Roth and may be ob- 
tained by referring to file No. 6672. 

Motion Pictures in Japan 

Japan offers a good market for moving-picture 
films, as there are about 600 houses, practically all 
controlled by two circuits, which show films reg- 
ularly in addition to the two or three thousand 
theaters in which moving pictures are shown oc- 
casionally. In the larger cities the daily attend- 
ance at each cinema averages 1,000 persons. Prices 
of admission vary from 5 to 30 cents, children 
under 15 and soldiers and sailors being admitted 
at half rates. From $100 to $500 ins paid by the 
theaters as monthly film rental, for which they 
receive enough reels to make a varied program, 
changed weekly. 

Switzerland 

(Counsul Francis R. Stewart, Berne.) 
Motion pictures have not, as yet, penetrated to 
all sections of Switzerland, but reports show that 
progress is being made from day to day. The 
war had a very istmulating effect upon the in- 
dustry, all the belligerent countries having used 
this means for propaganda work ; and while no 
one can state what effect this propaganda had 
upon indvidual opinion regarding the war. it lias 
had the result of converting the people to this 
form of amusement. Compared with other coun- 
tries and considering the population. Switzerland 
possesses to-day a relatively small number of 
motion-picture theaters and none at all of any 
great seating capacity. As a result, the smaller 
houses are very well patronized and their owners 
are apparently making large profits. 

Film Rentals — Government Censorship 

The independent theaters lease their films at 
prices ranging from 0.40 francs to 2 francs ner 
meter (meter=3.28 feet) per week, but for 
special features a percentage of the gross receipts 
of the theater is demanded. As in the United 
States, the age of the film affects the price. The 
practice of having a regular program at a fixed 
rental is not followed in this country. The ex- 
changes buy the films, with exclusive display rights, 
from the producing companies (generally only one 
copy, as the territory is small) and hold the per- 
son showing the films responsible for their safe 
return to the exchange. Worn-out films are de- 



stroyed when beyond repair, but the purchasing 
exchange has the right to make reproductions it 
it so desires. 

Each new film requires the approval of a Gov- 
ernment censor in each city or Canton before it 
can be shown. This service must be paid for in 
some places, while in others it is given free. No 
special days are fixed for the release of new films 
as in the United States, but, naturally, the import- 
ing exchanges give their own theaters first call. 
Advertising matter must be paid for by the the- 
aters. 

(The names of two publications in Switzerland 
devoted to the motion picture industry, and a 
list of names of the leading dealers in motion- 
picture films in Switzerland may be obtained from 
the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce 
or its district or co-operative offices by referring 
to file No. 1300039.) 

Belgium 

(Vice Counsul Charles W. Drew, Jr., Brussels, 
Dec. 23, 1919.) 

American motion pictures have proved ex- 
tremely popular in Belgium and are at the present 
time shown regularly at most of the best Belgian 
picture theaters. Films are generally purchased 
in Beligum with an exclusive right (monopoly) 
clause secured by contract. The duration of this 
contract is, as a rule, from three to five years. 
Quotations are preferred per meter, that being the 
unit of measurement of the country. Belgian pur- 
chasers seldom desire more than two copies of a 
film, Comedies are usually purchased in a single 
copy, while dramas which promise to be sufficiently 
interesting are taken in duplicate. The usual price 
for single copies of ordinary films is 1.50 to 1.75 
francs per meter. The number of reels in a 
drama is said to be of no great importance ; the 
feature films, however, are generally in the vi- 
cinity of 1.500 meters in length. Comedies range 
from 500 to 800 meters. Films in episodes (series 
pictures) are proving popular in Belgium, 
especially in the provincial cities. 

There is at the present time no censor for mo- 
tion pictures in Belgium, but the advisability of 
appointing one is being strongly considered by 
the Chambre des Deputes. 

Kinds of Films Demanded 

Films dealing with religion, except when well 
handled from the broad standpoint of Christianity 
in general, are not in demand. Themes involving 
political questions, drunkenness, murders, etc., 
are not popular. It is only exceptionally good 
films of the war that are still interesting, the pub- 
lic have ceased to demand pictures of this sort. 

The most popular screen subjects in Belgium 
at this time in the approximate order of their ap- 
peal are: (1) Society dramas, especially when 
rich in luxurious scenes, furnishings, etc. ; (2) mel- 
odramas with rapid, forceful action; (3) com- 
edies, particularly the exceedingly comical variety ; 
(4) dramatic comedies with rapid action; (5) 
Far West (cowboy) scenes, if low in price; (6) 
detective dramas in limited numbers, and (7) 
series pictures at a moderate price. Dramas with 
wild animals and thrilling situations, as well as 
circus pictures, are also in moderate demand. 

American films have been well received in Bel- 
gium. During the war many French firms pur- 
chased American films, with exclusive rights for 
France and Belgium, and all these films have been 
introduced on the Belgian market since the arm- 
istice. French films are well known also, and 
there is a limited number received from Italian. 
Norwegjan. Swedish, and Danish producers. At 
the presenttime no German films are on the mar- 
ket, but it is predicted that two or three strong 
German producers will make every effort to re- 
gain their former business here. 

There are 811 motion-picture theaters in Bel- 
gium ; but outside of the larger cities, such as 
Brussels, Antwerp, Liege and Ghent, many of 
these play only three days a week, generally on 
Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. Very few 
of the theaters are equipped with organs. Music 
js furnished generally by either a piano or an 
orchestra. Tn a few of the better theaters in the 
large cities the music is made something of a 
feature. 



269 



LOUIS C. BITZER 

Cinematographer 



With D. W. GRIFFITH 

"Romance" "Coincidence" 



PAUL H. ALLEN, U. S. C. 

CINEMATOGRAPHER 
SE 

David Work Griffith Productions ■ 

"IDOL DANCER" "THE LOVE FLOWER" 

"WAY DOWN EAST" 

Photographed Robert Harron in the "Brass Boici" 
Own 1920 Bell-Howell and Pathe Camera 

D. W. Griffith Studio 
Mamaroneck, N. Y. 



270 



The best-known and most-used projectors are 
those manufactured by the French firms of Pathe, 
Gaumont. and the German firm of Hernemanti. 
The writer has been informed that Belgium offers 
an excellent market for American projection ap- 
paratus if it can be handled through a depot In 
Brussels, carrying a small but representative 
stock. 

The Belgian motion -picture jndustry is organized 
under the Chambre Syndicate de la Cinemato- 
graphic, Palais de la Bourse de Commerce, Brux- 
elles. Practically all Belgian motion-picture men 
are members of this organization. 

Suggestions to Motion Picture Producers 
Selling Films in China 

A suggestion has been made by Consul Stuart 
J. Fuller. Tientsin, that the interest in movjng 
pictures in China could be considerably increased 
by inserting well-worded Chinese texts in addition 
to those in English. There are at present about 
half a dozen motion-picture theaters jn Tientsin, 
of which the leading foreign house has a capacity 
of 600. and the Chinese ones seat from 500 to 
2,000 people and give two shows daily. Films 
from most of" the larger American companies are 
exhibited, the popularity of the stars being about 
the same as in the United States. 

Constantinople 

(Consul General G. Bie Ravndal, Constantinople) 
The first cinema was installed in Constantinople 
in 1905. It enjoyed a great success. A few 
months later one of the theaters, with the largest 
seating capacity, was almost entirely given over to 
moving picture shows. The majority of the films 
projected belonged to the firm Pathe Freres. To- 
day there are 11 moving picture theaters in Con- 
stantinople, besides smaller halls temporarily 
mounted. 

There are now four importers of films in Con- 
stantinople, all of whom have agents in Smprna 
and in a few other cities in Asia Minor. The Cine- 
Theatrale Corporation has correspondents in Ath- 
ens, Sofia, and Bucharest, as they sometimes buy 
films on a royalty basis with exclusive rights tor 
the Balkan States. 

Usually all films are bought on a royalty basis. 
A single print is purchased, which is projected in 
one or two local theaters and then used for one 
year at least in all the moving picture halls of 
Smyrna, Beirut, Trebizond and other cities of the 
country. 

According to the style of the film and popu- 
larity of the performers, films are paid for at rates 
varying between 6 to 9 cents a foot. From 1,600 
to 2,000 yards, divided into four or five reels, is 
the most desirable length of a film. Serial films 
are now successfully introduced ; most of these are 
detective dramas of a total length of 9,000 to 
10.000 yards, divided into 25-30 reels. 

There is no censorship of moving pictures in 
Turkey except on religious pictures. The excit- 
ing films like hunting and war stories, cowboy 
dramas, etc.. are very popular ; they are known as 
"American Films." Educational films as well as 



cartoon and animal pictures are not appreciated, 
while people take a tremendous interest in com 
edies, society drama, detective drama and episodes 
of the late European war. But appreciated above 
all are the Italian films with performers like Maria 
Carmi, Pina Menichelli, and Ida Borelli. Next 
to these come the French and Danish films, while 
English and Russian films are unknown here. 

The only periodical read by film importers is the 
French "Courier Cinematographique." 

(A list of importers of films in Constantinople 
may be obtained from the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce, or its district or co- 
operative offices by referring to file No. 5204.) 

Motion Picture Films in Cairo 

(Charge d' Affaires Frederic de Billiers, Cairo, 
Egypt) 

Cairo has about 10 motion picture theaters, each 
seating on the average 500 persons. Several of 
the larger houses, however, are capable of holding 
an audience of over 1,000 persons. 

Most of the films shown at the present time are 
French and Dalian, but an American film of good 
it appears. There is a distinctly good opening 
quality is given an enthusiastic welcome whenever 
here for the better-class American films D Is te 
be hoped, however, that film exporters will discon- 
tinue furnishing to the Cairo market antiquated 
and machine-worn specimens of American photo 
plays. Films are imported and distributed directly 
among the cinema houses by several dozen firms at 
Cairo, five of which make a specialty of importing 
American films. 

There are no motion picture magazines pub- 
lished in Egypt, and the advertising, very little of 
which is done, is confined to the daily papers and 
signboards. The three most important daily pa- 
pers are the Egyptian Gazette, the Egyptian Mail 
and La Bourse. 

(A list of film importers in Cairo and a list of 
Cairo motion picture theaters can be obtained from 
the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce 
or its district and cooperative offices by referring 
to file No. N'E-14000.) 

United Kingdom 

(Consul General Robert P. Skinner, London, Mav 
14, 1920) 

The motion picture industry, so far as the 
United Kingdom is concerned, looks back on the 
year 1919 as one of great uneasiness, despite the 
fact that the business as a whole enormously in- 
creased in prestige with the public, Parliament and 
press. The producing and manufacturing indus 
try made greater strides, no doubt, than any other 
section of the trade, and great efforts have been 
made to create producing organizations that would 
supply the British market with British films and 
provide serious competition to the American films 
Indeed, as is shown below, the importation of 
films into Great Britain from other than Amer- 
ican sources is negligible, and today, notwithstand 
ing the intensive advertising compaign of British 
film producers, the film theaters still exhibit about 
75 per cent of American manufacture: 



Linear feet —Value 

Imported from 1917 1918 1919 1917 1918 1919 

United States 68,196,165 44,066,425 81,014,079 $.1,440,8,15 $2,321,525 $4,952,66'! 

France 8,639,367 8,408,529 9.813,514 185,355 183,510 338,820 

Other countries 1,818,219 1,197,247 1,945,591 125,310 133,280 187,440 



Total 78,653,751 53,672.201 92,773,184 $3,751,500 $2,638,315 $5,478,920 



The British Film in America — New 
Theaters 

Great activity has been shown by British pro- 
ducers recently, however, and with reasonable suc- 
cess. A number of British films have found their 
way to the United States, and American theaters 
are beginning to open their doors to British films. 
The British manufacturers' most serious trouble at 
present is that British made films command, on 
an average, double the price of American and for- 
eign films. * * * 



Italy 

(Trade Commissioner H. C. MacLean, Rome, 
June 18, 1920) 

The production of motion pictures is an indus 
try for which physical conditions in Italy and the 
Italian temperament are peculiarly favorable, and. 
consequently, this branch of activity early attained 
a high degree of development Italy now claims to 
rank second to the United States among the na 
tions of the world in the manufacture of moti->n 
pictures. An idea of the importance of this in- 



271 



HUGO BALLIN PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

Hugo Ballin, President George S. Hellman, Secy, and Treas. 



First Production 

The Honourable Gentleman 

by Achmed Abdullah 

With a very notable cast, including Rockliffe 
Fellowes, Mabel Ballin, Togo Yamamoto 
and Nellie Fillmore 



The Honourable Gentleman 

by an author whose plays have been purchased by 
Belasco, Leo Ditrichstein, et a/, is the first work of 
Abdullah's presented on the screen. 

The Honourable Gentleman 

originally published in "The Pictorial Review," 
headed the list of great short stories of the year, in 
the review printed in the "New York Evening Post." 

The Honourable Gentleman 

is considered by numerous critics as the greatest work 
of fiction by one of the most widely read of present- 
day authors. 

The Honourable Gentleman 

treats a theme, wherein love and happiness are in- 
volved with blindness — a theme used by Victor 
Hugo; by the Englishman, W. J. Locke; by the 
German, d'Albert; by the great Frenchman, Clemen- 
ceau; in stories, plays and operas. But how differ- 
ently does Abdullah, the Oriental born in Afghanis- 
tan, treat this theme! With what dramatic sense 
and subtle knowledge of the custom and psychology 
of the East, intermingling with the life of New York ! 



HUGO BALLIN PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

366 Fifth Avenue, New York Telephone Fitz Roy 2111 



273 



William Bertram 




Directing 

Vitagraph 
Serials 



EACH ONE 
BETTER 

THAN 
THE LAST 



FINISHED 

"HIDDEN DANGERS" 

MAKING 

"THE PURPLE RIDERS" 

EXCELSIOR!! 



174 



dustry in the economic life of the country can be 
derived from the fact that the working capital 
employed is now estimated at 300,000,000 lire and 
the actual capital invested at 100,000,000 lire. 
There are 82 companies engaged in the produc- 
tion offilms, of which the greater number are lo- 
cated at Rome, which naturally presents unusual 
advantages from the scenic standpoint. The annual 
production of new films in Italy has reached 1,- 
600.000 meters, and if it is estimated that 40 
copies are made from each negative the total of 
printed films is 64,000,000 meters. 

Motion Pictures in Burma 

The closing of other places of amusement and 
the creation of increased interest in the activities 
of the world generally during the war period so 
stimulated the moving picture business in Burma, 
reports Consul Briggs, that there are eight good- 
sized motion picture theaters in Rangoon, five of 
which cater largely to European tastes, while the 
others are patronized chiefly by Burmans and na- 
tives of India. All these theaters are equipped 
with small stages and have seating capacities rang- 
ing from 500 to 1,500, comprised of at least three 
classes, for which the admission charges are 1 
rupee ($0.32), 8 annas ($0.16) and 4 annas, re- 
spectively, while the five theaters catering to Eu- 
ropeans have, in addition, seats at 2 rupees and 
3 rupees. In addition, there are cinemas at Man 
dalay, Moulmein, Maymyo, and other places in 
the interior, generally connected with one of the 
Rangoon cinemas or some importer in India. Two 
dailv performances are given. Films are sometimes 
rented, from $350 to $400 for a good 30 or 40 
part serial film, hut are generally purchased, both 
second-hand and new, from '/i cent to 6 cents per 
foot. The programs of the cinemas generally em- 
brace about 12 numbers, covering a variety of sub- 
jects — current events, war and other serials, travel, 
detective stories, and comic scenes. Serials, in- 
cluding war dramas, cowboy and other outdoor 
pictures, and comic scenes are much in demand 
and usually constitute one-third or one-half of 
the program. More than half of the program is 
frequently devoted to American pictures, and fav- 
oritism is shown the well-known American stars. 

Bulgaria 

Counsul Graham H. Kemper, Sofia, Nov. 21, 
1919. 

There are in Bulgaria about 93 permanent mo- 
tion-picture theaters and about 23 which move 
from place to place, giving exhibitions in various 
towns. As a rule the seating capacity of the per- 
manent theater is from 500 to 1,200, although in 
Sofia there is one theater seating 2,300 persons, 
and another seating 1,800. Admission charges 
have varied from 1 lev to 5 leva, according to the 
location of the seat. (The normal value of the lev 
is $0,193, but at the present rate of exchange it 
is worth about 3 cents in American currency) . 
Owing to a recent Government tax of 50 per cent, 
on admission tickets, the price of admission will 
probably be advanced. 

MEDITERRANEAN REGION 
Isle of Cyprus 

Extracts from reports issued in August by the 
Department of Overseas Trade, London. 

Five kinemas, average capacity 500 to 600. Love 
dramas most popular, detectives dramas next. 
Only old films shown, average price paid about a 
penny a metre. No restrictions on imports ; 8' ,'r 
ad volorem duty at time of importation. 

Alexandria and Cairo 

Four 1st class theaters and two 2nd class the- 
aters in the former, six 1st class and four 2nd 
class in the latter. Many other kinemas scattered 
through country, but they are very primitive. The 
first class theaters accomodate about 800 spec- 
tators and are built on modern lines. Italian 
dramas formerly most popular but they are being 
ousted by American and French subjects. Crude 
dramas and slapstick comedies. Only new films 
imported, owing to prohibitive tariff. Good dramas 
fetch from £120 to £350 (English) Comedies 
only fetch small prices. 



Port Said 

Three kinemas here, and another in course of 
erection. Average accomodation 500. Slapstick 
and detectives mellers most popular. Exchange 
business here handled from Cairo and Alexandria. 

Suez 

Three kinemas. Average accomodation 500. 
Slapstick comedies most popular, spectacular 
dramas, scenic and topicals. Exchange business 
here handled from Cairo and Alexandria. 

Constantinople 

Sixteen kinemas in all, five first class. Average 
accommodation about 800. Modern dramas, well- 
mounted and staged, go down best. Italian films 
first in the market. Import duty 67}£ and 75 
Piatres a kilo: film prices around a franc per 
metre, payable in local currency. 

Smyrna 

Twelve kinemas in Smyrna and suburbs. Mostly 
second hand stuff. Short slapstick comedies and 
sensational dramas preferred. No restrictions on 
imports. Customs duty of 2/- per pound. 

Palva. (Balearic Islands) 

Three kinemas. Business handled from Bar- 
celona. San Feliu, Twenty kinemas seating from 
800 to 1,200. Business handled from Barcelona. 
Other Spanish towns and districts.- Palamos (two 
kinemas) Castillon (seven kinemas) Tomovioja 
(one) Candis (six) Valencia (nine) Denia (two) 
Villagarcia (three) Corunna (four) Cijou (five) 
Bilbas (nine) Santander (three). 

Vigo 

About 20 theaters of which ten are of any im- 
portance. Business handled from Barcelona. At 
Port Mahon and district there are twenty kin- 
emas. At Iviza there are two. 

Barcelona 

Five kinemas seating from 400 to 700 and sev- 
eral smaller kinemas in the outlying district. 
American serials and Italian dramas most popular. 
Import duty 3 pesetas per kilo. 

Boulogne 

Most of the Spanish exchange business is hand- 
led here. It is estimated that there are 1,000 
kinemas in Spain, of which about 10% open daily 
and the others Saturdays and Sundays only. In 
Barcelona itself there are 36 kinemas, the largest 
seating 2,500. This is the largest kinema in Spain. 
The other halls hold from 1,200 to 30. Serials 
and slapstick comedies, detective and adventure 
dramas go best. Italian films very popular. No 
restrictions. Import duty of 3 pesetas on gross 
weight of parcel. 

Lyons and District 

Three halls, accomodating 2,000 1,000 and 730 
respectively. Spectacular dramas and domestic 
comedies preferred. Mostly American films 
shown. 

THE FAR EAST 
Hong Kong 

About 500 kinemas in Japan, average size only 
48 feet by 60 feet. Sensational stuff and slap- 
stick preferred. Import duty of Yen 8.25 per 
kin. Average feature costs about 5 or 6 herce or 
10 cents per foot F. O. B., London or New York. 

Six permanent kinemas with average accomoda- 
tion for 500. No import dues, censorship by 
police. Some very successful pictures have been 
"Kick In," "Hells Hinges," "The Slave Mar- 
ket," "The Auction Block," "The Barrier," "Tar- 
zan" and "When a Man Sees Red." Fairbanks 
and George Walsh comedies also popular. Prices 
for second hand stuff Id to 2Vi per foot. "Tar- 
zan" and "Romance of Tarzan" brought £400 
for the two. 

Tokio 

Large number of kinemas. Slapstick comedies, 
French comedies and spectacular productions go 
best. Mostly second hand stuff from Paris shown. 
Hire prices for a programme of 3,000 metres about 
10 to 120 francs per day, according to size of 
programme. 



275 



SYLVIA BREAMER 

FEATURED IN 

SIDNEY A. FRANKLIN PRODUCTIONS 

EARLY RELEASES 

"THE UNSEEN FORCES" and "PARROT & CO.' 
For First National 



276 



Important Incorporations of Year 



Bonita Theater Co. 
Gay Theater Co. 



Alabama 



California 

Associated First Nat'I Pictures of S. 

Cal 

Banks, Monte Comedies, Inc 

Clark Productions . . .' 

Clermont Photoplays Corp 

Dorety, Kewpie Film Corp., Inc 

Golden Gate Cinema Studios, Corp. . . 

Haworth Studioes, Inc. 

Lafayette Investment Co 

Xappa Theater & Realty Co 

Pacific Coast Theater Corp 

Pacific Motion Picture Studios 

Pasadena Theater Co 

Peters, House, Inc 

Ray Charles Productions, Inc 

Sacred F"ilms, Inc 

Sunkist Film Co 

Sunkist Film Co. Inc 

Canada 

Famous Players Canadian Corp 

Patricia Photoplays, Ltd 

Connecticut 

Hippodrome Amusement Co 

Delaware 

Artists & Authors Attractions 

Adams Amusements, Inc 

All American Film Service, Inc 

Alliance Film Securities Corp 

American Lux Products Corp 

American Theater Corp 

Appollo Motion Picture Producing 
Corp. of Amer 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Pictures of Colo. 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Pictures of 111. . . 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Pictures of Ind. . 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Pictures of Mich. 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Pictures of Mo. . 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Pictures of N. J. 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Pictures of N. Y. 

Associated Is tNat'l. Pictures of Va. 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Pictures of West- 
ern Pa 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Pictures, Inc. . . 

Associated 1st Nat'I. Theaters, Inc. . 

Baltimore Amusement Co 

Bird Film Service 

Brunton, Robert Studio 

Capitol Amusement Co., Inc 

Cinema Sales Corp 

Chilean Cinema Corp 

Clyde Corp 

Colonial American Theaters Corp. . . . 

Colored American Theaters Corp. . . . 

Congressional Film Corp 

Consolidated Film Laboratores Co. . 

Consolidate Realty & Theater Corp. . 

Continental Distributors Co 

Co-Partner Attractions, Inc 

Corono Photo Corp 

Crandall's Lincoln Theater Co 

Crusader Films, Inc 

Delaware Motion Picture Co 

Dover Theater Co 

Dunbar Amusement Co 

Du Pont Film Corp 

Du Pont Pictures, Inc 

East Cuba Production Co 

Educational Films, Ex., Inc., of Pitts. 

Edward C. Ryan Film Corp 

Eminent Authors Pictures, Inc 

Ere-Ka Photo Plays 

Euclid-102 Theater Co 

Exceptional Pictures Corp 

Federal Amusement Co., Inc 

Film Land Players 

Film Lore Congressional Prod., Inc... 

Fountain Theaters Corp 

Gardiner Pictures, Inc 



6.000 
2.000 



140.000 
20,000 

300.000 
400 
500.000 
500,000 
100,000 
50.000 
50.000 
100,000 
150.000 
1.000.000 
100.000 
75,000 
10,000 
10,000 

15,000.000 
1,000.000 



50.000 

700.000 
1,500.000 
200.01/0 



12,500,000 



495,000 
187,500 
255,000 
195,000 
217,500 
870,000 
195.000 

247,500 
6,000,000 
10,400,000 
100.000 
500,000 
5,000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
1,700,000 
2,200.000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
250,000 
1,500,000 
20,000.000 
2,000 
50,000 
500.000 
500,000 
15,500,000 
250,000 
10,000 
25,000 
100.000 
100,000 
600,000 
20,000 
500.000 
1,000,000 
100,000 
500,000 
1,200,000 
100,000 
500,000 
500,000 
10,000 
3.000.000 



General Theaters Corp 

Gloria Film Corp 

Great Western Pictures Corp 

Harris Bros. Amusement Co 

Herbert Picture Enterprises 

Hudson Amusement Co 

Hyperion Pictures Corp 

Hyperion Pictures Corp 

Imperial Films, Inc 

International Exhibitors Circuit 

International Theater Corp 

Incinvible Photoplays 

Itala of America Photoplay Corp. . . . 

Jans Pictures. Inc 

Jefferson Theaters Co 

Jerome's Film Corp 

K — T Film Distributing Corp 

Liberty Amusement Co 

Lynch Enterprises Finance Corp. S. A. 

Master FMlms, Inc 

Master Pictures, Inc 

Mecca Pictures Corp 

Mecca Pictures Corp 

Metropolitan Amusement Co 

Midland Theater & Realty Co 

Modern Photoplays, Inc 

Monarch F'ilm Corp 

Monarch Theater Supply Co 

Monumental Pictures Corp 

Mountain States Theater Corp 

Mureal Productions, Inc 

McKinley Studios, Inc 

National Central Theaters, Inc 

National Film & Service Co 

National Pictures Theaters, Inc 

New Castle Theater Co 

N. Y. Literary Bureau Pictures 

N. Y. Masterpiece Distributors, Inc.. 

Ohio Theaters, Inc 

Orpheum ircuit, Inc 

Pacific Studios Corp 

Peoples' Theaters, Inc 

Philadelphia Investment Amuse, orp.. 

Photoscope of New York 

Quality Pictures Corp 

Reelcraft Pictures Corp 

Regent Theater Co. of Holland 

Renco Film Co 

Robertson-Cole Distributing Corp.... 

Robertson-Cole Studios, Inc , 

Roosevelt Theater Corp 

Royal Pictures, Inc 

Seaboard Film Corp 

Secuta-America aster Films, Inc 

Sedler Amusement Corp 

Shamrock Motion Picture Corp 

Sherman Producing Corp 

Slevin Picture Play Corp 

Southwestern Theater Co 

Square Deal Film Corp 

Standard Amusement Co 

Standard Picture Producing Co 

Stereopticon Products. Inc 

Sterling Feature Pictures, Inc 

Summit Photoplays, Inc 

Theatrical Picture Corp 

Topkis-Ginnis Theater Co 

Town & Country Films, Inc 

Trinity Film Corp. of America 

Tri-State Theaters Corp 

Uniform Film Corp 

Vera McCord Productions. Inc 

Victor Safety Cinema Corp 

Weiland Theaters, Inc 

West Chester Amusement Co 

Widescope Camera & Film Corp 

Witchcraft Photoplays, Inc 

York Theater Co 



Georgia 



Georgia Enterprises, Inc. 

Sally Films, Inc 

Citizens Theater Co 

Cortland Pictures Corp 

Loomia Realty & Amusement Co. 



1,000,000 
500,000 
100,000 
45,000 
100.000 
500,000 
1,000.000 
1,000,000 
500,000 
2,200,000 
400.000 
2,500,000 
1,000.000 
360,000 
45,000 
500,000 
2,000,000 
100,000 
10,000,000 
500,000 
3,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
100,000 
400,000 
2,500.000 
100,000 
60,000 
500,000 
1,000,000 
100.000 
300,000 
1,200,000 
300,000 
15,000,000 
50,000 
600,000 
10,000 
250,000 
110,000,000 
3,120,000 
12,500,000 
100.000 
1,000,000 
2,000,000 
5,000,000 
55,000 
1,000,000 
10.000 
500,000 
100,000 
15,000 
100,000 
500,000 
100,000 
500,000 
4,000,000 
800,000 
275,000 
10,000 
50,000 
500,000 
100,000 
50,000 
750,000 
100,000 
1,000,000 
25,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,600.000 
50,000 
30,200,000 
3,500.000 
5,000 
2,000,000 
750,000 
170.000 

1,000,000 
10,000 
100,000 
500,000 

300.000 



277 




totjetyeg to announce tye formation 
of 

Cl)e Irpant 2?ast)burn lirotmcttons, fnc, 

in association 
2Lre 9. ©cttf 



278 



EUGENE MULLIN 

Directing 

BRYANT WASHBURN 

in 

"THE ROAD TO 
LONDON" 



Bryant Washburn Productions 

INC. 



279 




WILLIAM D. TAYLOR 

Now Making 

WILLIAM D. TAYLOR PRODUCTIONS FOR REALART 

Recent Release: "Huckleberry Finn," by Mark Twain 
Ready for Release : "The Soul of Youth," by Julia Crawford Ives 
" " " "The Furnace," by Pan 

In Preparation: "The Witching Hour," by Gus Thomas 



280 



Illinois 

Palais Royal Theater Corp 200.000 

Indiana 

Arteraft Theaters Corp 200.000 

Citizens Theater Corp 100.000 

Grand Theater Co 15.000 

Herman Theater Co 3,000 

Marion Theater Co 500.000 

Venus Theater Co 15.000 

Iowa 

Midwest Film Corp 50,000 

Kansas 

Popular Players Pictures Corp 200.000 

Kentucky 

Audubon Amusement Co 10.000 

Louisiana 

Asso. 1st Nat'l Pictures of Louisiana 82,500 

Opelouses Amusement Co 60.000 

Maine 

Bangor Opera House, Inc 

Bangor & Spitz Theater, Inc 500.000 

Bangor Theaters. Inc 

Belfast Theater Co 

Black Theaters. Inc 

Capitol Real Estate Co 200.000 

Capitol Theaters, Inc 150.000 



Crockett Theater Co 

Hutchinson Amusement Co 

Lewiston Amusement Co 

Maine & New Hampshire Theaters Co. 

Portland Theaters, Inc 

Prizma, Inc 

Rutland Theaters, Inc 

Strand Theaters, Inc 

Victory Amusement Co 



Maryland 

Druid Theaters Co 500.000 

Hornstein Amusement Co 150,000 

Massachusetts 

Elm Amusement Co 50,000 

Elm Amusement Co 50.000 

New Bedford Strand Theater 10.000 

Michigan 

Rivoli Theater Co 100.000 

Minnesota 

Capitol Amusement Co 50.000 

Duluth Amusement Co 1.000.000 

New Jersey 

Brighton Hotel Co 125,000 

Cellofilm Corp 125.000 

Educare Amusement Corp 

Frank Fay Co 500,000 

K. S. & K. Amusement Co 50,000 

Mercer County Theaters Co 25,000 

New Jersey Theater Co 

Nixon-Forrest Theater Co 2,000 

Peekaboo Productions Co 50,000 

Prospect Amusement Co 25.000 

Roosevelt Theater Corp 300,000 

New York 

Abbott Prod., Inc 60,000 

Adventure Films 100,000 

Aladdin Cinema Co 72,500 

Alexander Film Corp 1 10,000 

Americanization Society 2o!oOH 

American Picture Ass. of Manhattan. 1,000. 000 

American Sensitfilm Co 500.000 

Amsterdam Studios 500 

Anderson Enterprises. G. M 50,000 

Ansonia Pictures Corp lOoiooo 

Apologue Film Corp 20,000 

Arcadia Film Corp 25.000 

Aratone Co lOoiooO 

Aremby Film Corp 10,000 

Aremia Film Co 100^000 

Arial Amusement Co 8.000 

Armstrong Amusement Co oloOO 



Arston Productions Corp 100,000 

Artclass Pictures Corp 5,000 

Arteraft Service, Inc 4,000 

Asher Productions, Inc 5,000 

Ashers' Enterprises, Inc 10,000 

Associated Exhibitors, Inc 100,000 

Astrom Motion Picture o 500,000 

Atlantic Play Exchange 10,000 

Auger Chatburn, Inc.. 20,000 

B. & H. Photoplay Corp 20,000 

B. W. Films Corp 50,000 

Ballin Prod., Hugo 105,000 

Bardavan Theaters Corp 500,000 

Beck Enterprises, Inc 50.000 

Rergman-Hayan Studio, Inc 10,000 

Bowery Theater Corp 500,000 

Broadhoop Pictures Corp 5,000 

Broadway Slide Co 5,000 

Broken Wing Corp 1,000 

Brunswick Film Corp 100,000 

Caesar Theater Corp 100,000 

Capellani Pictures 25.000 

Capitol Film Exchange 25.000 

Capital Motion Picture Co 5.000 

Capital Photo Supply Co 20.000 

Carrier Film Feature Corp 200,000 

Carter Film Corp., A. S 200,000 

Castleton Amusement Co 10,000 

Cayuga Pictures Corp 525,000 

Celebrated Authors Society, Ltd 10.000 

Celtic Players 5.000 

Centro Producing Co 15,000 

Chadwick Pictures, Inc 5.000 

Character Pictures, Inc 150.000 

Cinema Classics, Inc 100.000 

Cinema Corp. of Manhattan 10.0li0 

Cinema Finance Corp 5.000 

Cinemad Prod., Inc 100.000 

Cinema Plays, Inc 50,000 

Cinema Screen Advertising Corp 30,000 

Clements Photo Features, Hal 150,000 

Clock Theater Co 10.000 

Commodore Film Corp 20.000 

Community Prod., Inc 600,000 

Corinthian Amusement Co 10,000 

Cort Amusement Co 50.000 

Countess Florida Film Corp 100.000 

Cine Plant 25.000 

Cinema Newsette, Inc 100.000 

Civic Theater, Inc 100.000 

Climax Film Corp 50.000 

Compson Photoplay Co.. Betty 100.000 

Cosmopolitan Theater Corp 100.000 

Dalton Enterprises Co 60.000 

De Lyons & Co 15,000 

Devereaux & Co., Wm 20.000 

Diamond Amusement Co 50.000 

Distinguished Authors Photoplays, Inc 1,000 

Dominion Film Co 10.000 

Dyla Co 5.000 

D. W. N. Corp 10.000 

Editorial Pictures 50.000 

Educational Film Exchange. Inc 20.000 

Educational Films, N. Y. Exchange.. 100,000 

Empire Enterprises 500,000 

F. A. A. Dahme 

Falk Amusement Co 5,000 

Felix Adler, Inc 10.000 

Film Frolics, M. P. Corp 10,000 

Florence Theater 60,000 

Friedlander, Sampson & Plohm .... 16.000 

G. and S. Amusement Co 50,000 

Gel-Tom Distributing Corp 5.000 

Ilium Amusement Co 18,000 

Jewish Pictures Corp 70.000 

Jimmy Hussey 20,000 

K. & W. Enterprises .100.000 

Lee Advertising Service 20,000 

Maelstrom Amusement Corp 30.000 

Magna Prod 50.000 

McCormick Amusement Co 120.000 

Metropole Theatrical Enter 10.000 

Reliable Enterprises Corp 20,000 

Resolute Amusement Co 5,000 

S. R. S. Theater 20.000 

Salcar Corp 500 

Touraine Film Dist. Corp 20.000 

Venice Art Film Co 10,000 

Washington Theater Prod 500. 0C0 

Wilart Camera Distribution Co 15.000 



281 




282 



E. & S. Amusement Co 12,000 

Eighty-first St. Theater Co 225.000 

Elite Film Association, Inc 50,000 

Klk Film Mending Machine Co 26,000 

Empire State Film Corp 10,000 

F. rie Amusement Co 10,000 

F.rie Operating Co 20,000 

Kssanee Shows 10,000 

Essex Theater Corp 50,000 

Fair Helen Corp .10,000 

Fairchild Aerial Camera Corp 50,000 

Family of Hundred Million 25,000 

Federated Film Exchange of America. 50,000 

Fields Feature Film Corp 50,000 

Film Booking Office 10,000 

Film Bulletin Corp 10,000 

Film Crest Photoplays 100,000 

Film Lore Productions 10,000 

Film Titles Laboratories 2,000 

Filmart Laboratories. Inc .100,000 

Fine Arts Pictures, Inc 500,000 

Fine Film Laboratories 100,000 

Forest and Stream Corp 5,000 

Forward Film Distribution 50,000 

Foundation Film Corp 105,000 

Fox Associates, Inc., Wm 500,000 

Fox Attraction, Inc., Wm 100,000 

Frank Amusement Corp 10,00(1 

Frolic Films, Inc 20.000 

F. &• P. Amusement Co 20,000 

Garrett. Inc., Sidney 50,000 

Gates Operating Corp 10,000 

Gates Theater Corp 250,000 

General Theaters Corp 

Gleirich Productions, Inc 5,000 

Globe Trots Films. Inc 20,000 

Gold Star Producing Co 10,000 

Gotham Motion Pictures Co 5,000 

Great Eagle Film Corp 100,000 

Greater N. Y. Vaudeville Theaters... 2.500.000 

Grossman Pictures, Inc 25,000 

Hargood Holding Company 5.000 

Haring Amusement Co 250.000 

Hepworth Picture Plays 5,000 

Hertel Theater Corp 100,000 

Hillfield Pictures Corp 25,000 

Hipperion Products, Inc 25,000 

Howell Pictures Corp 50,000 

Howells Cine Equipment Co 50.000 

Hurston Pictures, Howaril 5.000 

Illustrated Educational Service Corp.. 150,000 

Interstate Exhibitors Corp 10,000 

Invincible Cinema Corp 15,000 

Irish-American Producing Corp 150,000 

Iroquois Film Corp 5,000 

Ital of America Photo- Plav Corp 10,000 

fackson Film Studio Corp 10,000 

Jacobs, Inc., Arthur H 2,500 

J". G. Pictures, Inc 25,000 

Johnson Photoplay System. Inc.. A... 5,000 

Kane Pictures Corp., Arthur S 5,000 

Kelwin Film Corp 25,000 

Kinaesthetic Arts, Inc 5,000 

King Charles. Inc 50,000 

King Productions, Inc.. Burton 50,000 

Kingsway Theaters, Inc 400,000 

K. & L. Theatrical Enterprises. Inc... 5,000 

K. & M. Amusement Corp 5,000 

Keewanee Productions 2,000 

Ko Ko Komedies. Inc 50.000 

Kosmik Films, Inc 50.000 

Kramesha Amusement Co 8,700 

Krellberg Productions 25,000 

Lally Theaters Corp 80.000 

l.ambsnyde Productions. Inc 5,000 

Lathrop Pictures, Inc 20,000 

Levey Service Corp., Harrv 110.000 

Link Film Co 10.000 

Literary Productions 50,000 

Lithuanian Film Corp 25.000 

L. H. Productions Corp 150,000 

Lodge Photoplays Inc.. Henry 110.000 

L'Star Laborator. Inc .1,000 

Lyons Amusement Co .10,000 

Lyons Enterprises, Inc., Arthur F.... 10,000 

Mantried Amusement Co 10.000 

Mardi Gras Movies 15,000 

Martin Pictures. Inc., Vivian 2,500 

Master Pictures, Inc 500,000 

Melni Amusement Co 5.000 



Masterpiece Film Distributing Corp.. 1,000 

Mayhew Prod., Inc., Stella 50,000 

Mentor Motion Picture Corp 5,000 

MessmoreCo., H. 1 20,000 

Mighty Mfg. Co 50,000 

Mir-American Corp 2.050,000 

M. M. Enterprises 20.000 

Montauk &- Elite Theater Corp 20,000 

Motion Picture Arts, Inc 20,000 

Motion Pictures Prod. Co. of America 500,000 

Motion Picture Renovating Mach. Co. 500 
Motion Picture Theater Owner Films. 

Inc 100,000 

Motion Picture Times, Inc 5,000 

Moving Picture Titles, Inc 15,000 

Murray Hill Photo Play Corp 10,000 

N. Y. Independent Master Films 100,000 

N. Y. Producers Theatrical Assn 120,000 

Normandy Theater Co 125,000 

O'Brien Productions, Inc 300,000 

O. G. & L. Amusement Co 25,000 

Olympic Pictures. Inc 50.000 

Oscar Hammerstein's Grand Opera Co. 20.000 

Outlook Photoplays, Inc 20~000 

Parthenon Amusement Corp 50.000 

Peekskill Palace Corp 125,000 

Perrett Pictures, Inc 5,000 

Photolife, Inc 25.000 

Physical Cutlure Corp 1,000,000 

Pierce Photo Players, Charlotte 200,000 

Pimrice Amusement Co 25,000 

Plymouth Pictures, Inc 10,000 

Peets Photoplay Corp 1.000.000 

Popular Educational Film League.... 1.000 

Portsmouth Film Corp 2,500 

Preferred Pictures 25,000 

Premier Amusement Corp 1,000,000 

Proctors Automatic Projector Co.... 200,000 

Producers Feature Service 10,000 

Projectocatur Film Corp 250,000 

P. W. Pictures. Inc 50,000 

Ramms, Inc 50.000 

Reel Productions Corp • 150,000 

Reeve, Inc., Arthur B 5,000 

Rembrandt Film Sales Co 100,000 

Ritz M. P. Corp 10.000 

Rival Films Co 15,000 

Riverhead Amusement Co 50,000 

Robertson-Cole Dis. Corp. of Del 

Robertson-Cole Realty Corp 1 .000.000 

Reel Productions, Inc 150.000 

Rolfe Productions. Inc., B. A 10]000 

Romograph Manufacturing Co 300,000 

Roubert Productions, Matty 500 

Rush-Lat. Co 5.000 

Salm Ltd Film Corp 150,000 

San Marco Films 500,000 

Savoy Comedies. Inc 10^000 

Screen Snap Shots 10.000 

Selznick Studios 50,000 

Signet Films 10.000 

Sloan Pictures Corp 500 

Smith, Ltd., Guy Crosswell 150,000 

Speer-Lenigan 10,000 

Sphere Pictures 10,000 

S. T. M. Laboratory, Inc 5^000 

Storyart Pictures Corp 75^000 

Summer Film Craft 10,000 

Sylvia Amusement Co 5^000 

1286 Bedford Avenue Corp lb]o00 

Titan Attractions. Inc sioOO 

Tracey Productions. Inc.. Louis 100^000 

Victoria Theater Corp 195,000 

Vincent Dailey & Co 25^000 

Weinberg Theaters Corp KhOOO 

Who's Who in America 

Wonder City Film Co 25,000 

Wynn Production Corp.. Ed 5.000 

North Carolina 

Hamilton Producers Film Arts 10,000 

Hills Rex Theater Co 15.000 

Motion Picture Theaters Corp iob[ooo 

M. P. Theaters Co 100.000 

Ohio 

Bradley Features Co 250.000 

Columbus Feature Pictures Co 25.000 

Community Amusement Co 

Fountain Theater Co 



283 




FREDERICK STANTON 


Leads and Heavies 




LATE RELEASES 




"The Silver Horde" 

"Jenny Be Good" 

"Parlor, Bedroom and Bath" 

"The Spirit of Good" 

"The Fighting Chance" 


by Rex Beach 

Mary Miles Minter 

All-Star Cast 

Madlaine Traverse 

All-Star Cast 


Address 666 South Bonnie Brae, Los 

Telephone, Wilshire 59°o 5924 


Angeles, California 



284 



Lagrange Amusement Co 100,000 

Strand Theater Co 150,000 

Trustee's Picture Co 15,000 

West Toledo Amusement Co 50,000 

Oklahoma 

Petit Theater Corp 75,000 

New State Film Corp 5,000 

Pennsylvania 

Enterprise Amusement Co 100,000 

York Theater Co 20,000 

Tennessee 

Tri-State Film Corp 5,000 

Texas 

Huckhorn Pictures Corp 25,000 

Folks Neighborhood Theaters of Dallas 40,000 

Galveston Playhouse Corp 30,000 

Latin-American Film Corp 75,000 

Rialto Amusement Co 75,000 

Utah 

W. G. Hammett 40,000 

Vermont 

Inter-State Amusement Co 500,000 

Virginia 

Southern Pines Film Corp 900,000 

West Virginia 

Richwood Theater & Amusement Co.. 50,000 

Wisconsin 

Great Northwestern Film Corp 500,000 

Washington 

G. & G. Theater Co 500,000 

Tensen & Von Herberg, Inc 4,000,000 

Shadowland Prod. Co 1,000,000 



OUTLOOK FOR SERIALS 
Public Eager for Serials 

"I am convinced from an observation of the 
situation, both as a producer and a theater owner, 
that the public is more than ever eager for 
serials ; but there is this provision — the patrons of 
the screen, educated by several years' experience 
of high-class feature pictures, have become keenly 
discriminating, with an eye for what is thoroughly 
dramatic, well staged and, in general, praiseworthy 
in the films. 

"The public is no longer the easily pleased, gul- 
lible throng that formerly uncomplainingly ac- 
cepted anything offered it. This is universally 
realized, of course, but cannot be too often stress- 
ed, especially with respect to serials. 

"Notwithstanding the strong call for episode 
pictures — a call that is more insistent than ever — I 
feel certain that the time has come for a breaking 
away from the old standards and the elevation of 
this class of films to a higher level." 

WILLIAM FOX. 
Sees Greater Demand 

"I think that serials next year will be in even 
greater demand than they are at present, if the 
increased business Universal is doing on this 
form of picture can be taken as an index to 
public taste. 

"Our serial bookings have continued to grow 
with gratifying strides this year. Several of the 
big picture theater owners are turning to serials, 
and houses which have heretofore refrained from 
using them now have regular nights on which 
serials are shown. 

"The serial has a well defined place in moving 
picture programs, and with the present tendency 
on the part of producers to serialize the best ob- 
tainable stories, I believe serials will be booked 
more generally even next year than they are at 
present. 

"The old-time serial was filled in the main with 
sensational, hair-raising escapades, stunts and 
thrills. But the serial of today must have more 
than that to make it popular. The new serial — the 
kind Universal is making — while containing the 
proper amount of red-blooded action, must be 
based on stories that have plausibility. 

"Universal recently had two foreign expeditions 
filming scenes for forthcoming serials. We believe 
the Universal is the first company that has un- 



dertaken the filming of serials in far-away coun- 
tries in order to give the public something en- 
tirely different. " 

CARL LAEMMLE. 
Greatest Serial Year Coming 

The coming year will be the greatest serial year 
in the history of motion pictures. I make this 
statement only after a very careful study of con- 
ditions and analysis of the serial situation. 

Just as the continued story is the backbone of 
the magazine business, so is the serial the main- 
stay of a certain class of motion picture theaters, 
and these theaters can no more do without serials 
than the magazine can do without the continued' 
story. 

The theaters referred to are the so-called neigh- 
borhood houses, in other words the houses which 
depend upon regular patronage and not transient 
trade for their existence. To this type of theater 
the serial is indispensable. It builds and holds- 
patronage as nothing else can, and atiyone who- 
is at all familiar with the serial situation knows 
that more and better theaters are using serials at 
the present time than ever before in the history 
of the industry. This I attribute to the fact that 
bigger and better serials are now being made than 
ever before. This is made possible by the fact 
that exhibitors are willing to pay higher rentals- 
for serials than in the past. 

W. E. SHALLENBERGER, Arrow. 

Through With Cheap Stuff 

In my opinion the serial will remain an im- 
portant part of the entertainment furnished by 
the theaters throughout the country. 

I predicted last year that a great many of the 
big theaters who never ran serials would run 
serials and that prediction has come true. There 
is a greater demand for serials than ever before. 
We have passed through the era of cheap melo- 
dramatic serials with inconsistent plots and im- 
possible situations, and most of the producers 
of serials today are spending time, effort and 
money as they have on other big productions. 

There is no room for the type of serial that 
was popular two or three years ago and while I 
don't agree with a great many producers that 
serials should be produced along feature lines, 
yet I do recommend that feature touches be in- 
corporated in serials. 

Serials are intended for that part of the public 
who like to read sensational stories and see 
thrilling pictures. But the advance that has been 
made in the making of feature productions has 
educated them to a point where they expect serials 
to be on a par with them on a production stand- 
point. 

JOE BRANDT. 

Demand for American Films in Czecho- 
slovakia 

Trade Commissioner Vladimir A. Geringer. Prague. 

American motion-picture films are extremely 
popular in the Republic of Czechoslovakia, but 
there has been only a limited supply in the country 
since 1914, when local dealers bought a small r)uan- 
tity from the Ortoni Film Co. in Vienna. Theater 
owners are eager to get some new American films 
but so far have not succeeded, owing to transpor- 
tation difficulties. 

From trustworthy sources I have learned that 
there are in Czechoslovakia about 350 motion- 
picture theaters, of which Bohemia. Moravia and 
Silesia have 295 and Slovakia 55. In Prague, the 
capital city of the Czechoslovak Republic, there 
are 40 theaters, and in Brno (Brunn), the prin- 
cipal city of Moravia, 11. The seating capacity 
ranges from 150 to 1,000. 

Before the war 40 per cent, of the films were 
of American manufacture, 40 per cent. Italian 
and 20 per cent. French. During the war the 
presentation of only German, Austrian. Hungarian, 
and Scandinavian films was permitted. Of these 
5 per cent, was Hungarian, 15 per cent, was 
from the Nordisk Film Co.., and the remainder 
was German and Austrian. Since the signing of 
the armistice, and especially during the last few 
months, a good many French, Italian and Ameri- 
can films have been imported. The American films, 
all old productions with but one or two excep- 
tions, were bought in Paris. 



2S5 



GEORGE A. BERANGER 




"The power of true realism lies in picturing the known in such 
a manner as to obtain and hold interest during the story to be 
told, in bringing strong situations out of the easily-recognizable 
affairs of our everyday lives. Therein lies the prime merit of this 
production. — The main impression made, however, is that en- 
forced by contrast. — There is an unpreached sermon in every 
second of that contrast, a sermon more deeply felt that is not 
pronounced in words, one to make the spectators think twice." — 



Five years with D. W. Griffith 
A MANHATTAN KNIGHT 

(FOX) 



LOUIS TRACY'S BOOK 

"NUMBER SEVENTEEN" 




DIRECTOR 



Louis Reeves Harrison 



(Fox Special Feature Production) 



Etc. 



286 



"You are surprised time and again throughout the run of the 
picture by the novel twists and the clever manner in which they 
have been handled. Director Beranger wastes no footage and 
makes every incident count. As this picture is treated with the 
utmost skill, it should afford real pleasure to all audiences. — The 
most successful direction the star has had." — WID'S. 



GEORGE 




BERANGER 



DIRECTOR 




JOHN M. STAHL 

Director of 
"The Woman in His House" 

MILDRED HARRIS CHAPLIN 

"Sowing the Wind" 

— STARRING- 

ANITA STEWART 

Forthcoming Louis B. Mayer releases through 
First National 



2S3 



Prospects for Serials for the Coming Year 

Counting our serial year as commencing witli 
the Fall opening, it is certain to be the biggest 
serial year Pathe has ever known. 

I believe there is a greater demand that ever 
for serials. We have consistently improved the 
quality of our serial stories and their 'production 
to the point where the product is thoroughly ac- 
ceptable in the best class of theaters today. Com- 
bined with the fact that those serials have just a9 
big an appeal to the popular priced houses as 
has the former type of blood and thunder serials. 
Thus we have created a new market, making the 
demand greater than ever it was before. 

We are now appealing with our serials to the 
identical class of people which reads with avidity 
the stirring serials of adventure, romance and 
mystery in such periodicals as "The Saturday 
Evening Post," "Cosmopolitan" magazine, and 
other popular and widely read weeklies and month- 
lies — the very people who patronize the "Class 
A" theaters all over the country. 

Pathe has not made any change it is booking 
policy, and does not intend to make any change. 
We shall pursue the same broad policy of permit- 
ting the exhibitor to book Pathe product in the 
manner best suited to his needs. If he wants to 
book one serial at a time, we book him that way. 
If he prefers to tie up to us for a six months 
serial program, playing two serials a week, we 
will book him four serials on that basis. If his 
theater cannot properly assimilate two serials a 
week we are content to book him one serial a 
week and place our other con current serial else- 
where in that neighborhood. 

Pathe has ever led the field in serials. We have 
so specialized in this form of entertainment that 
it is a science with Pathe. The past year has 
seen not less than IS independent serials offered 
to the exhibitors on a state-right basis, but few, 
if any, of the producers are making a second at- 
tempt. To-day Pathe stands with over 35 suc- 
cessful episode stories in motion pictures to its 
credit, and the five to be released this coming 
Fall and Winter will bring the total up to 40. 
And we prefer to believe that while we have a 
considerable opposition in the field of serials, we 
have yet to find any serious competition. 

PAUL BRUNET, 

Novelty Now the Essential Feature 

A slight overproduction in the serial field may 
tend to scare away some of the producers, but as 
a matter of fact, the demand for the episode 
drama is as great as, if not greater than ever. It 
all means that unless you have a good serial, don't 
start to book it. Those of quality will come 
through ; others will fall flat, for the public has 
become tired of the 'dyed in the wool thrill' and 
'tight-squeeze finish.' 

Novelty and worth-while story material, are in 
my opinion, the main essentials of the successful 
serials of to-day. Of course, they must have 
enough rapid action but they do not necessarily 
have to end with the hero or heroine facing death 
in some conventional manner. It is with this in- 
formation in mind, that I have screened 'The Great 
Reward.' Instead of concluding as usual, I wind 
up several of the episodes with dramatic action 
which makes the culminations unexpected and 
therefor doubly effective. 

By all means serials should be kept clean. 
Children comprise most of the audiences for this 
type of productions and bad underworld stuff, 
opium dens and similar material should not be 
shown them. I am trying to appeal to their 
imagination in a different way, my newest picture 
including fanciful fairy-like illusions and effects 
which have a greater moral and entertainment 
value. 



Consistent stories, some particular novelty to 
appeal to the youngsters and plenty of fast ac- 
tion — these should be primarily noted by the 
serial producer. As for prospects for the com- 
ing year, I consider them very bright. The 
drawn-out drama has come to stay and unless 
producers make the public tired, it's popularity 
will be retained indefinitely. Incidentally, I should 
advise independent buyers to close for their ter- 
ritories quickly, for there is a likelihood that 
before long there will be a lapse with a supply 
slightly smaller than the demand, due to reasons 
pointed out. 

LOUIS BURSTON. 



Carter Cinema Co. Releases 

How Life Begins — 4 Reels. A microscopic 
biological film, giving with scientific accuracy the 
methods by which new plants and animals come 
into existence. 

Our Children — 2 Reels. Illustrates the weigh- 
ing and measuring, feeding and scientific care of 
children, including play and out-of-door activi- 
ties. 

The House Fly— 1 Reel. The life history of the 
House Fly, illustrating its habits and the manner 
in which it carries germs of various diseases. 

Comrades of Success — 2 Reels. This film drives 
home the basic principles of true living and suc- 
cessful working: SAFETY, COURTESY and 
LOYALTY. 

High Cost of Hurry — 2 Reels. How the many 
ACCIDENTS which occur in the home, on the 
street, on cars, in the shop and other places, and 
how these accidents may be avoided. 

The Human Eye — 1 Reel. A scientific film 
showing the care of the eye, its structure, and 
the disastrous effects resulting from its abuse. 

The Making of an American — 1 Reel. The 
story of an immigrant's rise from digging ditches 
to a position of power through the education ac- 
quired in the free night schools of America. 

Cube and Square Root — 1 Reel. A comprehen- 
siev study of Cube and Square Root, by means of 
animated cartoons. 

Circulation of the Blood — 33 Reels. A mic- 
roscopic study of the circulation of the blood. 

Man's Best Insurance — 1 Reel. Beneficial re- 
sults of exercise. 

Walking to Health — 1 Reel. Walking as the 
best means of increasing the circulation of the 
blood and thus of acquiring and retaining health. 

How to Spend a Healthful and Beneficial Sun- 
day. The fun and benefit of out-door life. 

Milk, Nature's perfect Food. The Evolution of 
the Babcock Milk Test — 1 Reel. Pure milk and 
its production. 

Good Teeth — 1 Reel. Correct methods of car- 
ing for the teeth upon which depend both health 
and happiness. 

Each 1 Reel. 

The Titan of Chasms — Grand Canyon of Ari- 
zonia. 

Through Shoeshone Valley — Greatest Irriga- 
tion Plant in the World. 

Scenes Along the Nation's Highway — Good 
Roads of the United States. 

Scenes Along the Columbia Highway — The Sal- 
mon industry. 

The Ausable Falls in the Adirondacks — Life and 
sports of this scenic region. 

Pikes Peak, The Sentinel of Colorado— scenic. 

With the Hopis and the Navajos in New Mexico- 
Life and Habit9 of the Natives ; Weaving of 
Blankets. 

The Lure of the Maine Coast — Wild animals and 
beauties of this historic Section. 

Quaint Folks and Beautiful Scenes of Cane 
<"od — Historic scenic. 



Complete Short Stuff Reviews in Sunday Issues of 

Wid's Daily 

288a 



Out-Door Exercise in a Woman's Camp in 
Maine — Out door life for women. 

Nature's Wealth of Scenic Beauty and Some 
Cottages at Newport. 

The Heart of the White Mountains — Summer 
resorts, hotels, mountains. 

Educational Series of Wild Animal Life — In 
the United .States 

The Infinite Variety of Little Old New York- 
Many scenes and industries of New York City. 

Down in Old Richmond — Cotton section and 
southern homes. 

American Horses For the War — 

Sponge Fishing and Industry — Study of Aquatic 
plants and an'mals. 

Turtles and Birds — 

Siava and Fiji Islands — Life and Customs of 
the Natives. 
Bermuda — 

Japanese Dances of the Season by Kobe Girls — 
Study of Japanese Dancing. 

Coaching Through Conway in Wales — scenic. 

Practical Workings of the Shell Game — From 
Egg to Chick. 

Pheasant Hunting at the Famous Grove Club — 

In the Canadan Rockies — 



BOOKS AND ARTICLES RE- 
GARDING INDUSTRY 

Compiled by Melitta Diez Peschke, and obtain- 
able by securing desired information from L. H. 
Cannon, Librarian, municipal Reference Library 
of St. Louis, Mo. 

MOTION PICTURES IN GENERAL 

American motion picture directory ; a cyclo- 
pedic directory of the motion picture industry, v. 
I. cl915. Fef. 792. Lists players, theaters, man- 
ufacturers and studios, film exchanges and supply 
and accessory men. 

Bennett, C. N. Guide to kinematography. 
1917. 778. A practical guide for any one inter- 
ested in motion pictures. Contains a summary of 
t'-e laws in regard to kinematography in England. 
Well indexed. 

Cyclopedia of motion-picture work. 1911. Ref. 
778. A book of reference and instruction. 

Dench, E. A. Making the movies. 1915. 792. 
What goes on "behind the scenes" of the movies. 

Harrison, L. R. Screencraft. (cl916.) 778 
A result of a combination of many years experience 
in nearly all departments of motion picture pro- 
duction, and a constant study of the readjustment 
of principles of, older arts to this new relation. 

Hulfish, D. S. Motion-picture work. 1913. 778. 
A book of reference and instruction, covering both 
the manufacture and file exhibition of film pictures. 

Kinematograph year book, diary and directory. 
1914. Ref. 778. A useful book of reference. Con- 
tains a directory of the kinematograph trade and 
the picture theaters in Great Britain. 

Kleine, G. Catalogue of educational moving 
pictures. cl915. Ref. 778. The reels are clas- 
sified and briefly described. Contains also a list of 
"special features" which are not solely educational. 

Lescarboura, A- C. Behind the motion picture 
screen. 1919. 792. Written in a popular style and 
very well illustrated. 

Muensterberg, H. The photoplay; a psycho- 
logical study. 1916. 778 An interesting study, 
s"ggestive to all who would know the reasons for 
the appeal of this "new ra t Prof. Muensterberg 
discusses briefly the technical development of the 
moving pictures ; then the psychological factors 
involved when we watch the screen, depth and 
movement, attention, memory and imagination, 
and the emotions; finally the esthetic side, amon» 
other things the means, demands, and functions 
of the photoplav. — A. L. A. Booklist. 

Rathbun. J. B. Motion picture making and ex- 
hibiting. 1914. 778. Leads the reader through 
the subject systematically starting with elementary 
principles of motion photography and ending with 
the projection of the picture on the screen. 

Richardson, F. H. Motion picture handbook; 
a guide for managers and operators of motion pic- 
ture theaters. (cl912.) 778. 



Risley, J. N. The effect of moving pictures on 
the eyes. (1915.) Ref. Mk. Asserts that mov- 
ing pictures are not injurious to the eyes. 

Schneiderhahn, E. V. P. Motion pictures. (1917.) 
Ref. 792. Lecture delivered in the University ex- 
tension course, St. Louis University. 

Wagner, R.- Film folk; "close-ups" of the men, 
women, and children who make the "movies." 1918. 
792. An intimate peep into the studio lives of 
actors, the cameraman and others who help in 
the filming of a picture. 

Williams, A. Living pictures. (In his Let me 
explain, n. dj 604. Explains very simply the 
principles underlying moving pictures, how they 
are printed and projected. 

PERIODICAL REFERENCES 
Crumly, C. W. Movies — bane or blessing? 

Educa. 40: 199-213. Dec. 1919. 

Eaton, W. P. Latest menace of the movies. N. 

Am. Rev. 212-80. July, 1920. Danger of the 

spoken drama from control of theaters by movie 

magnates. 

Eye-strain from the movie habit. Lit. Dig. 48: 
1310. My. 30, '14. 

Movies and the eyes. Outl. 103: 784. Ap. 
5, *13. 

Have motion pictures changed us? Sci. Am. 
116:56. Jan. 13. 1917. 

Lasky, J. L. What kind of a "menace" are the 
movies? 212:88. July, 1920. Reply to Eaton 
above. 

Movie Trust, The, by Wilham Marion Reedv, 
Reedy's Mirror. May 27, 1920. pp. 424-427. 

Movies and the eyes, Lit. Dig. 51: 208-9. Tl. 
31, '15. 

Visit to movieland ; the film capital of the world, 
Los Angeles. Forum. 63:16-29. Jan. 1920. 

When the movies injure health? Nurse quoted 
in Lit. Digest. 55:27. Sept. 22, 1917. 
HISTORY AND EARLY EXPERIMENTS 

Dyer, F. L., and Martin, T. C. Motion pictures 
(Tn their Edison; his life and inventions. 1910. 
v. 2.) 97b. A chapter devoted to Edison's work 
on motion picture film and camera. 

Grau, R.The theater of science; a volume of 
progress and achievement in the motion picture 
industry. 1914. 792. 

Hcpworth. C. M. Animated photography. 1897. 
778. One of the earliest books on motion pictures. 

Jenkins, C. F. Animated pictures. 1898. 778. In- 
teresting historically as one of the very early books 
on moving pictures. 

Liesegang. F. B. Der gegenwaertige Stand der 
Kinematogranhie. (Tn Jahrbuch fuer Photo- 
graphic u. Reproduktionentechnik. 1913.) An ar- 
ticle on the status of the motion picture art in 
Germany in 1913. 

Marey. E. J. The history of chronophotogra 
phy. (In Smithsonian Institution. Annual re- 
port. 1901. p. 317-340.) Ref. 506. Pt. 1 is the 
history of the science of motion pictures; pt. 2 
explains some of the scientific uses to which it can 
be put. 

Muybridge. E. J. Animal locomotion. 1887. 
Ref. Mb. A series of plates illustrating human 
movements made by one of the first experiments 
with motion pictures. 

Talbot, F. A. A. Moving pictures : how they 
are made and worked. (1914.) 778 The develop- 
ment of the motion picture from the beginning to 
modern times. Conta'ns also interesting chapters 
on trick picture and how they are made. 

PERIODICAL REFERENCES 

Barr, J. M. Animated pictures, Pop. Sci. Mo. 
52: 177. Dec., 1897. 

Dustin, E. T. The first big theater film show 
and some lessons to be learned from it. Moving 
picture world. May 1, 1920, p. 710. 

Grau. R. The early days of the motion-picture. 
Photo-Era. 34: 125. Mar., 1915. 

How the motion-picture machine was invented. 
Sci Am. 112:564. June 5, 1915. 

Van Loan, C. E. Filmland as it was and is. 
Collier's. 56:5-7. Dec. 18. 1015, 

LAWS AND REGULATIONS 

Chief Publishing Co.. N. Y. Approved papers 
for the week ending July 12, 1913; ordinances 



28Rh 



governing motion picture shows. (1913.) Munic- 
ipal Branch Kef. 792. 

National Board of Censorship of Motion Pic- 
tures. Suggestions for a model ordinance for 
regulating motion picture theaters, n. d. Ref. 792. 
The suggestions made are practical and would 
be application to any city. 

New York (City) Ordinances, etc. An ordin- 
ance relative to motion-picture theaters : adopted 
by the Board of Aldermen July 1, 1913; approved 
by the Mayor July 8, 1913, effective Aug. 7, 
1913. (1913.) Ref. 792. 

St. Louis. Council. Council bill No. 255 ; (w. 
a rept. by the Municipal Reference Librarian on 
censorship of motion picture film w. data fr. ten 
cities. 1913.) 

PLAYS 

Anderson, A. G. Modern methods in photo- 
play writing. 1917. 808.2. It is to the ambitious 
beginners and to the seekers after truth among 
professional writers anxious to try their art on 
the silent drama, that this book of instruction is 
addressed. — Preparatory Note. 

Ball, E. H. Art of the photoplay. 1913. 808.2. 
Aims to show the various stages of the scenario, its 
essentials, how it is received and produced. 
— Photoplay scenarios : how to write and sell them. 
1915. 808.2. By a former scenario editor; Con- 
tains a sample comedy scenario and a simple drama 
scenario. 

Barker, E. F. Art of photoplay writing. 
(cl917.) 808.2 Meant for all who desire to learn, 
in a thorough manner, the writing of photoplays. 

Bertsch, M. How to write for moving pictures; 
a mannual of instruction and information. (cl917.) 
808.2. Gives directions for writing the photoplay, 
explaining the technical terms, suggesting the kind 
of theme to use and the kind to avoid. The 
last chapters take up the question of censorship, 
morality and mental suggestion. 

Caine, C. J. How to write photoplays, (c 7915.) 
808.2. A reproduction of a series of articles on 
the subject as they appeared in the "Hints for 
scenario writers" Department ef Picture-Play 
Weekly and Picture-Play Magazine. 

("arr, C. The art of photoplay writing (c.1914.) 
808.2. Suggestoisns for photoplay writers. In- 
cludes, also articles by scenario editors and writers. 

Cogan, J. P. Scenarios; how to write them. 
cl919. 808.2 Intended to show in a clear, simple 
way how a photoplay is constructed, marketed and 
sold. 

Deans, J. Playwriting for motion pictures. 
(cl911.) 808. 2 A few essential directions for 
motion picture writing. 

Dench, E. A. Playwriting for the cinema. 1914. 
808.2. 

Dimick. H. T. Photoplaying making. 1915. 
808.2. Shows by illustration, that a scenario 
which merely portrays life is not necessarly dra- 
matic, and that dramatic principles in a photoplay 
are essentail to sustain interest. 

Esenwein, J. B. and Leeds. A Writing the 
photoplay (cl913.) 808.2. Aims to teach the 
theory and practice of photoplay construction, by 
pointing out its component parts and hten show- 
ing how these parts are constructed and assembled 
so as to form a strong, well-built, attractive and 
salable manuscript. 

Fantus, F. How to write a moving picture 
play. cl913. 808.2. Written in the earnest de- 
sire to asssist the inexperienced writer to market 
his ideas, to bring new talent to light and to aid 
in the advancement of that wonderfully interest- 
ingand instructive pastime. The Moving Picture 
Play. — Author. 

George, P. The construction of a motion pic- 
ture play, c 1 9 1 1 . 808.2 Aims to give knowledge 
in a concise form to the many who have clever 
ideas, but are ignorant of the requirements of a 
successful picture play. 

Gordon, W. L. How to write moving picture 
plays. 1915. 808.2 Aims to give the correct 
technical form for the photoplay. 

Hill, W. A. Ten million photoplay plots 
(C1919.) 808.2. Gives the basic dramatic situa^ 
V>? nS which ten million plots may be formed. 

Photopjay censorship regulations are also given. 
T.iddy, L. W. Photoplay instructions. cl913! 



S08.2. A handy reference book from which all un- 
necessary details have been eliminated. 

Nelson, J. A. The photo-play. 1913. 808.2. A 
practical treatsie on the form, structure and tech- 
nique of the photoplay. Suggestions how to sell 
to the best advantage. 

Parsons, L. O. How to write for the "movies." 
1916. 808.2. By a scenario editor in reply to 
thousands of letters from ambitious photoplay- 
wrights, asking for help in writing a scenario. 

Peacocke, L. T. Hints on photoplay writing. 
(1916.) 808.2. 

Phillips, H. A. Photodrama. (1914.) 808.2. A 
practical treatise on the art of photoplay writing. 

Powell, A. V. The photoplay synopsis (cl919.) 
808.2 Developes complete plhotoplay synopsis 
from the germ to the final building together of 
the whole plot and synopsis. 

Radnor, L. The photoplay writer. (cl913.) 
808.2. A brief manual of information, instruction 
and advice on photoplay writing and submission 
to producing companies. 

Russel, L. C. The photo-playwright's primer. 
(cl915.) 808.2 Very slangy rather humorous les- 
sons in photopjay writing. 

Sargent, E. W. The technique of the photo- 
play. (cl916. ) 808.2. A very thorough text-book, 
and one, as the author himself says, that must be 
studied, not merely read. 

Selvin, J. On picture-play writing. (cl912.) 
808.2. In a plain and practical way calls atten- 
tion to some problems and possibilities. 

Snyder, L. R. Photodrama (cl913.) 808.2. 
Gives thgeroundwork of picture-play writing. 

Thomas, A. W. How to write a photoplay. 
(cl914.) 808.2. A text-book that the amateur 
writer can easily understand. Includes "A talk 
with the reader," and a chapter of questions and 
answers. 

Welsh, R. E. A B C of motion pictures. (1916.) 
778. In a logical manner every stage in the pro- 
cess of making motion pictures is covered, includ- 
ing its history, its business phase and photoplay 
writing. 

Wright, W. L. The motion picture story. 
(cl914.) 808.2. Analyzes different phases touch- 
ing upon general requirements and defining the 
idea, plot, climax, action, etc. 

Zuver, E. How to write photoplays (cl915.) 
808 2 

MORALS AND CENSORSHIP 
Chandler, E. H. How much children attend 
the theater, the quality of the entertainment they 
choose and its effect upon them. (In Child Con- 
ference for Research and Welfare. Proceedings. 
1910.) Ref. 362.7. A paper prepared for the Con- 
ference held at Clark University, Worcester, in 
July, 1909. 

Cinema Commission of Inquiry. The cinema; 
its present position and future possoibilities. 1917. 
175. A summary of the result of investigations of 
the Commission into the effects, mora]ly, mentally 
and physically of picture shows on their patrons, 
with especial reference to children and adolescents. 

Jump, H. A. The social influence of the moving 
picture. 1911. 175. The good influence of the 
motion picture can be felt, (1), on the general in- 
telligence of the people; (2), on their homes; (3) 
on their morals. 

National Board of Censorship of Motion Pic- 
tures. The policy and standards. 1914. Ref. 792. 
Explains on what basis moving pictures are judged 
and the difficulties encountered in censoring films. 

The question of motion picture censorship. 1914. 
Ref. 792 States the position of the Board on legal 
censorship of motion pictures and gives a brief 
history of its organization and procedure. 

Report. 1911,1913. Ref. 791. 

National Board of Review of Motion Pictures. 
Standards and policy. Reissue. 1916. Municipal 
Branch. This Board was formerly the National 
Board of Censorship. 

Pennsylvania. State Board of Censors. Mo- 
tion picture; list of films, reels and views ex- 
amined. 1918. Ref. 792. Arranged alphabetically 
by title. Gives names of manufacturers, for whom 
reviewed, number of reels and date 

Report, Dec. 1915-Dec. 1917. Ref. 792. States 
briefly the nature of the pictures viewed and some 
of the reasons for refusing certain ones. 



289 



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Phelan, (John) J. Motion pictures as a phase 
of commercialized amusement in Toledo, Ohio. 
(Social Survey series, 3, August, 1919) Toledo 
(cl919.) A protest against uncensored moving 
pictures. While its original research covers only 
the City of Toledo, the result of its findings has 
universal application. There is a classified list of 
acceptable moving pictures, (pp. 76 100), how ob- 
tainable and cost per reel. There is a bibliography 
on motion pictures as a commercialized amuse- 
ment, consisting largely of articles in periodicals 
( 1908-18) — L. H. C. 

PERIODICAL REFERENCES^ 

Behrman, S. N. Movie morals. New Repub. 
12:100-1. Aug. 25, 1917. 

Child, the movies and the censor. Sunset. 37:31. 
July, 1916. 

Have movies ideals? Forum. May, 1918. 
Menace of the movies. Am. Mag. Sept., 1913. 
Morals and movies. Harper's wk. Dec. 19, 
1914. 

Morals of the movies. Survey. 35 ;662. Mar. 
4, 1916. 

"Movie" manners and morals. Outlook. 113: 
644-5. July 26, 1916. 

Oberholtzer, E. P. Moving picture : obiter dicta 
<>f a censor. Yale R. n. s. 9 : 620-32. Apr. 1920. 
— Seeing the "movie" every day. Unpartizan R. 
13:338. Mar. 1920. 

Plague of pictures. Living age. Ap. 25, 1914. 

Program for dealing with the movies by J. 
Lee. 

Stelzle, C. Movies instead of saloons. Ind. 85 : 
311. Feb. 28, 1916. 

Unamerican innovation. Ind., 86:265. May 22, 
1916. 

ACTING 

Agnew, F., psued. Motion picture acting. 
(cl913.) 792. A book of facts regarding the op- 
portunities of this work, the qualifications, essen- 
tial talents, and methods of procedure for success 
as a photoplayer.- — Pref. 

Bernique, J., pseud. Motion picture acting for 
professionals and amateurs. 1916. 792. Chiefly 
devoted to the art of facial expression when posing 
for the camera. Copiously illustrated by pictures 
of well known movie stars. 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Collins, F. A. The camera man ; his adventures 
in many fields. 1916. 770 Tells of the trials and 
tribulations of the camera man, in taking pictures, 
not only for the movies, but also for newspapers 
and other enterprises. 

Croy, H. How motion pictures are made. 
(1918.) 778. Here are revealed to us all the sec- 
rets behind the trick pictures, animated cartoons, 
pictures of the bottom of the ocean, and other 
things that have made us gasp with wonder every 
time we have attended a movie. Includes an in- 
teresting history of motion pictures and is well 
illustrated. 

Doubleday, R. Moving pictures; some strange 
subjects and how they were taken. (In his Stories 
of inventors. 1904.) 609. Explains in a popular 
way what the moving picture machine is and tel]s 
of some of the dangers encountered by moving pic- 
ture camera men. 

Hulfish, D. S. The motion picture; its making 
and its theater. 1909. 778. The book, which is 
in the form of questions and answers, is divided 
into two parts, the first being devoted to the 
actual making of the film, the second to the opera- 
tion of the machine in theaters. 

Johnson, G. L. Kinematography by means of 
coloured lights. (In his Photography in colours. 
1916.) 778. Explains briefly the different methods 
by which colored motion pictures are produced. 

Jones, B. E., ed. How to make and operate 
moving pictures. 1916. 778. Gives detailed in- 
structions on the camera, printing and finishing 
films, and projecting them on the screen. 

I.omas, H. M. Picture play photography. 1914. 
Ref. 778. The underlying principles of motion pic- 
ture photography, with practical hints and sug- 
gestions. 

I.utz, E. G. Animated cartoons. 1920. 778. Ex- 
plains the mystery of the fascinating little animated 
figures always featured at the movies. It reviews 



also the development of motion [pictures from the 
toy stage. 

Malius, G. H. How I filmed the war. 1920. 
940.91. The extraordinary experiences of the man 
who filmed the battle of the Somme. 

Talbot, F. A. A. Practical cinematography and 
its applications. 1913. 778 A book for the mo- 
tion picture photographer. The methods used for 
developing and printing are described. 

PERIODICAL REFERENCES 

Animated cartoons in the making. Sci. Araer. 
115: 354. Oct. 14, 1916. 

Artificial daylight of photoplay land. Sci. Am. 
112 :221. Feb. 28, 1920. 

Coustet, E. Motion pictures in colors. Sci. Am. 
Supp. 2033 :386. Dec. 19, 1914. 

Filming marine life ; how Curator Ditmars 
makes motion picture studies of aquaria for the 
screen. Sci. Am. 119:10. July 6, 1918. 

How camera men gamble with death in filming 
the thrillers. N. Y. Tribune quoted in Cur. 
Opinion. 64: 187-8. Mar., 1918. 

Motion picture studio with changes with the 
weather. Sci. Amer. 117:352. Nov. 10, 1917. 

Recording sound on motion picture film. Sci. 
Am. 117:473. Dec. 22, 1917. 

Secrets of the motion picture camebuers are re- 
vealed. Sat. Eve. Post quoted in Cur. Opinion. 
64:330-1. May. 1918. 

"Shooting the generals with the movie camera." 
N. Y. Tribune quoted in Lit. Digest. 55: 78-81. 
Dec. 8, 1917. 

Ultra-rapid cinematograph. Sci. Am. Monthly. 
1 :27. Mar. 1920. 

Wonders of camouflage that are accomplished 
in movieland. Sun quoted in Cur. Opinion. 64:31. 
Jan., 1918. 

OPERATION OF PICTURE MACHINES 

Cameron, J. R. Instruction of disabled men in 
motion picture projection ; an elementary text 
book. 1919. 778 Published in connection with 
a course given by the Red Cross Institute for Crip- 
pled and Disabled Men. 

Hite, M. H. Lessons in how to become a suc- 
cessful moving picture machine operator. cl90S. 
778 The author, who is a cinematograph operator, 
tells which are best machines to use and explains, 
in a popular way, how to use them. 

Horstmann, H. C, and Tousley, V. H. Motion 
picture operation. (cl914.) 778 Aims to pre- 
sent in a simple and practical way the essential 
principles of motion picture work. A working 
knowledge of electricity in general is assumed. 

Joy, H. W. Book of instruction for operation 
of kinemacolor appliances. cl910. Ref. 778. The 
kinemacolor projects colored pictures. The au- 
thor, in this little book, assumes that the operator 
has had experience in displaying black and white 
motion pictures. 

THEATERS 

Kinsila. E. B. Motion picture theaters. (In 
his Modern theater construction. cl917.) Ref. 
725. Presents plans for motion picture theaters, 
taking into consideration lighting, ventilation, ma- 
terials for screens, etc. 

Meloy, A. S. Theaters and motion picture 
houses. 1916. Ref. 725. Contains a list of houses 
furnishing materials, supplies and equipment for 
theaters. 

Travelers Insurance Co.. Hartford, Conn. Safe- 
ty in moving picture theaters. cl914. 725. Tells 
exactly how picture theaters shou]d be .built in or- 
der to make them perfectly fire proof. 

PK1UODICAL REFERENCES 

Automatic control system that precludes fire 
and panic in picture theaters. Sci. Am. 115:104. 
Jul y29. 1916. 

Winship, J. T, Safety from fire in motion pic- 
tun- theaters. Am. Citv. 15:700-1. Dec, 1916. 
MUSIC 

Ahern, E. A. What and how to plav for pic- 
tures. (cl913.) 786.4. 

Lang, E., and West, G. Musical accompani- 
ment of moving pictures; a practical manual for 

pianists and organists. u-1920.) 

True. L. C. How and what to play for moving 
pictures: a manual and guide for pianists. (cl914) 
786.4, List of music to be played with certain 
types of pictures. 



291 



PAUL H. SLOAN E 

Original Feature Stories and Continuities for 
WILLIAM FOX 




1 9 2 0 (first half) 
THE TIGER'S CUB (continuity) featuring PEARL WHITE 



THE SCUTTLERS 
THE DEADLINE 



(continuity) 
(story and 
continuity) 
A MANHATTAN KNIGHT 

(adaptation ) 



THE THIEF 

( from the play 1 >y 
H enri Bernstein ) 



( adaptation & 
continuity in 
collaboration 

with 
Max Marcin) 



William farnum 
george walsh 
george walsh 

pearl white 



and the William Fox Super Special 

Over The Hill To The Poorhouse 

(with an all-star cast) 

STORY AND CONTINUITY 



292 



PERIODICAL REFERENCES 
\lu<ic and the movies as allies. Musical America 

quoted in Lit. Digest. 55:26-7. Aug. 11, 1917. 
Stearns, T. Music for the movies. Musician. 

21 :203. Apr., 1916. 

ART 

Bakshy, A. The [cinematograph as art. (In his) 
Path of the modern Russian stage. (cl916.) 792 
A plea for the kinematograph as a vehicle of real 
art expression. 

Kreeburg, V. O. The art of photoplay making. 

1915. 792. Considering the moving picture as 
new form of art. The author tells in a most inter 
esting way how pictures may be made really artis- 
tic, both to the eve and to the mind. 

Hannon, W. M. The photodrama : its place 
among the "fine arts. (cl915.) 792. For those 
who are desirous of getting a birds-eye view of 
this most ubiquitous, most popular, and newest of 
the arts. — Pref. 

Lindsay, N. V. Art of the moving picture. 

1916. Here we have the moving picture consid- 
ered as a fine art. The author divides the pic- 
tures into three classes, photo-plays of action, in- 
timacy and splendor ; or, in terms of art, sculp- 
ture-in-motion, painting-in-motion and architecture- 
in-motion. 

PERIODICAL REFERENCES 
Movies destroy art. Harper's Wk. Ap. 29, 
1916. 

ADVERTISING AND SALESMANSHIP 

Dench, E. A. Advertising by motion pictures. 
(cl916.) 659. Points out the advantages of ad- 
vertising by motion pictures in all phases of busi- 
ness, and gives practical advice as to how and 
where to have the films shown effectively. 

PERIODICAL REFERENCES 

Maxey, T. T. Film and the American railroad. 

Ry. Age. 63:379. Aug. 31, 1917. 

Torr, J. M. Selling machinery by motion pic- 
tures. Eng. Mag. 50:509. Jan., 1916. 

Vision in advertising. Sci. Am. 119:456. Dec. 
7. 1918. 

EDUCATION 

Clement, I. Teaching citizenship via the movies. 
1918. 778. An argument for the use of moving 
pictures to Americanize the foreigner, and to in- 
crease civic interest and intelligence. Contains a 
valuable subject list of civic motion pictures, giv- 
ing the source from which they can be obtained, 
and the cost of rental. 

Dench, E. A. Motion picture education. (cl917.) 
792. Shows in an interesting way how both the 
child and the adult may be educated by motion 
pictures. 

McConoughey, E. M. Motion pictures in relig- 
ious and educational work. (1915.) 792. How 
motion pictures are being used to advantage by 
the church, in mission work. Part 2 contains prac- 
tical suggestions. 

National Board of Censorship of Motion Pic- 
tures. Motion pictures in public education. (1912.) 
Ref. 778. Deals with the possible use of motion 
pictures by religious and educational agencies, with 
a view to public welfare. 

Saunders, A. H. Motion pictures as aid to edu- 
cation. (In U. S. Bureau of Education. Report. 
1913. v. 1. Ref. 379.7. Shows the wide field of 
educational cinematography. Contains a list of 
subjects upon which films may be obtained. 

Sellmann, A. W. Der Kinematograph als Volks- 
erzieher? 1912. 778. Treats of the popularity 
of tin moving picture, the various films shown and 
suggestions for improvement in the latter. 

PERIODICAL REFERENCES 

Class consciousness and the movies. Atlantic. 
Jan., 1915. 

Dench, E. A. Industrial application of motion 
pictures. Machinery 23:133. Oct., 1916. 

Gcyer, O. R. Motion pictures in the schools ; 
how the Iowa children are to benefit from the 
cinema. Sci. Am. 115:193. Aug. 26, 1916. 

Henry, H. New role for the moving picture. 
Musician. 20:761. Dec, 1915. 

How the movies show things you can't see for 
yourself. Ind. 101:152. Jan. 24, 1920. 

Safety first in movie lessons. Railway Mainte- 
nance Engineer quoted in Lit. Digest. 54:1329 
May 5, 1917. 



BIOGRAPHY 

Motion picture studio directory. 1919-20. Ref. 
792. Very brief biographies of motion picture act- 
ors and actresses, classified according to the parts 
they play and arranged alphabetically under these 
classes . Indexed. 

Photoplay Magazine. Stars of the photoplay. 
cl916 Ref. 927.9. More than one hundred pho- 
tographic reproductions of photoplay stars and 
directors with brief biographical sketches. 

Lists of novels that have been filmed may be 
found in the Library Journal beginning with v. 
43, 1918, and in Publishers' Weekly beginning with 
v. 94. 1918. 



N. A. M. P. I. 

Various important committees handled unusual 
difficult problems during the year. Among these 
were the handling of the situation when in De- 
cember, 1919. it looked as though the theaters 
might be closed by virtue of the coal strike. A 
special committee headed by John C. Flinn con- 
ducted an educational campaign last January, 
which prevented the closing down of theaters when 
there was the recurrence of the infiuenza epidemic. 

In April, through the action of another com- 
mittee when the outlaw railroad strike developed, 
the post office department issued an order, per- 
mitting motion picture film in parcel post ship- 
ments. This prevented in all probability the na- 
tion wide closing down of picture houses. 

On April 1 the association moved to the New 
York Theater Bldg.. 1520 Broadway. 

On February 17, many members of the associ- 
ation attended the luncheon given to W. F. 
Faulkner of the London Evening News, in this 
country studying film conditions for Lord North- 
cliff. 

One of the most important activities of the 
association was that in connection with the 
Americanization campaign planned by Franklin 
K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior. 

A committee which has had unusually interest- 
ing work during the year was the film theft com- 
mittee. The report of this committee work is 
interesting. From August 1919 to January 1920, 
17 arrests were made which resulted in 16 indict- 
ments. One of the men arrested jumped $5,000 
bail. Of the remainder 8 had sentences suspended. 
The owner of ttye theater in Madison, N. J. — 
Barnet Alvin, was sent to the penitentiary on a 
sentence of 1 to 3 years, as was Al Lehrer, head 
shipping clerk of a Select exchange. Up to Aug. 
15, 1920, the other cases had not been tried. Two 
arrests were made in February for robbery of 
film parcel post. The committee has by its 
diligence checked theft's of film in and around 
New York and has forced out of business several 
disreputable dealers in second hand films. 

The Washington Bureau of the Association in 
charge of Jack S. Connelly has proven very sat- 
isfactory. An office has been established in Bal- 
timore for the handling of films before the Mary- 
land Censorship Board. 

The Bureau during the year brought several 
important measures before Congress : A bill to 
prohibit the selling of tickets in picture houses, 
unless there was a vacant seat ; a bill to prohibit 
the showing of wild west pictures, which might 
incite crime and another which sought that the 
houses in Washington should be closed on Sun- 
day. A number of matters pertaining to the 
trade were taken up by the bureau before the 
Federal trade commission, the post office depart- 
ment and the internal revenue department. The 
National Film theft bill in the hands of a con- 
gressional committee at the time of going to 
press, is expected to be acted upon some time 
in December. 

The following tabulated statement shows the 
association's membership. 

Producer, Class A 19 

Producer, Class B 3 

Producer, Class C 19 

Exhibitor, Class 2 3 

Supply and Equipment, Class 3 15 

distributor, Class 4 15 

Independent exchanges 3 

cneral Division. Class 5 75 



2<M 



CHARLES OSBORN SEESSEL 

Art Director 



For 

FAMOUS PLAYERS- 
LASKY CORP. 

"The Right to Love" 

" On with the Dance" 

"Dr. Jekyl & 
Mr. Hyde" 

"The Copperhead" 
"TheAmateurWife" 

"The Counterfeit" 

"The Society Exile" 

"Wanted 
A Husband" 

"The Misleading 
Widow" 

"His House 
in Order" 

"Lady Rose's 
Daughter" 

"The Cost" 




For 

D. W. GRIFFITH 

"Romance" 
"Way Down East" 

For 

ROLAND WEST 

"Out of the 
Darkness" 

For 

THOMAS INCH 
"The L' Apache" 
"The Dark Mirror" 

For 
REAL ART 

"The Fear Market" 
"Erstwhile Susan" 

"Anne of 
Green Gables" 

"The Sinners" 

"The Stolen Kiss" 

For 

LEONHARDT- 

CALLAGHAN 

PRODUCTIONS 

George Arliss 
"The Devil" 



Complete Art Department Service For Special Productions: 

Comprising the designing of all sets, supplying blue prints and working 
drawings, superintending of construction and color, the selection of all 
properties and dressing of sets. 

Estimates Furnished For This Service 

Business Management EDWARD SMALL 



294 



Important First Run Houses 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Alcazar 

Strand 

Rialto 

Trianon 

Loew's 
Mobile 

Empire 

Crown 
Montgomery 

Empire 

Strand 

Colonial 

Grand 

ARIZONA 

Globe 

Morton 

Dime 
Phoenix 

Strand 

Columbus 
Yuma 

Casino 

Yuma 

ARKANSAS 
Ft. Smith 

Victory 
Helena 

Jewel 

Palace 

Crystal 
Hot Springs 

Royal 

Princess 

New Central 
Little Rock 

Palace 
Pine Bluff 

Best 
Russellville 

Community 

CALIFORNIA 
Alameda 

Strand 
Bakersfield 

Hop Jorden 

Groggs 

Bakersfield 
Berkeley 

T. & D. 

Un. of Cal. 
Coalingo 

Liberty 
El Centro 

Palace 
Eureka 

Rialto 
Fresno 

Kinema 

Liberty 
Hanford 

T. & D. 
Long Beach 

Liberty 

Laughlin 

Palace 



Los Angeles 

Grauman's 
Chine's Broadway 
Auditorium 
Superba 

Tally's Broadway, 

Alhambra 

California 

Kinema 

Rialto 
Monterey 

Strand 
Oakland 

Kinema 

American 

Ye Liberty 

T. & D. 
Pasadena 

Florence 

Strand 

Jensen's 

New Raymond 

Pasadena 
Pomona 

Belvedere 
Sacramento 

T. & D. 

Godard's J. St. 
Santa Anna 

West End 

Temple 
Santa Barbara 

California 

Mission 
San Bernardino 

Strand 

Opera House 
Temple 
San Diego 

Plaza 

Superba 

Cabrillo 

Pickwick 

Broadway 
San Francisco 

Strand 

California 

Imperial 

Tivoli 

Portola 

Pantages 

Hippodrome 

Rialto 

Sun 

Frolic 
San Jose 

T. & D. 

T and D 

Hippodrome 

Liberty 

Wisconsin 
San Pedro 

Victoria 
Stockton 

T. & D. 



Taft 

Hippodrome 
Vallejo 

Virginia 

COLORADO 
Colorado Springs 

Burns 

America 

Princess 

Liberty 

Odeon 
Denver 

Strand 

American 

Princess 

Rialto 

Fox Rivoli 

Fox Isis 

Tabor Grand 
Durango 

Gem 
Ft. Collins 

Empress 

Lyric 
Leadville 

Liberty Bell 
Pueblo 

Grand 

Princess 

Rialto 
Sterling 

American 

Lyric 

CONNECTICUT 
D anbury 

Empress 

Taylor 

Opera House 
Derby 

Starling 
Hartford 

Strand 

Palace 

Majestic 

Princess 

Rialto 

Parson's 

Grand 

New Poli House 
Meriden 

Poli's 
Middletown 

Grand 

Middlesex 
New Britain 

Palace 

Lyceum 
New Haven 

Rialto 

Palace 

( )h mpia 

Strand 
New London 

Crown 
Norwalk 

Regent 



295 



McCarthy Productions 




Offering a group of All-Star Creations in varied fields 
founded on a high standard of quality, each with the 
exquisite detail of story, cast, direction and photo- 
graphy as embodied in 

"OUT OF THE DUST" 

During the season of Ninteen-Twenty-Twenty-one he 
will produce four photo-plays of exceptional merit and 
distinction preserving the highest ideals of the craft. 



General Offices Suite 500, Markhan Building 

Hollywood, California 



296 



Putnam 

Bradley- 
Stamford 

Colonial 

Alhambra 

Strand 
Waterbury 

Strand 

Princess 

Rialto 

DELAWARE 
Wilmington 

Majestic 
DISTRICT OF COLUM- 
BIA 
Washington 

Crandall's Metropolitan 

Loew's Columbia 

Loew's Palace 

Moore*s Rialto 

Moore's Garden 
FLORIDA 
Jacksonville 

Imperial 

Arcade 

Casino 
Miami 

Paramount 

Unique 
Pensacola 

Isis 

St. Augustine 

Jefferson 
St. Petersburg 

( irand 

La Plaza 
Tampa 

Strand 

Grand 

Alcazar 

GEORGIA 

Albany 

Princess 
Atlanta 

Metropolitan 

Criterion 

Rialto 

Strand 

Howard 

Tudor 

Loew's Grand 

Alamo 
Augusta 

Rialto 

( irande 

Modjeska 
Macon 

Capitol 

Princess 
Savannah 

( )deon 

Arcade 

IDAHO 

Boise 

Majestic 

Pinney 
Idaho Falls 

American 
Colonial 



Lewiston 

Paramount 

New Theatorium 
Moscow 

Liberty 
Nampa 
Majestic 
Wallace 

Grand 

Liberty 

ILLINOIS 

Alton 

Hippodrome 

Princess 
Aurora 

Fox 
Rialto 
Strand 
Bloomington 

Majestic 
Chicago 

Ambassador 

Pantheon 

Woodlawn 

Central Park 

Alcazar 

Ziegfeld 

Band Box 

Tivoli 

Randolph 

Barbee's Loop 

Playhouse 

Castle 

Casino 

Boston 

Riviera 

State-Lake 

Orpheum 

Pershing 

Lake Side 

Rose . 

Covent Garden 
Decatur 

Lincoln Square 

Avon 

Bijou 
East St. Louis 

Erber's. 

Erco 
Elgin 

Rialto 
Galesburg 

Orpheum 

West 

Colonial 
Joliet 

Princess 
Moline 

Mirror 

Bio 
Paris 

Majestic 

Shean's Opera House 
Peoria 

Apollo 
Majestic 
Princess 
Palace 



Quincy 

Erbers 

Princess 

Orpheum 

Belasco 
Rockford 

Midway 

Palm 

Orpheufti 
Rock Island 

Spencer Square 

Majestic 

Springfield 

Gaiety 
Lyric 
Vaudette 
Princess 
Empress 
Waukegan 
Academy 

INDIANA 

Anderson 

Starland 

Riviera 
Bloomington 

Harris Grand 
Bluffton 

Gaiety 

Grand 
Clinton 

Wonderland 

Gem 

Connersville 

Auditorium 

Lyric 

Vaudette 
Crawfordsville 

Strand 

Ark 
E. Chicago 

Bartley 
Evansville 

Orpheum 

Criterion 

Strand 
Fort Wayne 

Orpheum 

Strand 

Jefferson 
Gary 

Gem 

Casino 

Art 

Gary 

Goshen 

Goshen 
Jefferson 
Hammond 
Parthenon 

Huntington 

Perfect 

New Huntington 
Indiana Harbor 

Columbia 



297 



"THE HIDDEN LIGHT" 

Starring DOLORES CASSINELLI 

Is Making Big Money for State Right Buyers and Exhibitors 




SOME TERRITORY OPEN 

COMMONWEALTH FILM CORPORATION 

1600 Broadway SAM 7JERLER, President New York City 



298 



Indianapolis 

Ohio 

Rialto 

Circle 

Colonial 

Mr. Smith's 

Alhambra 

English O. H. 
Kendallville 

New Strand 

Princess 
Kokomo 

Isis 

Paramount 

Victory 

Lafayette 

Luna 
La Porte 

Princess 
Logansport 

Paramount 

Colonial 
Marion 

Lyric 

Marion 
Michigan City 

Starland 

Muncie 

Star 

Columbia 
New Castle 

Royal 

Princess 
Noblesville 

Wild's Opera House 

Olympic 
Peru 

Victoria 
Richmond 

Mtirette 

Murray 
Shelbyville 

Strand 

Alhambra 
South Bend 

Auditorium 

Blackstone 

Oliver 
Terre Haute 

Liberty 
• American 

Orpheum 
Vincennes 

Moon 

Alice 

Strand 
Wabash 

Eagle 
Washington 

G. Opera House 

Liberty 

IOWA 

Ames 

Twin-Star 
Princess 
Boone 
Princess 



Burlington 

Garrick 

Palace 
Cedar Rapids 

Strand 

Crystal 

Isis 

Palace 
Clinton 

Strand 

Amusu 
Council Bluffs 

Strand 
Davenport 

Garden 

Family 
Des Moines 

Royal 

Palace 

Rialto 

Casino 

Garden 

Des Moines 

Strand 

Majestic 
Dubuque 

Strand 

Grand 
Ft. Dodge 

Strand 

Rialto 
Iowa City 

Pastime 

Strand 

Englert 
Keokuk 

Keokuk 

Colonial 

Dodge's 

Grand Opera House 
Mason City 

Palace 
Regent 
Bijou 
Marshalltown 

Strand 
Muscatine 

Palace 

Amusu 
Oelwein 

Gem 
Ottumwa 

Rex 

Circle 

National 

Princess 
Sioux City 

Princess 

Royal 
Washington 



Palace 
Plaza 

KANSAS 

Beloit 

Grand 
Chanute 

Peoples 



Coffeyville 

Columbia 

Tackett 
Dodge City 

Beesum 

Rath 
El Dorado 

Royal 

Belmont 

Gem 
Emporia 

Electric 

Emporia 

Strand 
Ft. Scott 

Liberty 

Empress 
Great Bend 

Echo 
Hutchison 

Royal 

De Luxe 

Midland 
Kansas City 

Electric 
Manhattan 

Marshal 

Vareham 
Ottawa 

Crystal Pastime 
Parsons 

Liberty 

New Elks 

Best 
Pittsburg 

New Brand 

Klock 
Salina 

Strand 

Palace 
Topeka 

Cozy 

Orpheum 

Isis 
Wichita 

Wichita 

Palace 

Regent 

Holland 

Princess 
Winfield 

Zennis 

Novelty 

KENTUCKY 
Ashland 

Grand 
Bowling Green 

Princess 
Danville 

Stout's 
Fulton 

Grand 

Orpheum 
Hopkinsville 

Princess 
Henderson 

Princess 

Grand 

Opera House 



299 



SHORT SUBJECTS 

are a necessity for your success— 



KNOW THIS: 

That 

Considering Stars 
Considering Directors 
Considering Stories 
Considering Quality 
Considering Quantity 
Considering Service 
Considering Price 

The Film Company best equipped 
to please your PATRONS and YOU 

IS 



SPECIAL PICTURES CORPORATION 

Short Subject Specialists Branch Offices Everywhere 



300 



Lexington 

Ada Meade 

Strand 
Louisville 

Walnut 

Mary Anderson 
Alamo 

Keith's Strand 
Majestic 
Olympia 
Newport 

Colonial 
Temple 
Middlesboro 

Brownie 

LOUISIANA 
Baton Rouge 

Louisiana 
Columbia 
Crowley 

Acadia 

Donaldsonville 

Grand 
Jennings 

Princess 
Lafayette 

Jefferson 
Lake Charles 

Arcade 
Minden 

Scout 
Monroe 

Lyceum 

Saenger 
Morgan City 

Evangeline 
Natchitoches 

Amusu 
New Iberia 

Elks 

Opera House 

Franklin 
New Orleans 

Strand 

Globe 

Liberty 

Tudor 

Trianon 

Palace 
Plaquemine 

Wilbert 
Ruston 

Astor 
Shreveport 

Alexandria 

Saenger 

MAINE 

Augusta 

Colonial 

Bangor 
Park- 
Bijou 

Biddeford 
Opera House 

Gardner 
Strand 



Lewiston 

Empire 

Strand 
Portland 

Empire 

Casino 

Strand 
Rumford Falls 

Majestic 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

Wizard 
Parkway 
Blue Mouse 
Rivoli 
Cumberland 
Strand 
Empire 
Liberty 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Boston 

Park 

Modern 

Beacon 

Keith's Boston 

Gordon's Olympia 

Gordon's Scolley Sq. 
Cambridge 

Gordon's Central Sq. 
Chelsea 

Olympia 
Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Strand 
E. Boston 

Central Square 
Everett 

Olympia 

Broadway 
Fall River" 

Bijou 

Rialto 

Empire 

Music Hall 

Empire 
Gloucester 

North Shore 

Strand 
Greenfield 

Lawler 

Victoria 
Holyoke 

Suffolk 
Lawrence 

Empire 

Rialto 

Strand 
Lowell 

Crown 

Owl 

Merrimac 
Strand 
New Jewel 
Royal 
Leominster 
Gem 

Music Hall 



Lynn 

Olympia 

Mark-Strand 

Waldorf 
Maiden 

Orpheum 

Mystic 
New Bedford 

Olympia 

Colonial 

Orpheum 
Newton 

Olympia 
Olympia 

Cambridge 
Pittsfield 

Union Square 

Colonial 
Sommerville 

Union Square 

Highland Avenue 
Springfield 

Bijou 

Palace 

Capital 

Broadway 

Fox 
Taunton 

Park 
Worcester 

New Park 

Mark Strand 

Poli's 

Olympia 

MICHIGAN 
Ann Arbor 

Majestic 
Bay City 

Bijou 

Regent 

Washington 

Strand 

Orpheum 
Battle Creek 

Regent 

Garden 

Strand 

Post 
Calumet 

Calumet 

Royal 
Detroit 

Miles 

Majestic 

Adams 

Wm. Fox's Washington 
Broadway Strand 
Madison 
Regent 

New Allen house now 
building 
Escanaba 

Delft 
Flint 

Regent 
Garden 
Palace 



301 



Arthur Donaldson Productions 

Inc. 





Screen Productions 

"THE PURGATORY OF 
DAVID DROOD" 

and 

'THE VICTORIOUS ROMANCE' 
Two Original Photoplays 

By Templar Saxe 

'A'ROMANCE OF THE NORTH' 
A Comedy-Drama 

By Arthur Donald so n 



Stage Productions In Preparation 



"SUN VALLEY" 
A Comedy-Drama 
By Chester De Vonde 



"THE ETERNAL TRIANGLE" 
A Powerful Drama 

By Edward Phillips 



THE CONQUEROR" 
A Musical Drama 
By Arthur Donaldson, J. Le Pierre Brigham and Templar Saxe 

ARTHUR DONALDSON 

Star and General Director of Productions 



JULIUS TIMM . President 

LOUIS DE LYONS ....... Vice-President and Treasurer 

EIVIND ERICHSEN Secretary and General Manager 



CHARLES A. SHAW Manager of Productions 

WILLARD KING BRADLEY . . Director of Publicity and Advertising 

Executive Offices: 
ROOM 2001, 220 WEST FORTY-SECOND STREET 
(Candler Building) New York City, N. Y. 



302 



Grand Rapids 

Majestic Gardens 

Strand 

Starland 

Isis 
Hancock 

Keredge 
Jackson 

Majestic 

Family 

Orpheum 

Rex 
Kalamazoo 

Regent 

Majestic 

Palace 
Lansing 

Bijou 

Colonial 

Gladmere 
Marquette 

Opera House 
Muskegon 

Regent 

Majestic 
Owasso 

Strand 
Pontiac 

Oakland 
- Eagle 
Pt. Huron 

Family 

New American 

Maxino 

Majestic 
Sault Ste. Marie 

Temple 

Star 
Saginaw 

Franklin 

Mecca 

Regent 

Auditorium 
Ypsilanti 

Martha Washington 
MINNESOTA 
Brainerd 

Park 
Cookston 

Brand 
Duluth 

Zelda 

Sunbeam 

Lyceum 

New Lvric 

Rex 

Garrick 

Strand 

Grand 
Hibbing 

Princess, 

Majestic 
Minneapolis 

Strand 

Palace 

Colonial 

New Garrick 

Garden 

Lyric 



New Unique 

New Astor 

Lyndale 

Bijou 
Rochester 

Rochester 

Empress 

Garden 

Lawler 
St. Cloud 

U. of A. Minor 
St. Paul 

Princess 

Capitol 

Blue Mouse 

Garrick 

Liberty 

Astor 

Starland 

Alhambra 
Virginia 

Lyric 

Grand 

Rex 
Winona 

Colonial 

Opera House 

MISSISSIPPI 

Biloxi 

Crown 
Clarksdale 

Marion 
Columbus 

Princess 
Greenville 

Grand 
Greenwood 

Greenwood 
Gulfport 

Dixie 
Hattiesburg 

Strand 
Jackson 

Majestic 
Meridian 

Princess 

Strand 
McComb City 

Jacobs 
Natchez 

Baker 

Grand 
Picayune 

Arcade 
Vicksburg 

Alamo 
Yazoo City 

Yazoo 

MISSOURI 
Hannibal 

Star 
Joplin 

Electric 

Hippodrome 



Kansas City 

Idle Hour 

Doric 

Newman's 

12ftb St. 

Liberty 

Regent 

Royal 

Loew's Garden 
Moberly 

Grand 

Fourth St. 
St. Joseph 

Electric 

Palace 

Regent 

Alhambra 
St. Louis 

Kings 

Pershing 

Liberty 

West End Lyric 
New Grand Central 
Rialto 
Delmonte 

Downtown Central 
Springfield 

Electric 
Landers 
Sedalia 

Sedalia 

MONTANA 

Anaconda 

Ansonia 

Bluebird 
Butte 

American 

Ansonia 

Liberty 

Rialto" 
Billings 

Babcock 

Regent 

Strand 
Great Falls 

Palace 

Imperial 

Sexton 

Marlow 

Antlers 
Helena 

Marlow 
Lewiston 

Judith 
Miles City 

Iris 

Liberty 

NEBRASKA 
Beatrice 

I rilbert 

Lyric 
Grand Island 

Lyda 
Hartings 

Strand 

Empress 
(Continued on page 481) 



303 




OFFICES: 1214 MARKET ST., PH1LA. 

CONTROLS, OPERATES ANDJJOOKS 
THE FOLLOWING THEATRES: 
IN PHILADELPHIA 



ALHAMBRA 
ALLAN 
ALLEGHENY 
AMBER 
APOLLO 

ARCADE PALACE 

ARCADIA 

AUDITORIUM 

BALTIMORE 

BELL 

BELMONT 

BENN 

BLUEBIRD 

BROAD ST. CASINO 

BROADWAY 

BRUNSWICK 

CAPITOL 

CEDAR 

COLONIAL GTM. 

CROSS KEYS 

DARBY 

EMPRESS 

FAIRMOUNT 

FAMILY 



Allentown, Pa. 
COLONIAL 
HIPPODROME 
REGENT 

Atlantic City, N. J. 
CITY SQUARE 
COLONIAL 
CORT 

CRITERION 

GLOBE 



S6TH ST. THEATRE 

58TH ST. THEATRE 

FRANKLIN 

FRANKFORD 

GLOBE (Jun. and Mar.) 

GLOBE (59th and Mar.) 

GREAT NORTHERN 

IMPERIAL, 60th St. 

IMPERIAL, 2nd St. 

JUMBO 

LEADER 

LEHIGH PALACE 

LIBERTY 

LINCOLN 

LOCUST 

LOGAN 

LOGAN AUDITORIUM 
333 MARKET ST. 
MAINHEIM 
MODEL 

NEW BROADWAY 

NIXON 

ONTARIO 

OVERBROOK 



ORIENT 

PARKWAY 

PALACE 

PASCHALL 

WM. PENN 

PLAZA 

POINT BREEZE 

PRINCESS 

REGENT 

K J ALTO 

RIDGE 

RIVOLI 

ROXBOROUGH 

RUBY 

SAVOY 

SHERWOOD 

SOMERSET 

STANLEY 

STAR 

STRAND 

\TCTORIA 

WEST ALLEGHENY 

WISH ART 



OUTSIDE OF PHILADELPHIA 



WASHBURN 

WASHINGTON 
Dover, Del. 

DOVER OPERA HOUSE 
Easton, Pa. 

COLONIAL 

THIRD ST. 
Gloucester, N. J. 

PALACE 

A I'OI.I.i > 



KEITH'S GARDEN PIER Haddon Heights, N. J. 



VIRGINIA 

STEEL PIER 
Berwick, Pa. 

OPERA HOUSE 

PALACE 

TEMPLE 
Burlington, N. J. 

AUDITORIUM 
Camden, N. J. 

COLONIAL 

FAMILY 

FORREST HILL 

GARDEN 

GRAND 

LIBERTY 

LYRIC 

PLAZA 

PRINCESS 

TEMPLE 

TOWERS 
Collingswood, N. J, 

AUDITORIUM 
Conshohocken, Pa. 

OPERA HOUSE 
Cape May, N. J. 

LIBERTY 

PALACE 

CITY PIER 
Carlisle. Pa. 

OPERA HOUSE 
Chester, Pa. 

GRAND 



HUNT'S 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
CAPITOL 
COLONIAL 
GRAND 
VICTORIA 
Lancaster, Pa. 
GRAND 
HAMILTON 
Lebanon, Pa. 
ACADEMY 
STRAND 
Milton, Pa. 

BIJOU DREAM 
Norristown, Pa. 
GARRICK 
GRAND 
Ocean City, N. J. 
DOUGHTY'S PIER 
STRAND 
PARK 
Pennsgrove, N. J. 

BROAD 
Pleasantville, N. J. 

STRAND 
Plymouth, Pa. 

PALACE 
Pottstown, Pa. 

HIPPODROME 
Pottsville. Pa. 
GARDEN 

OFFICERS 

1ULES E. MASTBAUM, President 
ALEX. R. BOYD, Vice-President 
TOHN J. McGUIRK, Vice-President 
LAURENCE D. BEGGS. Treasurer 
LEWTS SABLOSKY, Assistant Treasurer 
MORRTS WOLF, Secretary 



Pittston, Pa. 

ROMAN 
Reading, Pa. 
ARCADIA 
COLONIAL 
LYRIC 
ORPHEUM 
PRINCESS 
SAN TOY 

SCHUYLKILL AVE. 
STRAND 
Scranton, Pa. 

STRAND 
Shenandoah, Pa. 

ARCADE 
South Bethlehem, Pa. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE 
LEHIGH ORPHEUM 
PALACE 
Trenton. N. J. 

STATE STREET 
West Chester, Pa. 
GRAND 
IDLE HOUR 
RIALTO 
Wildwood, N. J. 
AVENUE 
BLAKER'S 
CASINO 
COMIQUE 
REGENT 
STRAND 
Wilkes- Barre, Pa. 

SAVOY 
Wilmington, Del. 
MATESTIC 
QUEEN 
Williamsport, Pa. 

KEENEY'S 
York. Pa. 

HIPPODROME 
DIRECTORS 
GEORGE H. EARLE, JR. 
ABE SABLOSKY 
FRANK W. BUHLER 
ADOLPH ZUKOR 

tohn McCarthy 
Walter vincent 



304 



City, State and Federal Regulations 



FEDERAL LAWS AND REG- 
ULATIONS 

Copyright 

Section 9532. (11) Works no) reproduced .or 
sale. -^Copyright may also tic bad of the works of 
an author, of which copies are not reproduced 
for sale, by the deposit, with claim of copyright, 
* * * of a title and description, with one nrint 
taken from each scene or act. if the work be a 
motion picture photoplay : * * * of a title and 
description, with not less than two prints taken 
from different sections of a complete motion pic- 
ture, if the work be a motion picture other than 
a nhotoplay. » * ♦ But the privilege of registra- 
tion of copyright secured hereunder shall not ex- 
empt the conyright proprietor from the deposit 
of conies, under sections twelve (Section 9533) 
aod thirteen (Section 9534) of this act, where the 
work is later reproduced in copies for sale. 

Section 9533. (12) After copyright has been se- 
cured by nublication of the work with the notice 
of copyright as provided in section 9 of this act, 
there shall be propmtly deposited in the copyright 
office or in the mail addressed to the register of 
copyrights, Washington, D. C, two complete 
copies of the best edition thereof then published 

* * or if the work is not reproduced in copies 
or copy, print, photograph, or other reproduction 
to be accomnanied in each case by a claim of 
copyright. No action or proceeding shall be 
maintained for infringement of copyright in any 
work until the provisions of this Act with respect 
to the deposit of copies and registration of such 
work shall have been complied with. 

Section 9534. (13) Should the copies called for 
by section 12 of this act not be promptly depos- 
ited as herein provided, the register of copyrights 
may at any time after the publication of the work, 
upon actual notice, require the proprietor of the 
copyright to deposit them, and after the said de- 
mand shall have been made, in default of the de- 
posit of copies of the work within three months 
within any part of the United States * * * or 
within six months from any outlying territorial 
possession of the United States, or from any for- 
eign country, the proprietor of the copyright shall 
be liable to a fine of one hundred dollars and to 
pay to the Library of Congress twice the amount 
of the retail price of the best edition of the work 
and the copyright shall become void. (U. S. Com- 
piled Statutes. 1918. p. 1541.) 

Section 9521. Classification of application for 
registration. — The application for registration shall 
specify to which of the following classes the work 
in which copyright is claimed belongs: 

CI) Motion picture photo plays. 

(m) Motion pictures other than photo plays. 

Provided, nevertheless. That the above specifi- 
cations shall not be held to limit the subject mat- 
ter of copyright as defined in section 4 of this act, 
nor shall error in classification invalidate or im- 
pair the copyright protection secured under this 
act (1909, 1912). (Compiled U. S. Statutes. 191'8. 
p. 1539.) 

T. Hartley Manners vs. Oliver Morosco. • * • 
The case was brought by J. Hartley Manners, au- 
thor of "Peg o' My Heart." the right for the 
theatrical presentation of which had been given by 
contract for ■a period of years to Oliver Morosco, 
who also claimed that the theatrical contract also 
impliedly carried with it the movie right. This 
contention was rejected by the Supreme Court. 
Tustices Clarke and Pitnev dissented. (United 
States Supreme Court Report for March 22. 1920.) 

Loan. Rental or Sale of Films 

Section 8320. (Act Oct. 1, 1918. c. 178.) The 
Secretary of Agriculture is authorized, under such 
rules and regulations and subject to such condi- 
tions as he may prescribe, to loan, rent, or sell 
copies of films : Provided. That in the sale or 
rental of films educational institutions or associa- 
tions for agricultural education not organized for 
profit shall have preference : all moneys received 
from such rentals or sales to be covered into the 



Treasury of the United States as miscellaneous 
receipts. (U. S. Compiled Statutes, 1916, Anno- 
tated. Supplement, 1919, v. 1, p. 78.) 

Immoral Films Prohibited 

That section 245 of the Act entitled "An Act 
to codify, revise, and amend the penal laws of 
the United States," approved March 4, 1909, U 
hereby amended to read as follows : 

Section 245. Whoever shall bring or cause to 
be brought into the United States, or any place 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, from any for- 
eign country, or shall therein knowingly deposit or 
cause to be deposited with any express company 
or other common carrier, for carriage from one 
State, Territory or District of the United States 
or place noncontiguous to but subject to the jur- 
isdiction thereof, to any other State, Territory or 
District of the United States, or place noncontig- 
uous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof, or 
from any place in or subject to the jurisdiction of 
the United States, through a foreign country, to 
any place in or subject to the jurisdiction thereof, 
or from any place in or subject to the jurisdiction 
of the United States to a foreign country, any 
obscene, lewd, or lascivious, or any filthy book, 
pamphlet, picture, motion picture film, paper, let- 
ter, writing, print, or other matter of indecent 
character, * * * or whoever shall knowingly take or 
cause to be taken from such express company cr 
other common carrier any matter or thing the 
depositing of which for carriage is herein made 
unlawful, shall be fined not more than $5,000 or 
imprisoned not more than five years, or both. 
(Approved, June 5, 1920, 66th Congress.) 

Prize Fight Films 

Section 10416. Tt shall be unlawful for any 
person to deposit or cause to be deposited in the 
United States mails for mailing or delivery, or to 
deposit, or cause to be deposited with any express 
company or other common carrier for carriage, 
or to send or carry from one state or territory of 
the United States or the District of Columbia, or 
to bring or to cause to be brought into the United 
States from abroad, any film or other pictorial 
representation of any prize fight or encounter of 
pugilists, under whatever name, which is designed 
to be used or mav be used for purposes of public 
exhibition. (1413.) 

Section 10417. Receiving for sale or exhibition. — 
It shall be unlawful for any person to take or re- 
ceive from tlie mails, or any express company or 
other common carrier,, with intent to sell, dis- 
tribute, circulate, or exhibit, or exhibit any matter 
or thing herein forbidden to be deposited for 
mailing, delivery, or carriage in interstate com- 
merce. (1912.) 

Section 10418. Punishment. — Any person vio- 
lating any of the provisions of this Act shall for 
each offense, upon conviction thereof, be fined not 
more than $1000.00, or sentenced to imprisonment 
at hard labor for not more than one year, or both 
at the discretion of the court. (1912.) (Com- 
piled U. S. Statutes, 1918, p. 1712.) 

Mail, Films Sent By; Requirements 

By direction of the Postmaster General the Sec- 
ond Assistant Postmaster General issued the fol 
lowing order, which appeared Mav 15, 1919, in the 
daily Postal Bulletin (No. 11956): 

"Washington, May 9, 1919. 

"Postmasters are directed to exercise special 
care in accepting motion picture films for ship- 
ment in the mails, to see that the containers are in 
good condition, and have attached thereto the re- 
quired 'Caution' label. Containers for motion pic- 
tures must complj with the following require- 
ments: "Moving picture films must be packed in 
tightly closed metal cases inclosed in a strong, 
spark proof wooden box, or in spark-proof cases 
made of sheet-iron not less than 0.02-inch thick 
(No. 25 U. S. Standard gauge) and lined through- 
out with fiber board at least one-eighth inch thick, 
or some equivalent insulating material. The cov- 
ers <>f these cases must tit tightly and must lap 
over the body at least five-eighths inch on the 
sides, forming a tight joint." 



305 



A Year of Achievements for 
Cosmopolitan Productions 
1920-1921 



A Year of Coming Achievements for 
Cosmopolitan Productions 



PRODUCING SUPER-PRODUCTIONS FROM THE WORKS 
OF THE WORLD'S GREATEST AUTHORS 



306 



All packages containing motion picture films 
must have attached thereto by the shipper a dia- 
mond-shaped yellow label, each side 4 inches long, 
with the wording printed in black lettehs inside of 
a black-line border measuring three and one-half 
inches on each side, reading as follows : 

"Notice to Postal Employees, Caution. Keep 
Fire and Light Away. Sweep up and remove care- 
fully contents of broken packages. This is to cer- 
tify that the articles are properly described by 
name and are packed and marked, are in proper 
condition for transportation, according to regula- 
tions prescribed by the Post Office Department. 

Shipper's Name." 

All such packages must be placed in cars and 
offices in positions that will permit of their ready 
removal in case of fire. They must not be loaded 
in cars nor stored in stations or offices in contact 
with steam pipes or other sources of heat. Otto 
I'raeger, Second Assistant Postmaster General. 

Films Sent by Parcel Post. Motion picture 
films must be packed in tightly-closed metal cases 
inclosed in strong sparkproof wooden boxes. 
Packages must he plainly marked "Motion Pic- 
ture Films" and have attached thereto the required 
diamond-shaped yellow caution label. This does 
not apply to non-inflammable films made of cellu- 
lose acetate. (Postal Guide, July, 1919, p. 21.) 

Protection of the Uniform 

Section 1949a. (Act June 3, 1916, c. 134, par. 
125, as amended. Act July 9, 1918, c. 143, sub- 
chapter 17, par. 10.) It shall be unlawful for any 
person not an officer or enlisted man of the United 
States Army, Navy or Marine Corps, to wear the 
duly prescribed uniform of the United States 
Army, Navy or Marine Corps, or any distinctive 
part of such uniform, or a uniform any part of 
which is similar to a distinctive part of the duly 
prescribed uniform of the United States Army. 
Navy or Marine Corps : Provided, That the fore- 
going provision shall not be construed so as to 
prevent * * * any person from wearing the uni- 
form of the United States Army, Navy or Marine 
Corps in any playhouse or theater or in moving 
picture films while actually engaged in represent- 
ing therein a military or naval character not tend- 
ing to bring discredit or reproach upon the United 
States Army, Navy or Marine Corps * * *. U. S. 
Compiled Statutes, 1916 (Annotated Supplement, 
1919, v. 1, pp. 490-491). 

Shipment of Films 

The United States Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission prescribes the way in which motion pic- 
ture films shall be shipped. 

July 15, 1918. Revised regulations. 

Paragraph 43. (a) Motion picture films must be 
packed in spark-proof metal boxes or cans com- 
plying with Specification No. 321. Not more than 
•eight reels (approximately 1,000 feet each) may be 
packed in one such outside container. 

(b) Motion picture films may also be packed in 
outside wooden boxes complying with Specifica- 
tion No. 19, provided each reel is placed in a 
tightly closed inside metal container. The gross 
weight of such a package must not exceed 200 
pounds. 

(f) Shipments of motion picture film with adver- 
tising matter attached to the outside container 
must not be offered for shipment. Shippers desir- 
ing to include advertising matter with their ship- 
ments of motion picture film must place the same 
inside the outside box containing the film. 

Paragraph 1864. (a) Unless exempted on ac- 
count of quantity or method of packing (see col- 
umns 3 and 5, list. par. 1807), all packages con- 
taining dangerous articles named in the list, para- 
graph 1807, and similar articles defined by para- 
graphs 1802 and 1806, inclusive, must be conspicu- 
ously labeled by the shipper. Labels should be ap- 
plied when practicable to that part of the package 
bearing the consignee's name and address. 

Paragraph 1865. Labels must be of diamond 
shape, with each side 4 inches long. The color is 
red for inflammable liquids and compressed in- 
flammable gases, yellow for inflammable solids and 
oxidizing materials, green for non-inflammable 
compressed gases, and white for corrosive liquids. 
Labels must conform to standards as to size, print- 
ing and color, and samples will be furnished, on 
request, by the chief inspector of the Bureau of 
Kxplosives. 30 Vescy Street, New York City. 



Tariff Schedule— Dutiable List— Chap. A 

Section 5291 — Paragraph 380. Photographic 
cameras, and parts thereof, not specially provided 
for in this section, photographic dry plates, not 
specially provided for in this section, 15 per centum 
ad valorem ; photographic film negative's, imported 
in any form, for use in any way in connection with 
moving picture exhibits, or for making or repro- 
ducing pictures for such exhibits, exposed but not 
developed, 2 cents per lineal or running foot; pho- 
tographic film positives, imported in any form, for 
use in any way in connection with moving picture 
exhibits, including herein all moving, motion, mo- 
tophotography or cinematography film pictures, 
prints, positives or duplicates of every kind and 
nature, and of whatever substance made, 1 cent 
per linear or running foot : Provided, however, 
That all photographic films imported under this 
section shall be subject to such censorship as may 
be imposed by the Secretary of the Treasury! 
(United States Compiled Statutes, 1918, p. 829.) i 

Taxes on Films 

Section 6309 4/5g. Act February 24, 1919, c ( 
18, par. 906.) On and after the 1st of May, .1919) 
any person engaged in the business of leasing o% 
licensing for exhibition positive motion picturd 
films containing pictures ready for projection shall 
pay monthly an excise tax in respect to carrying 
on such business equal to 5 per centum of the 
total rentals earned from each such lease or li- 
cense during the preceding month. If a person 
owning such a film exhibits it for profit he shall 
pay a tax equivalent to 5 per centum of the fair 
rental or license value of such film at the time and 
place where and for the period during which ex : 
hibited. If any such person has, prior to Decem- 
ber 6th, 1918, made a bona fide contract with any 
person for the lease or licensing, after the tax 
imposed by this section takes effect, of such a film 
for exhibition or profit, and if such contract does 
not permit the adding of the whole of the tax 
imposed by this section to the amount to be paid 
under such contract then the lessee or license 
shall, in lieu of the lessor or licensor, pay so much 
of such tax as is not so permitted to be added tc) 
the contract price. The tax imposed by this see- 
tion shall be in lieu of the tax imposed by subdi- 
visions (c) and (d) of section 600 of the Revenue 
Act of 1917. (40 Stat. 1125.) U. S. Compiled 
Statutes, 1916. (Annotated Supplement, 1919, v> 
1, p. 1267.) ! 
Excise Taxes 

Section 6309 4/5b. (Act February 24, IV 19, c. 
18, par. 901.) (These provisions constitute Title 
IX. of the Revenue Act of 1918, same; sale or 
lease price.) If any person manufactures, pro- 
duces or imports any article enumerated in sec- 
tion 900, or leases or licenses for exhibition any 
positive motion picture film containing a picture 
ready for projection, and, whether through any 
agreement, arrangement, or understanding, of 
otherwise, sells, leases or licenses such article at 
less than a fair market price obtainable therefor, 
either (a) in such manner as directly or indirectly 
to benefit such person or any person, or (b) with 
intent to cause such benefit, the amount for which 
such article is sold, leased or licensed shall be 
taken to be the amount which would have been 
received from the sale, lease, or license of such 
article il sold, leased or licensed at the fair market 
price. (Revenue Act of 1918.) (U. S. Compiled 
Statutes, 1916, Supplement, 1919, f. 1, p. 1265 ) 

(To Collectors of Internal Revenue and others 
concerned:) Article 5 of Repulations 56 is here- 
by amended to read as follows: "Article 5. An 
exhibitor who is also an owner of a film, and who 
exhibits the film for profit must pay a tax equiv- 
alent to 5 per cent of the fair rental value of the 
film were it leased or licensed for exhibition. 

"The fair rental or license value of a film ex- 
hibited by an owner for profit shall ordinarily be 
held to be represented by the net profits he de- 
rives therefrom, which shall be determined by 
deducting from his gross receipts his reasonable ex- 
penses or allowances for services (but no deduc- 
tion will be permitted for such items as expenses 
of production, upkeep or replacement of films) ; 
l>ut should his return show that such net profits do 
not amount to 33 1-3 per cent of his gross receipts 
lie shall accompany his return with a statement in 
■ '■ tail showing the items entering into the expenses 



307 



MARION DAVIES 

Cosmopolitan Star 




Current Release 

"THE RESTLESS SEX" 

By Robert W. Chambers 

Directed by Robert Z. Leorard 

Marion Davies does the best work of her career in the role of 
Stephanie. Not only does she display a much greater sense of 
repose before the camera but her facial expressions reveal a care, 
clarity of purpose and conviction that are striking. 

— From WidSi 



308 



and allowances charged against such receipts 
ihis ruling applies to cases where the owner ex- 
hibit or intends to exhibit the film over an ex- 
tended period, as distinguished from a limited pe- 
riod for advertising or other purposes. 
, .. ". r ^ e , fair rental or license value of a film ex- 
hibited by an owner for a limited period as a part 
ot an advertising or other program intended to 
enhance the future rental or license value of the 
him shall be based on the actual rental received tor 
the film at the expiration of that period by the 
owner or by the person purchasing state or other 
territorial rights therein. An owner-exhibitor un- 
der such circumstances shall accompany his re- 
turn with a statement showing the actual amounts 
lor which the film has been leased and in what 
city or cities, and at what theater or theaters it is 
to be shown.— Signed : Paul F. Myers, Acting 
Commission of Internal Revenue. Approved April 
10, 1920, D. F. Houston, Secretary of Treasury. 
(Federal Trade Information Service, April 13 
1920, p. 82.) 

Internal Revenue 

Section 6309 }^ a. From and after the first day 
of November, 1917, there shall be levied, assessed, 
collected and paid (a) a tax of 1 cent for each 10 
cents or fraction thereof of the amount paid for 
admission to any place, including admission by 
season ticket, or subscription, to be paid by the 
person paying for such admission : Provided, That 
the tax on admission of children under 12 years 
of age where an admission charge for such children 
is made, shall in every case be 1 cent. * * * 

Section 6309 y 2 c. (Where persons, except city 
officials in the performance of their official duties, 
are admitted to any place where an admission is 
charged, a colection of the tax must be made. 
United States Compiled Statutes, 1918, p. 1004- 
1005.) 

Section 6309}$a. There shall be levied, assessed, 
collected and paid, — (c) Unexposed moving pic- 
ture films — Upon all moving picture films (which 
have not been exposed) sold by the manufacturer 
or importer a tax equivalent to one-fourth of 1 
cent per lineal foot; and (b) Positive moving pic- 
ture films, — Upon all positive moving picture films 
(containing a picture ready for projection) sold 
or leased by the manufacturer, producer or im- 
porter, a tax equivalent to one-half of 1 cent per 
lineal foot. (United States Compiled Statutes, 
1918. p. 1005.) 

Vendee's or Lessee's Tax Obligation 

Section 6348b. Payment of taxes by vendee or 
lessee; dealer defined. — (a) If any person, corpo- 
ration, partnership, or association has prior to 
May 9, 1917, made a bona fide contract with a 
dealer for the sale, after the tax takes effect, of 
any article (or, in the case of moving picture films, 
such a contract with a dealer, exchange or exhib- 
itor, for the sale or lease thereof) upon which a 
tax is imposed under Title 3, 4 or 6, or under sub- 
division 13 of Schedule A of Title 8, or under this 
section, and (b) if such contract does not permit 
the adding of the whole of such tax to the amount 
to he paid under such contract, then the vendee cr 
lessee shall, in lieu ' of the vendor or lessor, pay 
so much of such tax as is not so permitted to be 
added to the contract price. 

The tax payable by the vendee or lesssee under 
this section shall be paid to the vendor, or lessor 
ot the time the sale or lease is consummated, and 
collected, returned, and paid to the United States 
by such vendor or lessor in the same manner as 
provided in section 503. 

The term "dealer" as used in this section in- 
cludes a vendee who purchases any article with 
intent to use it in the manufacture or production 
of another article intended for sale. (Compiled 
United States Stat utes. 1918. p. 1034.) 

Proposed Federal Legislation 
Motion Picture Censorship Bill 

(Mr Flushes introduced in the House of Repre- 
sentatives. December 6, 1915. a bill (456) creating 
a Federal Motion Picture Commission. It was 
referred to the Committee on Education, The bill 
created a sensation among the theatrical moving 
picture interests, and a brief was printed against 
the passage of the bill. The brief was by Wil- 
liam H. Seabury. Fsq., of the New York Bar. and 
counsel for the Motion Picture Hoard of Trade of 
America. Inc. The bill failed of passage.) 



Other Proposed Legislation 

During the last (1920) session of Congress. Con- 
gressman Harreld presented a bill (H. R. 11557) 
the substance of which was : To prohibit ship- 
ment, exhibition of moving picture films purport- 
ing to' show or simulate the acts of ex-convic»s. 
desperadoes, bandits, train robbers, bank robbers, 
or outlaws, and to prohibit the use of mails in car- 
rying same, and providing punishment. Referred 
to Judiciary Committee. 

Senator Gore, at the same time introduced, by 
request, a bill (S. 3674), the purport of which 
was: Prohibiting the bringing into the United 
States and the carrying and transporting therein, 
from one State, Territory or District, of pictures, 
films, moving picture film or films, purporting to 
show or to simulate the acts and conduct of ex- 
convicts, desperadoes, bandits, train robbers, bank 
robbers, or outlaws, in the commission or at- 
tempted commission of crime or acts of violence ; 
and to prohibit the use of the mails in carrying 
communications relating to the same, and providing 
punishment therefor; to the Committee on Inter- 
state Commerce. Neither bill passed. 

Congressman Henry T. Rainey introduced a bill 
(H. R. 12000) which designed: To punish trans- 
portation of stolen motion picture films in inter- 
state and foreign commerce. 

STATE LAWS 

Illinois— 1917 

Section 224-a. It shall be unlawful for any per- 
son, firm or corporation to manufacture, sell or 
offer for sale, advertise or publish, present or ex- 
hibit in any public place in this state any litho- 
graph, moving picture, play, drama or sketch, 
which publication or exhibition portrays depravity, 
criminality, unchastity, or lack of virtue of a class 
of citizens, of any race, color, creed or religion, 
which said publication or exhibition exposes the 
citizens of any race, color, or creed or religion to 
contempt, derision or obloquy or which is pro- 
ductive of breach of the peace or riots. Any per- 
son, firm or corporation violating any of the pro- 
visions of this section, shall be guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and upon conviction thereof, shall be pun- 
ished by a fine of not less than fifty dollars, nor 
more than two hundred dollars. (Laws, 1917, p. 
362.) 

Section 224 -b. It shall be unlawful for any per- 
son, firm or corporation, to manufacture, sell, or 
offer for sale, or advertise or present or exhibit in 
any public place in the State any publication or 
representation by lithograph, moving picture, play, 
drama or sketch representing or purporting to 
represent any hanging, lynching or burning of any 
human being. Any person, firm or corporation 
violating any of the provisions of this section shall 
be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction 
thereof, shall be punished by a fine of not less 
than fifty dollars nor more than two hundred dol- 
lars. (Amendment to above. Laws 1917, p. 362.) 

Section 224^. That any person who prepares, 
advertises, gives, presents, or participates in any 
obscene or indecent drama, play, exhibition, show 
or entertainment, and every person aiding or abet- 
ting such act, and every owner or lessee or man- 
ager of any theater, moving picture house, gar- 
den, building, room, place or structure, who leases 
or lets the same or permits the same to be used 
for the purposes of such draina, play, exhibition, 
show or entertainment, or wlio assents to the use 
of the same for any such purpose, shall be guilty 
of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof, 
shall, for the first violation of this act, be subject 
to a fine of not less than twenty-five dollars nor 
more than two hundred dollars, or imprisonment in 
the county jail or house for not to exceed one 
year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the 
discretion of the court : and for each subsequent 
offense, the defendant shall be subject to a fine of 
not less than fifty dollars nor more than five hun- 
dred dollars, or imprisonment in the county jail or 
house of correction for not to exceed one year, 
or both such fine and imprisonment, in the dis- 
cretion of the Court. (Amendment to above Act. 
Laws 1917. p. 337. Illinois Revised Stat., 191, pp. 
999-1000.) 

Kansas— 1917 

Kill providing for Kansas Hoard of Review 
passed. 



309 



1920 

Cosmopolitan Achievements 

"THE RESTLESS SEX" 

Marion Davies Greatest Success 

"HUMORESQUE" 

The 1Q20 Screen Classic 



310 



Kansas — 1919 

In this act provision is made that 10 per cent cf 
the reecipts from fees for the examination of mov- 
ing pictures, etc., shall be credited to the general 
revenue fund of the state "to reimburse said fund 
for the expenses of printing, legal advice, auditing 
and handling accounts and funds and all other 
general expenses which are paid out of the gen- 
eral revenue fund but which are properly charge- 
able to the Kansas Board of Review department." 

All money now in the state treasury to the 
credit of the Board of Review is made available 
for the salaries and expenses during the fiscal 
years ending June 30th, 1920, and June 30, 1921. 
(Kansas: Laws 1919, pp. 19-20. Digested.) 

Louisiana — 1914 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assem- 
bly of the State of Louisiana : That any city, 
town or village in this state shall from and after 
the promulgation of this act, through its proper 
legislative branch, be authorized and empowered 
to adopt any ordinance or law for the regulation 
by censorship, of moving picture theaters and 
shows, nickelodeons, theatoriums, penny, five and 
ten cent arcades, and all places of amusement or 
education, showing, operating or displaying motion 
pictures, for which an admission charge has or has 
not been made. 

Section 2. That said ordinance or law designate 
the functions and duties of the censors and their 
number and the mode in which they shall be se- 
lected and the tenure of their office and such com- 
pensation as they may receive, should said censors 
be remunerated for their services. 

Section 3. That said cities, towns and villages 
are hereby authorized to punish any violation of 
said regulation, by fine not exceeding Twenty-five 
Dollars ($25.00) or imprisonment, not to exceed 
thirty (30) days or both at the discretion of the 
Court. 

Section 4. That all laws or parts of laws in 
conflict herewith be, and the same are hereby 
repealed. (Louisiana Laws 1914, pp. 339-340.) 
Maryland— 1916 

Bill passed providing for State Board of Cen- 
sors. 

Massachusetts — 1920 

Proposed censorshipp bill vetoed by 'Governor, 
June 5. 

Missouri 

(For several past legislative sessions held in this 
state, bills have been introduced for the purpose 
of establishing a board of censors of moving pic- 
tures. The bill introduced in the last legislature 
(1919) was a copy of the Pennsylvania law. None 
has so far reached engrossment.) 

Montana — 1907 

Section 8881. Every person who shall exhibit 
moving pictures wherein are shown or exhibited 
to the public any scenes or pictures depicting 
burglaries, train robberies, or other acts which 
would constitute a felony, is guilty of a misde- 
meanor. (Montana Laws 1907, c. 66.) 

New York 

During the legislature of 1920 several bills affect- 
ing the theaters, moving pictures and their exhib- 
itors were introduced. Three of these bills made 
it a misdemeanor for any agent, lessee or owner 
of a theater, or place of amusement to sell in ad- 
vance of the advertised rate, or more than 10 per 
cent above the regular rate. There were an equal 
number of bills that amended the statutes making 
it a misdemeanor to admit any child under six- 
teen to "any dance-house * * * theater or moving 
picture performance * * * unless accompanied by 
its parent or guardian." 

In one of these bills the age was increased to 
eighteen. Another added the words after parent 
or guardian, "or by adult person authorized by its 
parent or guardian," — which in no sense changed 
the law; still another, introduced April 15 by Sen- 
ator S. A. Cotillo. amended the law as follows: 

"But the provisions of this subdivision shall not 
apply to the admission of any such child between 
the ages of ten and sixteen years to any kineto- 
scope or moving picture performance in the city 
of New York in the afternoon of days other than 
school days or after school hours and before eight 



o'clock in the afternoon of school days although 
not accompanied by its parent or guardian, pro- 
vided there shall be established and maintained in 
the place where such performance is held a space 
for such children segregated from the portion there 
of occupied by other patrons which segregated 
space shall be in charge of a matron, whose fit- 
ness and character shall be approved by the So- 
ciety for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children of 
such city, which society may charge a fee not ex- 
ceeding fifteen dollars per annum from each such 
place of amusement for the approval of such ma- 
tron or matrons therein during each year. 

(This latter bill was vigorously antagonized but 
notwithstanding protests it became a law.) 

Senator Cotillo introduced another bill which 
also became a law. It is also in favor of exhib- 
itors, and attempts to weaken the control of the 
manufacturer. It adds a new section to the gen- 
eral business law (Chapter 20 of the consolidated 
laws) which is as follows: 

Section 382-a. Money deposited or advanced for 
use or rental of personal property. Whenever 
money shall be deposited or advanced on a con- 
tract for the use or rental of personal property as 
security for performance of the contract or to be 
applied to payments upon such contract when due, 
such money, with interest accruing thereon, if any, 
until repaid or so applied, shall continue to be the 
money of the person making such deposit or ad- 
vance and shall be a trust fund in the possession 
of the person with whom such deposit or advance 
shall be made and shall be deposited m a bank or 
trust company and shall not be mingled with other 
funds or become an asset of such trustee. 

Section 2 This act shall take effect immedi- 
ately (On March 18, 1920, a bill was introduced 
amending section 2154 of the penal law as fol- 
lows ■ "Section 2154. Motion picture exhibitions 
where an admission fee is charged are hereby pro- 
hibited on the first day of the week." 

North Carolina 

This state provides moving pictures for rural 
communities at the lowest prices. The circuit is 
covered by an automobile with a miniature electric 
plant. The state pays one-third of the expenses. 
Many communities have made money on an ad- 
mission charge of 10 cents. 

Ohio— 1913, 1915 

Bill passed providing for State Board of Cen- 
sors. 

Pennsylvania 

The annual license for any place of amusement, 
buildings, tents or enclosures, or any part there- 
of, situated in any city, borough, or township ot 
this commonwealth, which it used for the exhibi- 
tion of fixed or moving pictures or stereopticjn 
views, exclusively (whether stage scenery and 
apparatus are employed or not), shall be $25.0U. 
irrespective of the number of chairs or seating 
capacity of such place of amusement, buildings, 
tents or enclosures. 

Theaters First-class— Philadelphia : Annual lic_ 
ense, $500.00; second class, where such places cf 
amusement, buildings or tents or enclosures shall 
have over 1,000 chairs, $4,000,000; 1,000 chairs or 
less, and more than 400 chairs, $75,00; 400 chairs 
or less, $30.00. Tn boroughs and townships, ir- 
respective of the number of chairs or seating 
capacity of such places of amusement, $30.00. 
(Purdon's Digest, Sup. 1905 to 1915, v. 5, pp.. 
5265-5266.) 

Section 34. It shall be unlawful for any person 
or persons to give or participate in or for the 
owner or owners of any building, tent, tents or 
any premises, lot, park or common, or any one 
having control thereof, to permit within said build- 
ing, tent * * * any dramatic, theatrical, operatic, 
or vaudeville exhibition, or the exhibition of any 
fixed or moving pictures of a lascivious, 'sacre- 
ligious. obscene, indecent, or of an immoral nature 
and character, or such as might tend to corrupt 
morals. 

Section 35. Any person who shall violate any 
of the provisions of the first section of this act 
shall be guilty of a misdeameanor, and upon con- 
viction thereof shall be sentenced to pay a fine 
not exceeding $1,000, or suffer an imprisonment 
in the jail of the proper country for a period rot 



311 



19^0- 


192 I 


Cosmopolitan Productions 


will include 


"THE WORLD AND HIS WIFE" 


by Jose Echegaray 


"THE INSIDE OF THE CUP" 


by Winston Churchill 


"THE PASSIONATE PILGRIM" 


by Samuel Merwin 


"BURIED TREASURE" 




by F. Britten Austin 


"THE LOVE PIKER" 




by Frank R. and Leslie Adams 


"PROXIES" .... 




by Frank Adams 


"HELIOTROPE . . 




by Richard Washburn Child 


"THE DAUGHTER OF MOTHER McGINN" . . . by Jack Boyle 


"KINDRED OF THE DUST" 


... . by Peter B. Kyne 


"SUPERMAN" 






"THE GOOD PROVIDER" 


» 


: . . by Fannie Hurst 


"BACK PAY" 






"THE YOUNG DIANA" 




by Marie Corelli 


"YELLOW MAGIC" . . 




by F. Britten Austin 


"THE WILD GOOSE" 




by Gouverneur Morris 


"JOSS" 




by Hugh Wiley 


"BEHIND THE VELVET" 




by Lowell Otis Reese 


"UNEASY STREET" . . 




by Arthur Somers Roche 



312 



exceeding one year, or either or both, within the 
discretion of the court. Pennsylvania : Purdon's 
Digest, Supplement, 1916, v. 5.) 

Section 79. It shall be unlawful to sell, lease, 
lend, exhibit, or use any motion picture film, reel, 
or view, in Pennsylvania, unless the said film, reel 
or view has been submitted by the exchange, 
owner, or lessee of the film, reel, or view and 
duly approved by the Pennsylvania state board of 
censors, hereinafter in this act called the board. 

Section 80 provides for Board of Censors. 

South Dakota 

Section 3853. The performance of any tragedy, 
comedy, opera, ballet, farce, negro minstrelsy, 
sparring contest, trial of strength or any part 
or parts therein, and any moving picture show 
of the same * * * where an admission fee is 
charged or anything of value is accepted by the 
manager or any of the players * * * on the first 
day of the week is forbidden ; and every person 
aiding in such exhibition, performance, exercise 
or game, advertisement, posting or otherwise, and 
every owner or lessee * * * who leases the same 
for purposes of such exhibition * * * on the first 
day of the week * * * is guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and upon conviction shall be fined in any sum not 
exceeding $100.00 and not less than $25.00 or to 
be imprisoned in the county jail for a period not 
exceeding 30 days, nor less than 10 days, or be 
subject to both such fine and imprisonment. 
(South Dakota: Revised Code, 1919, v. 1, p. 961.) 

Texas 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any person, 
association, coporation, or any agent or employee 
of any person, association, corporation or re- 
ceiver, partnership or firm, to give or present to 
the public an exhibition of prize fights or glove 
contests, or of any obscene, indecent or immoral 
picture of aaj character whatsoever, by means of 
moving picture films, bioscopes, vitiscopes, magic 
lanterns or other devices in moving picture shows, 
theaters, or any other place whatsoever. 

Section 2. Any person or persons, association, 
or any agent or employee of any person, associa- 
tion, corporation or receiver violating any of the 
provisions of Section 1 of this act, shall, upon 
conviction thereof, be fined in any sum not less 
than one hundred dollars and not more than one 
thousand dollars, or be imprisoned in the county 
jail for not less than ten nor more than sixty 
days, or both, in the discretion of the court or 
jury, and each day's violation of any of the pro- 
visions of this act shall constitute and be punish- 
able as a separate offense. 



ORDINANCES OF THE PRIN- 
CIPAL CITIES OF THE U. S. 

Some General and Specific Powers of 
Mayors and Cities 

To promote public morals and decency, reason- 
able ordinances may be passed to regulate the- 
aters, variety shows, and other places of public 
amusement, and to suppress or prohibit indecent 
or immoral exhibitions at such places. (Treatise 
on the Law of Municipal Corporations, by 
Eugene McQuillin. Chicago, 1912, v. 3, p. 2112.) 

The power to license, tax, regulate (and some- 
times suppress and prohibit) theatrical and other 
exhibitions, shows and amusements, is usu.illy 
conferred upon municipal corporations in express 
terms. 

* * * So like power is generally granted concern- 
ing moving picture shows. However, aside from 
express power to impose a license for revenue, '.ie 
character of the amusement is such as to justify 
reasonable police supervision, and as a proper 
means of regulation, ordinances may require a 
license or permit for which a moderate fee may 
lie charged. (McQuillin. Municipal Corporations, 
v. 3, pp. 2269-70.) 

An ordinance passed under express power which 
requires exhibitors of moving pictures to first 
exhibit them to the chief of police, to determine 
whether they are obscene and immoral, is valid 
and the words "obscene and immoral" fix a suffi- 



cient standard to guide in his determination. Such 
an ordinance prohibiting the exhibition of "mov- 
ing" obscene or immoral pictures does not fur- 
nish a ground for a claim of discrimination be- 
cause it does not include stationary pictures. And 
the fact that the owner is paying rent on the films 
while the Chief of Police is determining whether 
or not they are objectionable under the ordinance, 
such time being no longer than is necessary for 
such inspection, does not constitute a taking of 
property without due process of law. (Block 
v. Chicago, 239 111., 251.) 

The levying of an excise has been practiced :n 
regard to other occupations, and the constitution- 
ality of it has never been doubted. There caft 
therefore, be no objection to it in the present case, 
admitting theatrical entertainments to be merit- 
orious as other occupations. But it seems to be 
peculiarly proper in employments of this kind. 
They require to be watched. Towns are put io 
expense in preserving order, and it is proper they 
should be indemnified for inconveniences or in- 
juries occasioned by employments of this nature. 
(Boston v. Schaffer, 9 Pick. (Mas.) 415.) 

(Ordinances similar to the following state laws, 
are very general throughout the United States.) 

Wearing Hats in Theaters 

(Act 62 of 1896, p. 95.) An act making it a 
misdemeanor for the owner, lessee or manager of 
any theater to permit or suffer any person or per- 
sons "to wear a hat or any kind of head gear, 
opera or evening bonnets excepted," provided the 
same shall not obstruct the view of persons sit- 
ting behind the wearer of the same, (during any 
performance), shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. 
(Constitution and Statutes of Louisiana, 1920, v. 
2. p. 874.) 

Wearing Hats at the "Movies" 

"For the security of the peace, health, order 
and good government," etc., it has been adjudged 
sufficient reason to authorize the enactment of an 
ordinance, making it "the duty of the proprietor, 
lessee, etc., of every opera house, or theater, or 
moving picture show, etc. * * * to require ladies 
who attend performances in such theater or op^ra 
house to remove their hats during the perform- 
ance. "It was claimed that this ordinance was dis- 
criminatory and class legislation in that it did not 
apply to all subjects alike, and if otherwise valid, 
it was wholly unreasonable, because it imposed a 
penalty for an offense over which the defendant 
had no control. The characteer of the amusement 
was a moving picture show. The basis of the 
judgment appears in the language of the court. 
"It is a matter of common knowledge that the 
style of modern hats worns by ladies, if permit- 
ted to be worn by them while the performance is 
in progress, will prevent those who may be us un- 
fortunate as to sit in the rear of ladies from see- 
ing the stage, or from enjoying the spectacular 
entertainment there presented. * * * Xhe spect- 
acular is the principal part of moving picture 
shows. The evil aimed at by this ordinance, the 
mischief it was intended to prevent, and the nui- 
sance it was passed to abate all clearly show that 
the ordinance in question is within the police 
power of the city and is authorized by the "gen- 
eral welfare" clause of its charter." (Oldknow v. 
Atlanta (Ga. App. 1911) 71 S. E. 1015.) 

Regulating Seating of Persons in Theaters 

Any owner, lessee, proprietor, manager of any 
theater, hall,, place, opera house or building where 
theatrical or other performances are given and 
where an admission fee is charged, in any city 
containing a population of 50,000 or over, who 
permits or suffers any person or persons after the 
curtain has arisen on the performance in such 
theater * * * to take seats and disturb the persons 
already seated in said theater * * * shall be guilty 
of a misdemeanor and shall, on conviction, be sub- 
jected to a fine of not more than $25.00 for each 
violation thereof, or imprisonment for not more 
than 30 days, at the discretion of the courts in 
whose jurisdiction the offense was committed, 
(and each violation shall be a separate offense.) 
I Constitution and Statutes of Louisiana, 1920, p. 
875.) 



MARION DAVIES 



The Cosmopolitan Star 
as seen by the 

WORLD'S GREATEST 
ARTISTS 





From the painting by 
Howard Chandler Christy 



From the painting by 
Harrison Fisher 



From the painting by 
Penrhyn Stanlaws 



314 



CITY ORDINANCES 
Akron, O. 

Moving pictures, 1 yr., $40.00. 

Albany, N. Y. 

Theaters. $100,000 for theatrical season; $50. CO 
for 3 months ; $20.00 per week. Left to discre- 
tion of mayor. Moving Picture — Annual $50. 

Section 4. The Mayor, may in his discretion, 
after the notice to the owner or lessee, suspend or 
revoke the license of any theater or place of pub- 
lic amusement where any show, play or exhibition 
is given or is advertised to be given, which, in bis 
opinion, is a lewd or immoral nature. He may &lso 
refuse to license any transient show, exhibition or 
entertainment, or may suspend or revoke the li- 
cense of the same, whenever, in his judgment, 3uch 
show, exhibition or entertainment is of a lewd or 
immoral nature. The mayor may upon like notice 
revoke such license when such place so licensed is, 
in his opinion, and after a report to the Chief of 
the Fire Department to that effect, unsafe for 
the public gathering therein. (Albany : General 
Ordinances 1910, pp. 717-18.) 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Moving picture show, 1 yr., $100,000. Operator, 
original license, including examination fee, 1 yr., 
$5.00; renewal license, $1.00. School for acting, 
1 yr.. $50.00. Supply house, 1 yr., $50.00. 
Atlantic City, N, J. 

Moving-picture operator, 1 yr., $5.00. Moving- 
picture or steropticon, scenic theater, electric 
illusions, or steropticon advertising, except open- 
air shows. 1 yr., $150,000. Same in open air. 1 
yr., $100. Operator annual license, $5.00. 

Auburn, N. Y. 

Theater, 1 jr., $75.00. 

The Common Council has power to prohibit, re- 
strain and regulate all public exhibitions or per- 
formances for money, and to require, fix the 
amount, and to provide for the collection of lic- 
ense fees therefor. (Auburn: Charter, Sec. 30.) 

Augusta, Ga. 

Moving-picture show or electric theater, 1 yr., 
$100.00. Photograph or mutoscope parlor, 1 
month, $5.00. 

Aurora, 111. 

Arcade. 1 yr., $100.00; 6 months, $60.00; 1 
week, $10.00. Theater and moving picture show 
rate based on admission charge 1 yr., $50.00 to 

$100.00. 

Austin, Texas 

Motion-picture exhibition, 1 yr., $12.50. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Theater and moving pictures, 1 yr., $50.00. A 
bill permitting moving picture theaters to open on 
Sunday after 2 p. m., in Baltimore, passed the leg- 
islature and was signed on April 16th, 1920 by 
the Governor. There is a referendum attached to 
the bill, and the citizens of Baltimore may vote 
on it at the next regular election, in November. 
See State Laws : Maryland. 

Belleville, 111. 

Theaters, opera houses, motion picture shows, 
1 day, $5.00. or in lieu of all separate licenses, 
1 yr., $50.00. 

Bellingham, Wash. 

Operator. 1 yr., $5.00; assistant operator, 1 
yr., $2.50; Penny arcade, 1 yr., $50.00. 

Berkeley, Cal. 

Shows, $5.00 a day. Professor T. H. Reed 
wrote a report of a committee appointed by the 
City Club to investigate the motion picture situa- 
tion in Berkeley. This report was published in 
Berkeley Civic Buletin, April 9, 1915. 

Binghamton, N. Y. 

Theater: rate brsed on seating capacity, $50 to 
$150. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Moving pictures; musctorium, theatorium, elec- 
tric theater or penny arcade, rate based on gross 
receipts, 1 yr., $100 to $250. Film exchange, 1 
yr., $50. Moving picture supplies, 1 fr., $25. 

Section 1783. It shall be unlawful for any per- 
son, firm or coporation operating or conducting 
a moving picture show theater or other place of 



amusement in the City of Birmingham to show 
or place on exhibition or allow or permit to oe 
shown or exhibited at such moving picture show 
* * * any film, scene, show or picture rep- 
resents any indecent, obscene,^ lewd, filthy^ vulgar, 
lascivious or suggestive * * picture * 

Section 1785. It shall be unlawful * " to 
show * * * in moving picture show * * * :n 
the City of Birmingham any obscene, filthy, vul- 
gar, profane or suggestive text, legend, phrase or 
verbiage accompanying or describing any moving 
picture film or show. 

Section 1796. Any person, firm or corporation 
violating any provision of this chapter shall, upon 
conviction, be punished within the limits and as 
provided by Section 1216 of the Code of Alabama. 
(Birmingham: Code 1917, pp. 815, 816, 818. 
Boston, Mass. 

Moving picture theaters, 1 yr., $75.00. 

See State Laws, Massachusetts. 

(The censorship bill that was passed by the state 
legislature and later' vetoed by Governor Coobdge, 
was opposed by Mayor Peters of Boston. In his 
opinion the police censorship was adequate. Some 
of the earlier work of the Boston police depart- 
ment may be shown by the following statistics: 
1910, licenses issued, 6080; entertainments ap- 
proved 6067, disapproved 13; 1911, licenses is- 
sued, 6763; approved, 6734; disapproved, 29. 
1912, licenses issued, 7377 ; entertainments ap- 
proved, 7363; disapproved, 14. 1913, licenses is- 
sued, 8316; entertainments approved, 8276; dis- 
approved, 40. 1914, licenses issued, 8551: enter- 
tainments approved, 8525; disapproved, 26.) 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Theater, or exhibition of moving pictures, rate 
based on seating capacity, 1 yr., $50.00 to $150.00. 
Brockton, Mass. 

Moving picture theater, 1 yr., $25.00. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Moving picture operator, original license, 1 yr., 
$5.00. Renewal, 1 yr., $2.00. Theater or moving 
pictures, rate based on seating capacity, 1 yr., 
$50.00 to $100.00. 

All exhibitions of moving pictures known as 
mutoscope, kinetoscope, cinematograph or other 
like automatic or moving picture devices, and all 
penny racades, so-called, or similar entertainments, 
shall belong to and be known as entertainments 
of the sixth class. (Buffalo, Ordinances 1912, 
chap. 34.) 

All licenses shall expire on the 30th day of 
May in each year. (Buffalo, Ordinances 1912, 
chap. 34.) 

Camden, N. J. 

Moving picture show, per seat, 1 yr., 10 cents. 
(None less than $25.00.) 

Charleston, S. C. 

Moving pictures, rate based on admission charge, 
1 yr.. $75.00 to $150.00; operator, 1 yr., $5.00; 
each succeeding year, $1.00. 

Charleston, W. Va. 

Moving picture show or vaudeville, or both, 1 
yr., $125.00; 6 months, $100.00; 3 months, $75.00 ; 
1 week, $20.00. Penny arcade, 1 yr., $50.00; 6 
months, $35.00; 3 months, $25.00. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Motion picture show, illustrated songs, musical 
attractions or vaudeville in connection with each 
stand, 1 yr., $100.00. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Moving picture films, manufacture, sale, or lease 
of 1 yr., $100.00. Moving pictures rate based on 
seating capacity: Admission, 5 cents or less, 1 yr., 
$60.00 to $100.00; admission, 10 cents or more, 
1 yr., $80.00 to $200.00. Showing at nights only, 
one half of above rates. 

Free motion picture entertainment. 

Chillicothe, Mo. 

Moving picture show, 1 yr., $40.00. 

Chicago, 111. 

Motion picture operator, original license, 1 yr., 
$3.00; renewal license. 1 yr., $2.00; apprentice 
license, unlimited. $1.00. Penny arcade, etc., 1 
yr., $200.00. Theater, rate based on admission 
charge, 1 yr., $200.00 to $1000.00. Free munici- 
pal motion picture entertainments have been given. 



315 





PRODUCTIONS 
AFFILIATIONS 



James Oliver Curwood 
Productions 

"Nomads of the North" 
(A First National Attraction) 

"Back to God's Country" 

by James Oliver Curwood 
(A First National Attraction) 

National Film Corporation 

Re- Issues of 
"Tarzan of the Apes" 

and 

"A Romance of Tarzan" 
(First National Attractions) 

Legend Film Productions, Inc. 

New Series of Two- Reel Comedies 



Cathrine Curtis Corporation 

Studios, Los Angeles 

HENRY MacRAE 

Supervising Director 

Dominion Film Company, Inc. 

Production rights to works of Ralph 
Connor and other famous authors 

Winnipeg Productions, Ltd. 

(Winnipeg, Canada i 

"The Foreigner" 
by Ralph Connor 



Northern Pictures Corporation, 
Ltd. 

(Calgary, Canada) 
"Cameron of the Royal Mounted" 
and 

"The Patrol of the Sun Dance Trail" 
by Ralph Connor 



Cable 
"ERNSHIP" 

Phone: Bryant 4730 



6 West 48th Street 



New York City 



316 



Section 1628 and 1629 refer to police permits 
to show pictures, etc., as well as 1627, adopted 
by the Common Council in March, 1916. 

i Motion Picture Department. May, 1920. Un- 
der a proposed ordinance the so-called censorship 
of motion pictures by the police department would 
be abolished, and a motion picture department 
would be established which would censor and 
issue motion picture permits. The department 
would consist of three members, an educator, a 
business man and a woman, appointed by the 
mayor. The jurisdiction of the department would 
include the censorship not only of films, but also 
of posters and advertising matter. Out of 189 
answers to questionnaires sent to school principals 
and teachers, only six were in favor of the pres- 
ent method of police censorship, and 183 were 
against it. The motion picture interests opposed 
the proposed ordinance.) 

Cleveland, O. 

Section 1. That it shall be the duty of the pro- 
prietor, operator or manager of every theater or 
other place of amusement in the city of Cleveland 
open to the public and in which motion pictures 
are produced, to exhibit on a billboard placed in 
front of the building or other structure in which 
such show is given and such motion pictures are 
exhibited the title to the pictures which are being 
shown within, which title shall be full enough to 
describe in general terms the nature and character 
of the picture or pictures to be shown. No such 
proprietor, operator or manager shall place, main- 
tain or allow to be placed or maintained in front 
of or in connection with any such theater or other 
place of public amusement any sign, picture or 
other announcement which in any manner mis- 
states or misrepresents the pictures or other 
amusements which are being shown in said place, 
or which announces a picture or other form of 
amusement or entertainment which is not at the 
time such announcement is displayed being shown 
and exhibited in said theater or other place of 
amusement. 

Section 2. Any person being such proprietor, 
agent or manager of any theater or other place of 
amusement in the city of Cleveland, open to the 
public, failing to comply with the provisions of 
this section shall on conviction thereof be fined 
not less than ten dollars ($10.00) nor more than 
fifty dollars ($50.00) and the costs of the prose- 
cution, and each day that any such theater or other 
place of amusement is operated without the exhi- 
bition of such a statement of the title of the pic- 
tures being shown or that a sign is displayed 
which in any manner misrepresents the amusement 
being offered or announces amusements which are 
not at the time being offered, shall be a separate 
offense. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect and 
be in force from and after the earliest period al- 
lowed by law. (Passed July 15, 1912. Approved 
July 18, 1912.) 

(The state of Ohio has a Board of Censors of 
moving pictures. The city of Cleveland has a 
general ordinance prohibiting objectionable exhibi- 
tions from all shows, without specifically mention- 
ing moving pictures. During the year 1913. Mr. 
Robert (). Bartholomew made a report to Mayor 
Newton D. Baker on the "Censorship of Motion 
Pictures and of Investigation of Motion Picture 
Theaters of Cleveland." There is a branch here of 
the Affiliated Committee for Retter Films of the 
National Board of Review. It is called The Cleve- 
land Cinema Club. It has compiled a list of ac- 
ceptable plays, and is trying to interest schools 
and libraries to advertise their work.) 

Columbia, S. C. 

Moving pictures, 1 vr., $50.00; with vaudeville 

1 yr., $75.00. 

Council Bluffs, Iowa 

Moving picture theater within fire limits. 1 yr., 
$50.00; outside fire limits, $25.00. Additional, 
each seat more than 500 seats. 1 yr.. 5 cents. 

Covington, Ky. 

Moving pictures, admission rharee. 5 cents, 1 
yr.. $100.00; transient, 1 dav, $25.00. 

Dallas, Texas 

Free motion picture entertainment, Moving pic 



ture show. 1 yr.. $65.00; in connection with vaude- 
ville, 1 yr., $75.00; operator, 1 yr., $5.00. 

In August, 1915, the City Council passed an 
ordinance providing for a Board of Censors and a 
Board of Appeals. 

Danville, 111. 

Penny arcades: 1 day, $5.00; one week, $15.00; 
one month, $25.00; one year, $75.00. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Discretion of Mayor. For every kind of exhibi- 
tion, performance or entertainment, not less than 
$1.00 nor more than $500.00 a day. 

Denver, Colo. 

Moving picture operator: Original license, 1 
yr., $3.00; renewal license, 1 yr., $1.50; appren- 
tice license, 1 yr., $.50. Moving picture studio, 
1 yr., $1000.00. Picture film, 1 yr., $40.00 to 
$200.00. 

Des Moines, Iowa 

Moving picture theater or opera house based on 
seating capacity, 1 yr., $75.00 to $100.00. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Moving pictures, 1 yr., $25.00. Free motion 
picture entertainment. 

Section 1. No person or persons, company or 
companies, shall exhibit or maintain in said city 
any circus, menagerie, play, game or theatrical ex- 
hibition, or give any concert, vocal or instrumen- 
tal, or exhibit any natural or artificial curiosity, 
or give a show of any kind for which pay is 
demanded or received, without a license from the 
mayor; and for every license granted shall pay 
the license fee hereinafter specified. * * * 

Section 12. The license fee for roller skating 
rinks, penny exhibits, phonographic exhibits, nov- 
elty theaters, exhibits of moving pictures and all 
shows, exhibits and amusements of a like charac- 
ter, shall be the sum of $50.00 annually, payable 
in advance. * * * 

Section 18. The mayor is hereby authorized to 
issue license to the parties and for the purposes 
aforesaid upon such person, persons, company or 
companies, executing a bond to the city of Detroit, 
in the penal sum of one thousand dollars, with two 
sufficient sureties, conditioned for the faithful ob- 
servance of this ordinance and the charter and 
ordinances of said city. * » * 

Section 20. * * * 

Every person or company operating under this 
ordinance and in whose place of amusement or 
exhibition shall be displayed moving pictures of 
any character, kind or description, shall present 
the pictures, films or plates so sought to be dis- 
played to the Commissioner or Superintendent of 
Police for his inspection. Said Commissioner or 
Superintendent of Police is hereby authorized, and 
it is hereby made his duty to inspect or cause to 
be inspected said pictures, plates or films, and if 
in his judgment they are indecent or immoral, he 
shall reject the same and notify the person or 
company operating the place of amusement or 
exhibition from whom said plates or films were 
received, that the same cannot be used; and the 
person or company using them after they have 
been rejected by the Commissioner or Superintend- 
ent of Police shall be punished as hereinafter pro- 
vided. * * * (Approved, September, 1907.) 

Section 22. Any violation of this ordinance shall 
be cause for revocation of any license issued, and 
shall be punished by a fine not to exceed the sum 
of $200.00, and by imprisonment in the county 
jail or Detroit House of Correction for a period 
not exceeding six months, or either, in the discre- 
tion of the court, and in the imposition of a fine 
only, the court may make a further sentence, that 
the offender be imprisoned until such fine is paid, 
but for a time not exceeding that provided herein. 
(Detroit: Compiled Ordinances, 1912, pp. 500- 
504.) 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Moving picture theater, 1 yr., $50.00. 

Duluth, Minn. 

Moving picture operator, 1 yr., $1.00. Moving 
pictures and playgames concerts, 1 yr., $50.00; 
6 months, $35.00; 1 month, $30.00; 1 day, $5.00. 
East Orange, N. J. 

Moving picture show. 1 yr., $100.00. 



317 



Special RALPH CONNOR Features 



TEe Forcigt 
'The Prospectoi 
^Thc \AmJiom Qergarry 

Camoxonofihe 
%)yal Mounted 

The 3vlajor 
Tie Sky Pilot 

Patrol V *A<? 
Sun Dance Trail 

e /vi$\ii 



Each to be made by separate producing units organized 
for the purpose of specializing on the story in hand. 
In due season each producing unit will make its own 
announcement to the trade. The keen competition be- 
tween them will insure the most artistic film drama. 




6 West 48th Street, New York 



318 



East St. Louis, 111. 

.Moving picture theater, 1 yr., $100.00. 
Easton, Pa. 

Moving picture show, 1 yr., $100.00. 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

Moving picture theater, 1 yr., $48.00. 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Theater, 1 yr., $100.00. 

The mayor of the said city may grant any per- 
son a license * * * upon the payment of the 
following license fees: For every place wholly 
devoted to the purpose of a museum or theatrical 
representations, one hundred dollars per year. 

No license issued hereunder shall permit any 

* * * performance or exercise * * * to be given 
on Sunday, and no such license shall be trans- 
ferred without the written consent of the mayor, 
and may be revoked in his discretion. * * * It 
shall be the duty of the person or persons, corpora- 
tion, partnership or association to whom such li- 
cense is granted to keep all aisles and exits of the 
building in which any exhibition or performance 
is conducted under such license, free and clear of 
persons, chairs or any obstruction while such exhi- 
bition or performance is being conducted therein. 

* * * It shall be the duty of the mayor to pay 
over to the city chamberlain on the first day of 
each month all moneys received for licenses grant- 
ed hereunder, and report to the common council 
at the first stated meeting in the month of Febru- 
ary in each year, the licenses granted during the 
preceding fiscal year and the amounts received 
therefor. A violation of this ordinance shall be 
punished by a fine not exceeding one hundred fifty 
dollars, or by imprisonment not exceeding one 
hundred fifty days or by both such fine and im- 
prisonment, or by a penalty not exceeding $500.00 
to be recovered by the city of Elmira in a civil 
action. (Elmira: Ordinances.) 

Evansville, Ind. 

Theaters where admission fee exceeds one dol- 
lar, per year, $250.00. Theaters where admission 
fee is not less than $.50 nor more than $1.00, per 
yr., $150.00. Theaters where admission fee is not 
more than $.50, per year, $100.00. 

Flint, Mich. 

Theater, opera house, moving picture, etc., rate 
based on seating capacity, 1 yr., $50.00 to $15U00. 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Moving pictures, 1 yr., $50.00; penny arcade, 1 
yr., $50.00; 1 month, $5.00; 1 day, $3.00. Thea- 
ters, 1 yr., $150.00. 

Fort Worth, Tex. 

Motion pictures, 1 yr., $10.00. 

Fresno, Cal. 

Theater, opera, concert or exhibition, 1 yr., 
$100.00; 3 months, $30.00; 1 month, $20.00; 1 

day, $10.00. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Free motion picture entertainment. Motion pic- 
ture show or vaudeville, 1 yr., $150.00; 1 month, 
$15.00. Picture machine, automatic, 1 yr., $3.00; 
operator, 1 yr., original and renewal, $3.00. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Moving picture show, 1 yr., $50.00. Theater, 
opera or concert, 1 yr., $100.00. 

Hartford, Conn. 

Theater, etc., 1 yr., $75.00. 

Haverhill, Mass. 

Moving picture theater, week days, 1 yr., $25.00 ; 
Sunday, 1 day, $7.50. Moving pictures and vaude- 
ville, week days, 1 yr., $50.00; Sunday, 1 day, 

$15.00. 

Hoboken, N. J. 

Moving picture theater, 1 yr., $200.00 ; theater, 
1 yr., $300.00. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Moving picture house, week days, rate based on 
size and admission charge, 1 j r.. $25 00 to $50 00- 
Sunday, 1 day, $2.00. 

Houston, Tex. 

Motion picture show, 1 yr., $12.50. 



Huntington, W. Va. 

Moving picture show, 1 yr., $"5.00. Theater, 
1 yr., $125.00. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Theater, 1 yr., $100.00. Moving picture show or 
airdome, 1 yr., $25.00. Penny arcades, slot ma- 
chines, or exhibiting picture, views of any kind 
for profit, phonograph, graphophone. talking ma- 
chine, kinetoscope, biograph, projectiscope, etc., 
1 yr., $1 for each instrument. Operator of each 
moving picture machine, 1 yr., $5.00. 

Any license that has been issued for a moving 
picture show, skating rink, theater or concert 
hall * * * may be transferred or assigned at any 
time the licensee disposes of his interest in the 
property licensed, subject to the provisions of this 
ordinance. (Indianapolis: Municipal Code, 1917, 
Sec. 756, p. 250.) 

Jackson, Mich. 

Theater or moving picture show rate based on 
seating capacity. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Moving pictures, cinematoscope, phonograph or 
like exhibition, 1 yr., $50.00. Theater, opera 
house or hall used for theatrical purposes, 1 yr., 
$100.00. Free motion picture entertainment. 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Theater, based on seating capacity, 1 yr., $25.00 
to $150.00. 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Moving picture machine, 1 yr., $5.00. Moving 
picture operator, 1 yr., $1.00. Free motion pic- 
ture entertainment. 

Joplin, Mo. 

Photoplay house or airdome, seating capacity of 
1,000, photoplay only, 1 yr., $56.00. Photoplay 
house, theater or airdome, seating capacity of 
1,000, photoplays and vaudeville only, 1 yr., 
$85.00; photoplays, vaudeville and other acts or 
plays, 1 yr., $112.00; photoplays shown not more 
than 180 days, 1 yr., $56.00. Seating capacity 
more than 1000: Photoplays, vaudeville and other 
acts or plays, 1 yr., $170.00; photoplays shown 
not more than 180 days, 1 yr., $56.00. Showing 
advertising matter on screen or stage, one-half of 
above rates additional. 

In 1917 the city code provided in sections 981 
to 994 for censorship giving the chief of police 
usual censor powers. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Moving picture theater, 1 yr., $100.00. Phono- 
graphic or kinetoscope parlors and other mechan- 
ical reproductions of music, pictures or views, 
6 months, $25.00. Theater or theatrical amuse- 
ment place, 1 month, $17.00. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

Moving picture show, rate based on seating ca- 
pacity : admission 5 cents or less, 1 yr., $60.00 to 
$150.00; admission 10 cents or more, 1 yr., $80.00 
to $200.00. Showing at night only, one-half of 
above rates. Theater, 1 yr., $100.00. 

La Crosse, Wis. 

Show or theater, rate based on seating capacity. 
1 yr., $25.00 to $75.00. ' 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Theater and moving picture show, 1 yr., $75.00. 
Transient- moving picture show, lecture, exhibi- 
tion, etc., 1 performance, $5.00. Each additional 
performance, $1.00. 

Lansing, Mich. 

Moving pictures in vaudeville, arcade or audi- 
torium, 1 yr., $25.00; 1 week, $3.00; 1 day, $1.00. 

Lincoln, Neb. 

Moving pictures, 1 yr., $75.00. Theater, 1 yr . 

$100.00. 

Little Rock, Ark. 

Theater or moving picture show rate based on 
admission charge, 1 monuth, $40.00 to $50 00 
Advertising: magic lantern, 1 week, $5.00. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Advertising: Stereopttcon, biograph or moving 
Pictures, etc., 1 month, $5.00. Arcade for phono- 
granh. kinetoscope, microscope, etc., 3 months, 
$50.00. Films, moving picture, selling, exchang- 
ing, rate based on number of reels per month, 3 



319 




Cathnne Curtis Corporation 

ANNOUNCES 

"THE SKY PILOT" 

BY 

RALPH CONNOR 

Direction of 

KING VIDOR 



New York Los Angeles 



320 



months, $10.00 to $50.00. Phonograph, kmeto- 
scope or like machine, operating or exhibiting, 3 
months, $25.00. 

Theater, concert hall or other place of amuse- 
ment, entertainment or exhibition, rate based on 
seating capacity and maximum admission fee, in- 
cluding charge for seat, 1 month, $5.00 to $35.00; 
1 day, $1.00 to $7.50. Free motion picture entir- 
tainment. 

(Los Angeles has an ordinance, JNo. 37,788, 
whose title is as follows : "An ordinance regulat- 
ing public exhibitions of moving and motion pic- 
tures and creating the office of Commissioner ot 
Films." This ordinance was passed December 24. 
1917, and signed by the mayor on the same day. 
On the margin of a printed copy received from 
the city clerk are written the words, "not in 
force.") 

Louisville, Ky. 

The license for each theater, museum, concert 
hall, etc., shall be $250.00 per year. "Where a 
yearly license is paid on any theater, hall, garden 
or other place of public amusement, no special li- 
cense shall be required for entertainments given 
therein." (Louisville: General Ordinances, 1913, 
p. 338.) 

Lynchburg, Va. 

Moving pictures, rate based on seating capacity, 
1 yr., $150.00 to $200.00. Theater, 1 yr., $200.00 

Lynn, Mass. 

Theater, or other amusement places, rate based 
on seating capacity, 1 yr., $50.00 to $100.00. 

Macon, Ga. 

Moving pictures or stereopticon, electric thea- 
ters or similar shows when an admission fee ot 
10 cents or less is charged (no license to be pro- 
rated), 1 yr., $150.00. Same, charging more than 
10 cents admission, regularly or at times (no pro- 
rate), 1 yr., $200.00. Moving pictures, advertising 
on screen other than own business, additional li- 
cense of $25.00, 1 yr. Moving picture machine 
operator each, 1 yr., $3.00. 

Madison, Wis. 

Theater, per seat, 1 yr., 20 cents. 

Maiden, Mass. 

Moving picture house, 1 yr., $5.00. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Moving picture films, manufacture, sale, or lease 
of, 1 yr., $25.00. Moving picture show, rate based 
on seating capacity : Admission 5 cents or less, 
1 yr., $60.00 to $150.00; admission 10 cents or 
more, 1 yr., $80.00 to $200.00. Showing at night 
only, one-half of above rates. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Theater, moving picture theater or show, 1 yr., 
$30.00. All licenses expire on July 1. After 
July 31st, the rate is $2.50 per month. 

Sections 1050-1064 of the Milwaukee code pro- 
vide for strict supervision of billboards by the 
police. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Moving pictures, rate based on seating capac- 
ity, 1 yr„ $75.00 to $150.00. Theaters, 1 yr., 
$150.00. 

Missouri Valley, la. 

Section 1. That the owners, agents or managers 
of any moving picture show, or other exhibitions 
showing pictures, theaters or other entertainments 
charging an admission fee of fifty cents or more 
than twenty-five cents, shall pay a license fee of 
$50.00 per day, $200.00 per week, $400.00 per 
month, $1000.00 per four months, $1500.00 per 
six months, or $2500.00 per year. That the own- 
ers, agents or managers of any such shows, thea- 
ters or other entertainments charging an admis- 
sion fee of twenty-five cents, or more than twenty 
cents, shall pay a license fee of $5.00 per day, 
$15.00 per week, $40.00 per month, $125.00 per 
four months, $150.00 per six months, or $250.00 
per year ; that the owners, agents or managers of 
such shows, exhibitions, theaters or entertainments 
charging an admission fee of not more than twenty 
cents, and more than ten cents, shall pay a license 
fee of $5.00 per day, $15.00 per week, $20.00 per 
month. $75.00 per four months. $lfl0.00 per six 
months, or $150.00 per year, provided, further, that 



nothing in this ordinance shall -be construed as tn 
apply to entertainments given for charitable, re- 
ligious or educational purposes. 

Section 2. That every other exhibition, enter- 
tainment or concert where an admission fee is 
charged, when not otherwise provided, shall pay a 
license fee of $5.00 per day. License fees herein 
prescribed shall be paid in advance. 

Section 3. All ordinances or parts of ordinances 
in conflict with the provisions of this ordinance, 
are hereby repealed. 

Section 4. That this ordinance is deemed of 
immediate importance, shall take effect and be in 
full force from and after its passage and publica 
tion as required by law. 

Adopted and approved, 1920. 

Mobile, Ala. 

Moving picture, phonograph or like exhibition, 
based on seating capacity, $125.00 to $200.00. 
Additional, if displaying advertisements of other 
business, 1 yr., $25.00. Penny arcade, 1 yr.. $60.00. 
Theater rate based on amount of admission charge, 
1 yr., $200.00-$250.00. Additional, each person, 
firm, etc., advertising on curtain, 1 yr.. $25.00. 
Theatrical, musical or similar exhibition. 1 week, 
$25.00. 

Montgomery, Ala. 

Moving picture shows, or electric theaters, where 
admission per person is not more than 10 cents, 
1 yr., $150.00. Where charge is more than 10 
cents and not over 15 cents, 1 yr., $300.00. Where 
charge is 15 cents and not over 25 cents, 1 yr., 
$400.00. Where charge is over 25 cents, 1 yr., 
$400.00. Provided that if any theater desires to 
charge more than license allows, they may increase 
the same for each day for $25.00. Provided tnnt 
no license shall be issued for less than one year. 

Advertising in theaters, etc. Persons, firms or 
corporations contracting for or engaging in the 
business of projecting advertisements by stereopti- 
cons, and the like in theaters, motion picture 
houses, etc., each 1 y r ., $100.00. 

Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Theater or music hall. 1 yr., $50.00. 

The mayor shall have power summarily to re- 
voke the license of any hackman, cartman. or for 
the exhibition of any show. (Mount Vernon : 
Charter, Title 3, Sec. 34.) 

Ordinances : Any person who shall publicly ex- 
hibit any theatrical representations, or other 
shows or exhibitions, or performances in said city, 
without first obtaining a license from the mayor 
therefor, and filing a bond satisfactory to the 
mayor of the city, in the penal sum of two thou- 
sand dollars to guarantee the city against suits 
for damages that might arise by reason of any 
acts of their agents or employees, and furnishing 
satisfactory references from the last town where 
said show was exhibited, shall be punishable by a 
fine of not less than ten dollars nor more than 
fifty dollars or by imprisonment in the county jail 
of Westchester County for not more than fifty 
days, or by both such fine and imprisonment. For 
every license so granted there shall be paid not 
less than ten dollars nor more than one hundred 
dollars at the discretion of the mayor. Provided, 
however, that licenses may be granted without fee 
for any church or school, or for any benevolent, 
charitable or scientific society, or for any local 
charity. This section, however, shall not apply 
to any show, exhibition or performance given in 
a hall, theater or building licensed by the Common 
Council. (Mount Vernon: Ordinances, 1914, p. 
29.) 

Muskogee, Okla. 

Theater, opera house or moving picture show, 
1 yr., $50.00. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Free motion picture entertainment. Motion pic- 
ture films, manufacture, sale or lease of, 1 yr., 
$100.00. Motion picture show rate based on seat- 
ing capacity : Admission, 5 cents or less, 1 jr., 

$60.00 to $150.00; admission 10 cents or more, 1 
yr., $80.00 to $200.00. Showing at night only, 
one-half of above rates. 

New Castle, Pa. 

Moving pictures or theatorium, rale based on 
seating capacity, I yr.. $20.00 to $35.00. With 



321 



HENRY MacRAE 



SUPERVISING DIRECTOR 



Ernest Shipman Affiliated Productions 



Now Producing 

"THE FOREIGNER" 




Personal 

Manager 

Motion 

Picture 

Artists 



Jacobs 'Placed Means Pro- 
ducer Pleased 

Representing Exclusively 

GEORG E'ARCHAI N BAUD 
SYLVIA' B REAMER 
HERBERT RAWLINSON 
GLADYS LESLIE 
GASTON GLASS 
MARTHA MANSFIELD 
HARRY T. MOREY 
JUNE ELVIDGE, Etc., Etc. 




ARTHU'R H.JACOBS 145 br w va N 4 ^ 8 ! t 



vaudeville, 1 yr., $30.00 to $50.00. Theater and 
opera house, 1 yr., $50.00. Theater, vaudeville 
or like performance, 1 yr., $20.00. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Moving picture exhibition, 1 month, $5.00. The- 
ater, 1 day, $1.00. 

New Orleans, La. 

Free motion picture entertainment. Moving pic- 
ture exhibition, etc., rate based on seating capac- 
ity, 1 yr., $50.00 to $400.00. 

New Rochelle, N. Y . 

Theater, 1 yr., $50.00. 

New York City, N. Y. 

Free motion picture entertainments. Motion 
picture theater, 1 yr., $100.00; open air theater 
1 yr.. $50.00. Exhibition: Church or educational 
each one, $2.00. All other exhibitions, each one 
$5.00. 

Over ten years ago there was organized in con 
junction with certain manufacturers and produc 
ers of moving pictures and citizens of New York 
a board of censors, originally called The National 
Board of Censorship of Motion Pictures. The 
name has. since been changed to The National 
Board of Review of Motion Pictures. Acceptance 
of this board's rulinps is obligatory on no one. 

Section 529a. It shall not he lawful for any per- 
son or persons to operate any moving picture 
apparatus and its connections in the City of New 
York unless such person or persons so operating 
such apparatus is duly licensed as hereinafter pro- 
vided. Any person desiring to act as such operator 
shall make application for a license to so act to 
the commissioner of water supply, gas and elec- 
tricity of the City of New York who shall furnish 
to each applicant blank forms of application which 
the applicant shall fill out. 

The commissioner of water supply, gas and elec- 
tricity shall make rules and regulations governing 
the examination of applicants and the issuance of 
licenses and certificates. 

The applicant shall be given a practical exam- 
ination under the direction of the commissioner of 
water supply, gas and electricity, and if found 
competent as to his ability to operate a moving 
picture apparatus and its connections shall receive 
within six days after such examination a license as 
herein provided. Such license may be revoked or 
suspended at any time by the commissioner of 
water supply, gas and electricity. Every license 
shall continue in force for one year from the day 
of issue unless sooner revoked or suspended. Everv 
license, unless revoked or suspended, as herein 
provided, may at the end of one year from date of 
issue thereof be renewed by the commissioner of 
water supply, gas and electricity in his discretion 
upon application and with or without further exam- 
ination as said commissioner may direct. Every 
application for renewal of license must be within 
30 days previous to the expiration of such license. 
Willi every license granted there shall be issued 
to every person obtaining such license a certifi- 
cate, made by the commissioner of water supply, 
gas and electricity or such other officer as such 
commissioner may designate, certifying that the 
person named therein is duly authorized to operate 
moving picture apparatus and its connections. 
Such certificate shall be displayed in a consuicu- 
ous place in the room where the person to whom 
it is issued operates moving picture apparatus and 
its connections. No person shall be eligible to 
procure a license unless he shall be a citizen of 
the United States and of full age. Any person 
offending against the provisions of this section, 
as well as any person who employs or permits a 
person not licensed as herein provided to operate 
a moving picture apparatus and its connections, 
shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon 
conviction thereof shall be punished bv a fine not 
exceeding the sum of $100.00, or imprisonment for 
a period not exceeding three months, or both in 
the discretion of the court. (Laws 1910. Create' 
New > ork Charter, with notes by Mark Ash, New 
^ ork. 1918. pp. 465-466.) 

Section 1482. It shall not be lawful for any 
owner, lessee, manager, agent or officer of any 
theater in the city of New York to admit to any 
theatrical exhibition held in the evening, any minor 



under the age of fourteen years, unless such minor 
is accompanied by, and is in the care of, some 
adult person. Any person violating the provisions 
of this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and shall be liable to a fine of not less than 
$25.00 nor more than $100.00, or imprisonment for 
a term not less than ten nor more than ninety days 
for each offense. All moneys recovered under the 
provisions of this section, for fines, shall be paid 
over to the controller of said city, to be paid into 
the treasury of said city. (Greater New York 
Charter, 1918, p. 1152.) 

Norfolk, Va. 

Moving pictures, rate based on seating capacity 
..i place t-ntertainment, 1 yr., $100.00 to $200.00. 
Using phonograph or other noise producing in- 
struments to advertise, each place of entertain- 
ment, 1 yr.. $300.00. Penny arcade and automatic 
theater, 1 yr., $100.00. Theater, etc., rate based 
on admission charge, 1 yr., $200.00-$350.00. No 
admission charge, 1 yr., $500.00. Theatrical or 
like exhibition, 1 yr., $20.00. 

Norristown, Pa. 

Penny arcade, Edisonian or other similar amuse- 
ments. 1 yr.. $25.00. Theater or moving picture, 
rate based on seating capacity, 1 yr., $75.00 to 
$150.00. 

Oakland, Cal. 

Phonograph or kinetoscope parlor, 3 months, 
$5.00. Motion picture theater. Free, 1 year, 
$75.00; 3 months, $20.00. Where admission is 
charged rate based on seating capacity, 3 months, 
$12.50 to $25.00. 

Ogden, Utah 

Moving picture theater, 1 yr., $50.00. Theater, 
rate based on seating capacity, 1 yr., $75.00 to 
$125.00. 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Moving picture operator, 1 yr., $1.00. Theater, 

rate based on seating capacity, 1 yr., $75.00 lo 
$200.00. 

Omaha, Neb. 

Moving pictures, seating capacity 350 or less, 1 
yr., $35.00; seating capacity over 350, each seat, 
1 yr., 10 cents. Special license, 10 days, $25.00. 

Passaic, N. J. 

Moving picture, 1 yr., $100.00. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Motion picture operator, original license, 1 yr., 
$5.00; renewal license, $1.00. 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

Moving picture machine operator, 1 yr., $1.00. 

Peoria, 111. 

Moving pictures, rate based on seating capac- 
ity, 1 yr., $100.00 to $200.00. One day, $5.00. 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Theater, opera house or moving picture show, 
rate based on seating capacity, 1 yr., $50.00 to 
$200.00. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Motion picture house, 1 yr., $100.00; operator, 
1 yr., $5.00. See State Laws, Pennsylvania. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Moving picture show, theater, nickelodeon and 
similar places, rate based on seating capacity and 
admission charge, 1 month, $10.00 to $50.00. Free 
motion picture entertainments. 

Portland, Ore. 

Theater, 1 yr., $5.00; two and one-half cents 
additional for each seat. 

On May 1, 1918, a censor bill was passed by 
the Council but this was disputed in the courts 
and was amended March 10, 1920. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Moving pictures, admission 5 cents or 10 cents 
respectively, 1 yr., $75.00-$100.00 ; three months, 
$20.00 $27.50; over 10 cents. 1 yr., $250.00. 

Providence, R. I. 

Moving picture machine operator, 1 yr., $1.00. 

Pueblo, Col. 

Picture show, 1 yr., $60.00. Theater, 1 yr.. 

$150.00. 

Quincy, 111. 

Moving picture show, rate based on admission 



323 



Broadwell Productions, Inc 



(in nou nee 



The Production of Fifteen Two Reel Feature 
Detective Dramas from the Famous 
Original Nick Carter Stories 
for the Season 1920-1921 



Starring 

THOMAS J. CARRIGAN as NICK CARTER 

• with 

MAE GASTON as "PATSY" 
COLIN CHASE as "CHICK" 



ROBERT BURKE BROADWELL 

President and Director General 

JOHN J. GLAVEY, Representative 



SUITE No. 1115, BROKAW BLDG., 1457 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Los Angeles, Cal. Boston, Mass. New York, -N. Y. 



324 



charge, 1 yr., $50.00 to $100.00. Theater or opera 
house. 1 yr., $150.00. 

Quincy, Mass. 

.Moving picture house, 1 yr., $15.00 to $25.00. 

Racine, Wis. 

Free motion picture entertainment. 

Reading, Pa. 

Moving-picture show. 1 yr., $50.00. 

Richmond, Va. 

.Moving pictures, based on admission fee, 1 yr., 
$75.00 to $200.00. 

Roanoke, Va. 

.Moving pictures, rate based on admission charge, 
1 yr., $75.00 to $250.00; 1 month, $15.00 to 
$50.00; 1 week, $50.00 to $20.00; 1 day, $1.00 to 
$4.00. With piano, phonograph, or like instru- 
ment on street, 1 yr.. $112.50 to $375.00; 1 
month. $22.50 to $75.00; 1 week $5.00 to $20.00; 
1 day. $1.50 to $6.00. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Moving picture show, 1 yr., $50.00. Moving 
picture operator, 1 yr., $2.00. 

A license is required for showmen, which, ac- 
cording to ordinance is "construed to cover the 
exhibition of any circus, theatrical representation 
or public show of any kind, or permitting any 
place to be used for such purposes." Licenses 
are issued by the mayor for auctioneers, bill 
posters, hackinen, cartmen, junk delears. lunch 
wagon men, pawnbrokers, peddlers and showmen. 
( Rochester : Municipal Code, 1907, v. 2, p. 
88, 91.) 

Rockford, 111. 

Moving pictures. 1 yr., $100.00. 

Sacramento, Cal. 

Motion picture, 3 months. $30.00. 

St. Joseph, Mo. 

Moving picture theater, rate based on admis- 
sion charge, 1 yr., $25.00 to $50.00. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

In addition to all other requirements of this 
article, the applicant or applicants for said license 
shall furnish to the license collector a petition 
signed by a -majority of the property owners of 
the block wherein said business is to be carried 
on and also a majority of the property owners of 
the portion of the block opposite said place of 
business, requesting the issuance of the said 
license, and declaring that the maintenance of 
said pawn shop, intelligence office, museum, junk 
shop, auction place, show, theater or exhibition 
of whatsoever kind, is not a nuisance or source 
of annoyance to said property owners. (Approved 
June 13, 1912.) 

A number of city ordinances are in effect in 
St. Louis regarding handling, storing and showing 
film. 

A bill was introduced in the Council by Mr. 
Fletcher, October, 1913, "prohibiting the exhibi- 
tion of obscene and immoral pictures * * * an( j 
providing a penalty for the violation thereof." 
This bill was printed as "Council Bill No. 25 5" 
(St. Louis, 1913), with a report by the Municipal 
Reference Librarian on "Censorship of Motion 
Picture Films with data from 10 cities. This 
bill did not pass. In 1915 an attempt was made 
to create a board of censors. 

Municipal Motion Pictures in St. Louis 

In a pamphlet issued five or six years ago by 
the National Hoard of Censorship of Motion Pic- 
tures, this body declares that "it is certainly true 
that unaccompanied children should not go to any 
and all motion picture theaters," but it deplores 
that "the American city provides for its children 
no alternative to the motion picture theater ex- 
cept the street." 

This was a condition that the Division of Parks 
and Recreation of the Department of Public Wel- 
fare recognized, and sought to remedy. The 
ordinance of July 10, 1914, was amended (sec, 
St. Louis : Ordinances) and appropriations made 
tor free movies. This ordinance is still a part 
of the Code. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

["heater. Rate based on seating capacity, 1 yr., 
$201.00 to $301.00; 3 months. $76.00 to $101. 0C : 



1 month, $41.00 to $51.00; 1 day, $5.00. 

In 1915, the City Council passed a number of 
local laws governing the showing of pictures. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Moving picture theater, 1 yr., $50.00. Moving 
picture and vaudeville, 1 yr.. $75.00. 

San Antonio, Tex. 

Moving picture show, 1 yr., $12.50. 

San Diego, Cal. 

Free motion picture entertainment. Penny 
Arcade. 1 month, $5.00. Stereopticon advertising 
outside, 1 month, $5.00. 

San Jose, Cal. 

Theater, 1 yr.. $200.00. 

Savannah, Ga. 

Moving picture or electrical theater. 1 yr., 
$225.00. 

Schenectady, N. Y. 

Advertising. 1 yr., $5.00. Theater, seating 
capacity up to 500. 1 yr.. $60.00. Additional for 
each 100 seats. 100 seats or fraction thereof over 
500. 1 yr., $60.00. 

The mayor, may in his discretion, after notice to 
the owner or lessee, suspend or revoke the lic- 
ense of any theater or place of public amusement 
where any show, play or exhibition is given, or is 
advertised to be given which, in his opinion, is 
of a lewd or immoral nature. (Schenectady: 
General Ordinances, 1909. p. 91.) 

Seattle, Wash. 

Moving pictures, museums, etc.. rate based on 
admission charge. 1 week, $7.50 to $15.00. The- 
ater, continuous performance, vaudeville and pic- 
ture show, 1 yr.. $125.00 to $250.00. 

Shreveport, La. 

Moving picture exhibition, etc., rate based en 
seating capacity, 1 yr.. $75.00 to $100.00. 

South Bend, Ind. 

Theater, including moving picture rate based 
on seating capacity, 1 yr., $30.00 to $100.00. 

Spokane, Wash. 

Penny arcade, 1 yr.. $40.00; phonograph, cin- 
eograph, kinetoscope. etc., charging 25 cents or 
less, 1 yr„ $200.00. 

Springfield, 111. 

The amount of some amusement and entertain- 
ment licenses is left to the discretion of the mayor. 
Theater, admission 5 cents, 1 yr.. $50.00; admis- 
sion 10 cents, 1 yr., $100.00. 

Springfield, Mo. 

Moving picture show rate based on admission 
charge. 1 yr., $50.00 to $75.00; outdoor enter- 
tainment, 1 month. $10.00. 

Stamford, Conn. 

Theater, 1 yr., $75.00. 

Stockton, Cal. 

Theater. 1 yr., $50.00: 6 months. $30.00; 1 
month. $20.00; 1 day, $5.00. 

Superior, Wis. 

Moving pictures, 1 yr., $125.00. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Moving picture show, class, 1, 1 yr., $50.00; 

class 2. 1 yr., $100.00. 

The license shall specify the object and length 
of time for which it has been granted. It shall 
be the duty of the person or corporation so lic- 
ensed to keep good order in and about his place 
of exhibition or amusement, and for that purpose 
to keep, at his own expense, a sufficient police 
force. (Syracuse: General ordinances. 1915. np 
34-5.) ' " 

Tacoma, Wash. 

Advertising, stereopticon, moving pictures, etc., 
1 yr.. $50.00. Moving picture house, suburban, 
not operating over 40 hours per week, 1 yr.. 
$50.00. Theater, rate based on admission charge. 
1 yr.. $75.00 to $100.00; additional it moving 
pictures are shown. 1 yr., $50.00. Vaudeville and 
moving picture house, rate based on seating 
capacity, 1 yr., $75.00 to $200.00. 

Tampa, Fla. 

Moving picture show. 1 yr., $100.00 

Terre Haute, Ind. 

Moving picture theater. 1 yr., $75.00. 



325 




r 



THOMAS J. CARRIGAN 

Starring in "Nick Carter" 



'CHECKERS" 



'THE TRUTH" 



"THE TIGER'S CUB- 




COLIN CHASE 

America s Leading Juvenile 
Portraying "Chick" 
in the Famous Nick Carter Series 




HARRY G. KEENAN 

"Master Villain" 
in the Famous Nick Carter Series 



326 



Toledo. Ohio 

Theaters and places of amusement licensed ac- 
cording to seating capacity, one yr., $25-$200. 
See "Motion Pictures in Toledo." Toledo, 1919. 

Topeka, Kan. 

Free motion picture entertainment. Moving 
pictures and opera based on seating capacity, 1 
yr., $35.00 to $50.00. Arcade, 1 yr., $50.00. 
Troy, N. Y. 

Theater and moving picture exhibitions, 1 yr., 
$50.00. 

The common council shall have power to enact, 
.amend, revise and repeal ordinances for said city, 
* * * for the following purposes to wit : In rela- 
tion to places of public amusements, and to license, 
regulate or prohibit theatrical, opera, circus, con- 
cert, pugilistic and other exhibitions, performances, 
plays and shows. (Troy: Charter, Title III.) 

Tulsa, Okla. 

Theater, moving picture or vaudeville, rate 

■based on seating capacity, 1 yr., $100.00 to 

$250.00. 

Utica, N. Y. 

Theater, based on seating capacity, 1 yr., 
$25.00 to $75.00. 

Waltham, Mass. 

Theater, concert hall, or similar amusement 
place, 1 yr., $25.00. 

Waterbury, Conn. 

Free motion picture entertainment. 

West Hoboken, N. J. 

Theater, including moving picture, 1 yr., 

$100.00. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Theater, opera house, moving picture shows, or 
nickelodeon, 1 yr., $100.00; 6 months, $130.00; 
1 week, $20.00. 

Wichita, Kans. 

Moving picture show, 6 months, $25.00. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Arcade, 1 yr., $50.00. Moving picture operator, 
3 yr., $0.25. Theater and moving pictures, rate 
liased on seating capacity, 1 yr., $50.00 to $100.00. 

Williamsport, Pa. 

Moving-picture exhibition, 1 yr., $100.00. 

Wilmington, Del. 

Moving-picture show. 1 yr., $100.00. With 
spoken drama, 1 yr., $125.00. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Theater, vaudeville and moving pictures, 1 yr., 
$100.00. 

Woonsocket, R. I. 

Moving picture exhibition. 1 exhibition, $1.00. 

CANADA 

Alberta 

The Lieut Governor-in-Council appoints either 
a Censor or a Board of Censors of not more than 
three persons with power to permit, prohibit or 
reject the exhibition of any or all films proposed 
to be used in the Province and to suspend for 
cause trie license of any operator or other lic- 
ensee. Attendance of minors is no't restricted by 
the Act. (The Theaters Act.) 

British Columbia 

The Lieut-Governor-in-Council appoints a Cen- 
sor with power to permit, prohibit or reject the 
exhibition of films or slides in British Columbia. 
A child 14 years old must be accompanied by an 
adult. This does not apply between the houts 
of 3.30 p. m. and 6 p. m., on days upon which 
public schools are open or before 6 p. m., in the 
afternoon or any other day. The Lieut-Governor- 
in- Council appoints examiners to examine and 
certify the competency of persons who apply for 
a license to act as operators, etc. (The Mov- 
ing Pictures Act.) 

Manitoba 

The LieutGovemor-in-Council appoints censors; 
three or more persons with power to permit or 
prohibit or reject all films or slides. 

New Brunswick 

The Lieut-Governor-in-Council aopoints a Board 
•of Censors of 4 persons with power to permit, 



nrohibit or reject the exhibition of all . films or 
slides in the Province and to suspend >or cause 
he license of any operator Children under the 
aee of fifteen years are not permitted to ateud 
where admission fee is charged. (Theaters and 
Cinematographs Act.) 

Nova Scotia 

The Lieut-Governor-in-Council appoints one or 
more persons to be the Nova .Scotia Board of 
Censors with power to permit or prohibit the use 
or exhibition in Nova Scot.a for public enter- 
tainment of any films. (The Theaters and Cin- 
ematographs Act.) Attendance of minors is not 
restricted by the Act. 

Ontario 

The Lieut-Governor-in-Council appoints a Board 
of Censors with power to permit or prohibit the 
exhibition of any film or slide in any theater in 
Ontario -V child under the age of fifteen years 
unaccompanied by an adult is not permitted to 
attend moving picture shows where an admission 
fee is charged, except on Saturdays and public 
or legal holidays between the hours of 9 a. m 
and 6 p. m. During these hours a matron paid 
by the exhibitor is to be engaged in each theater 
with duties to supervise the conduct of the chil- 
dren and of the adults toward them. (The the- 
aters and Cinematographs Act.) 

Quebec 

The Lieut-Governor-in General appoints a com- 
mission called "The Board of Censors of Moving 
Pictures" composed of three ( ommisstoners and 
a secretary. It is stipulated that the members 
of the commission shall have no interest m the 
moving picture business. The commission has 
power to permit or refuse the showing of hims 
in the Province of Quebec. A child less than 
sixteen years of age is not permitted to attend 
moving 'picture shows unless accompanied by 
father, mother, tutor or teacher or a guardian 
specially authorized by the father or mother, ex- 
cept when the advertisement of the exhibition an_ 
nounces a programme only of pictures authorized 
for children bv the Board of Censors. (An Act 
Respecting Exhibitions of Moving Pictures.) 

Saskatchewan 

The Lieut-Governor-in-Gouncil appoints either 
a Censor or a Board of Censors with power to 
permit, prohibit or reject the exhibition of all 
films or slides in the Province and to suspend for 
cause the license of any operator. Children under 
the age of fourteen are not permitted to attend 
after eight o'clock p. m., unless accompanied by 
a parent or responsible person. (The Theaters 
and Cinematograph Act.) 

Montreal, Que. 

Section 300. And the city council, for the pur- 
poses and objects included in the foregoing article, 
but without limitation of its powders and authority 
thereunder, as well as for the purposes and ob- 
jects detailed in the present article shall have 
authority: * * * To license, regulate or prohibit 
the exhibitions of showmen and shows of all 
kinds, and the exhibitions of caravans, inena~enes, 
circuses, concert-halls, dance-halls, theatrical per- 
formances, skating rinks and all places of amuse- 
ment and museums. (3 Edw. VTI. c. 62, art. 22, 
1903. Montreal, Charter and Amendments, 1908, 
pp 92, 96.) This general law authorizes each city 
to make its own by-laws for the regulation of all 
places of amusement. (Montreal: By-laws.) 

WHERE MINORS ARE PRO- 
HIBITED 

Th figures immediately after the name of the 
city or state in the following table indicate tic 
age limit, under which minors may not be seen 
in public places, or attend moving picture shows, 
unless accompanied by their parents or guardian, 
after certain hours of the day or night : 

Bangor. Me., 16 

Chelsea, Mass., 16 

Cheyenne, Wyo., 16 

Colorado Springs, Colo,, 15 

Connecticut. 14 

Decatur. 111., 16 

Denver, Colo., 15 



327 



MAE GASTON 

As "PATSY" 

In the Famous 

"Nick Carter Series" 



BROADWELL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



328 



Des Moines. Ia., 15 
Detroit. Mich., 14 
East St. Louis, III., H> 
Evansville, lnd., 15 
Fresno, Cal., 12 
Grand Rapids, Mich., 16 
Hannibal, Mo.. 16 
Hawaii, 15 

Hot Springs, Ark.. 16 
Kansas City, Mo.. 15 
Kenyon, Minn.. 16 
i ars.ng. Mich.. Id 
Lexington, Ky., 15 
Madison. Wis., 16 
Massachusetts, 13 
Middletown.N. Y„ 16 
.. inneapolis. Minn.. 16 
New Hampshire. 1 4 
New York (City). 14 
New York (State). 16 
New Jersey, 16 
Oakland. Cal.. 16 
OgdenCity. Utah. 16 
Parsons, Kans., 16 
I'asadena. Cal.. 17 
Platteville. Wis.. 16 
Portland, Ore.. 15 
Ouincy, 111., 16 
Riverside. Cal., 16 
Rockford, 111.. 16 
St. loseph. Mo., 15 
St. Paul, Minn.. 16 
Springfield, Mass.. 16 
Topeka, Kans., 16 
Utah, 14 

\ irg.nia. Minn.. 1 (• 



IMPORTANT LEGAL DECI- 
SIONS 

(Courtesy of O'Brien. Malevinsky & 
Driscoll.) 

Powers of the Commissioner of Licenses 

For instance, the right and authority of the 
Commissioner of Licenses of the City of New 
Yory to prevent the showing of a picture which 
he honestly believes to he injurious to the morals 
of the people by closing the theater through tak 
ing away its license, has been clearly and un- 
equivocally set forth by the F'ederal Courts in 
like manner as has been previously done by the 
State courts. 

"Fit to Win" was a film made under govern- 
ment supervision, intended for the army camps, 
to show to the young men in army life the dread- 
ful effects of venereal diseases. Certain exhib- 
itors secured the film, made some changes, and 
proceeded to arrange for its distribution and ex- 
hibition to the public generally throughout 'lie 
country. 

There can be no argument on the proposition 
that the film was useful propaganda in the fight 
against a serious and apparently ever-increasing 
scourge. But there was room for argument as 
to whether or not the film should be shown to 
mixed audiences. 

The film was booked to play the Grand Opera 
( 1 1 1 ti M- in Brooklyn. It had already opened there 
when the Commissioner of Licenses issued notice 
that he would close the theater by revoking its 
license if the showing of the film was not im- 
mediately discontinued. 

The owners of the film then sought the aid 
of the Federal court to prevent the Commissioner 
of Licenses from interfering with their business. 
The Federal District Court for the Southern Dis- 
trict of New York, issued an injunction against 
the Commissioner of Licenses. 

An appeal was taken to the Circuit Court of 
Appeals, which reversed the lower court and 
upheld the right of the Commissioner of Licenses 
to revoke the license of the theater. The court 
said that the Commissioner of Licenses should 
not be interfered with so long as he should 
"exercise his discretion fairly, honestly and upon 
correct information, and with a view to the moral 
and physical welfare of the public " 



"The fair and honest judgment of the ofii- 
cial primarily charged with the duty of de- 
ciding should not be interefered with by the 
courts." (Silverman vs. Gilchrist, 260 Fed.. 
564). . . . 

In other words, the Commissioner of Licenses 
any question as to the propriety of showing the 
what he considers to be indecent or objectionable 
films within the City of New York. If there is 
any question as to the propriety of showing the 
film, the opinion of the Commissioner of Licenses 
will govern, if it is honest and fair and founded 
upon correct information and with a view to the 
welfare of the public. 

The power of the Commissioner of Licenses was 
again upheld in the German opera case (Star 
Opera Company vs. Hylan. 178 NT. Y., Supp.. 
179). After an attempt was made to revive Ger- 
man opera at the Lexington Opera House, result- 
ing in near-riots because of the opposition of 
members of the American Legion and others, the 
Mayor of the City of New York issued an order 
that Cerman opera should not be produced in the 
City of New York, until after the formal declara- 
tion of peace. Defiance of this order meant re- 
vocation of the license of the theater by the Com- 
missioner of Licenses, an appointee of the Mayor. 

The producers of the opera sought to enjoin 
the Mayor, but without success. The Supreme 
Court of New York refused to grant an injunc- 
tion that wVuld prevent the Commissioner of Lie 
enses from acting, and the opera was finally 
w ithdrawn. 

In this connection the case of Goldwyn Dis- 
tributing Corp.. (108 Atlantic Reporter. 816), is 
interesting. The Goldwyn Distributing Corp. was 
about to release "The Brand," in the State of 
Pennsylvania. In accordance with the laws of 
that State, the picture was submitted to the State 
Board of Consors. The State Board of Censors 
disapproved of it as likely to "debase or corrupt 
the morals." The corporation appealed to tiie 
Common Pleas Court of Philadelphia. That court 
reversed the Board of Censors. The Board of 
Censors then appealed to the Supreme Court of 
the State of Pennsylvania, which reversed the 
Court of Common Pleas and upheld the decision 
of the Board of Censors. The Supreme Court 
held that the only question the Court could pass 
upon on appeal was whether or not the action 
of the Hoard of Censors was an abuse of the dis- 
cretion imposed in the Board. In other words, 
if the Board acts impartially and honestly, its 
decision will be upheld. 

Showing of a Person's Picture Without 
Permission 

There have been two important decisions in 
recent months bearing upon the question of the 
use of the picture of a person without the per- 
son's permission. 

The Civil Rights Law prohibits the use of a 
person's name or picture without his written con- 
sent "for advertising purposes or for the purpose 
of trade." 

Grace Humiston. a New York lawyer, who 
had acquired considerable notoriety in connection 
with the finding of the body of a young girl who 
had been murdered, began an action against the 
Universal Film Manufacturing Company and the 
Universal Film Exchange of New York, Inc. 
This case involved a novel point, differing from 
the famous Jack Binns case, namely, whether or 
not a person's picture and name could be used 
in a picture of current events. 

Mrs. Humiston complained, first, that her name 
and picture were used in "Universal Animated 
Weekly" and "Universal Current Events." issued 
by defendants, and, second, that her name and 
picture were used on posters advertising those 
films. 

She recovered a judgment, with an injunction, 
in the trial court. An appeal was taken to the 
Appellate Division of the Supreme (Hurt. 
The court said (189, App. Div., 467) : 

"There is a clear distinction between a 
news reel and a motion picture photoplay. A 
photoplay is inherently a work of fiction. A 
news reel contains no fiction, but shows only 
actual photographs of current events of pub- 



329 



CHARLES T. DAZEY 



Author or Co- Author 
of the Following Plays 

"In Old Kentucky" The play that holds the world's record of 27 
consecutive seasons on the stage. Of this play Henry A. Clapp, the dean of 
Boston critics, said: "It is one Shakespeare might have seen with pleasure." 
Produced by Louis A »B. Mayer, directed by Marshall Neilan and starring 
Anita Stewart. 

THE SUBURBAN Produced by JacobLitt 

THE WAR OF WEALTH Produced by Jacob Lilt 

HOME FOLKS ' Produced by Jacob Brooks 

AN AMERICAN KING Star, James O'Neill 

THE LITTLE MAVERICK Star. Maggie Mitchell 

THE STRANGER Star, Wilton Lackaye 

THE CAPTAIN Star, Nat Goodwin 

AN AMERICAN LORD Star, Wm. H. Crane 

A NIGHT OUT Star, Miss May Robson 

THE SIGN OF THE ROSE Star, George Beban 

A\uthpr or Co- Author of 
the Following Screen Plays 



MANHATTAN MADNESS Douglas Fairbanks 

WOLF LOWRY Wm. S. Hart 

THE MYSTERIOUS CLIENT Mrs. Vernon Castle 

NEW YORK LUCK William Russell 

THE SEA MASTER William Russell 

THE MIDNIGHT TRAIL William Russell 

BEHIND THE MASK Catherine Calvert 

SHIFTING SANDS Gloria Swanson 

THE TESTING OF MILDRED VANE May Allison 

HER COUNTRY'S CALL Mary Miles Minter 

PEGGY LEADS THE WAY Mary Miles Minter 

THE PRINCE OF AVENUE A James Corbett 



THE ISLE OF JEWELS (SERIAL) TO BE RELEASED BY PATHE 
Recent Release: "THE SILENT BARRIER" 
In Production: "WOMEN MEN LOVE" 



Permanent Address LAMBS CLUB New York City 



330 



lie interest. The news reel is taken on the 
spot, at the very moment of the occurrence 
depicted, and is an actual photograph of the 
event itself. The photoplay, as the result of 
fiction, retains its interest irrespective of the . 
length of time which has elapsed since its 
first production ; whereas, a news reel, to be 
of any value in large cities, must he pub- 
lished almost simultaneously with the occur- 
ence of the events which it portrays. This 
news service, as far as it goes, is a truth- 
ful, accurate purveyor of news, quite is 
strictly so as a newspaper. While a news- 
paper account conveys the news almost en- 
tirely by words, the news service conveys the 
same by photographs, with incidental verbal 
explanation." 
Justice Smith, writing for the court, said that 
he could see no practical difference between the 
presentation of current events in a motion picture 
film and in a^newspaper, and that the Civil Rights 
baw did not prevent the showing of such pic- 
tures any more than it attempted to prevent the 
publication of a newspaper. 

The court went further and held that the ex- 
hibitor could use the posters in question, with 
the name and picture of the person, to advertise 
the film. The holding of the lower court was 
reversed and Mrs. Humiston was not allowed to 
recover. 

In another recent case decided by the same 
court — the Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court, First Department — the court held that a 
woman was entitled to recover under the Civil 
Kights Law, because without her consent there 
was exhibited a motion picture of a Caesarian 
operation undergone by her, holding that it was 
the use of a persons picture for purposes of trade 
without the person's consent. In that case the 
picture did not come under the classification of 
"current events." but was made part of a film, 
called "Birth." 

"Peg of My Heart" Litigation 

The litigation growing out of the motion pic- 
ture rights of the play, "Peg of My Heart," holds 
much of interest to motion picture producers 
and the motion picture public. 

J. Hartley Manners was the author of this rec- 
ord-breaking comedy. In 1912, he made a contract 
with Oliver Morosco, giving to Morosco the pio- 
dUcing rights. Nothing whatever was said about 
the motion picture rights. 

In 1918, there began a series of litigation in 
regard to the motion picture rights. First, Man- 
ners, in the Federal court, sought to restrain 
Morosco from making a picture of the play, bas- 
ing his suit on the contention that the contract 
did not carry with it the motion picture rights 
Manners' bill was dismissed (254 Fed., 737). The 
court, in passing upon the case, interpreted the 
contract as meaning that Morosco should have all 
producing rights, including the motion picture 
rights. In the wording of the contract Manners 
granted to Morosco "the sole and exclusive license 
and liberty to produce, perform and represent the 
said play." 

-Manners took an appeal to the Circuit Court, 
which affirmed the judgment of the district court 
(258 Fed., 557). 

Manners then carried the matter to the United 
States Supreme Court. 

Iinmediately after the decision in his favor in' 
the District Court. Morosco had made a contract 
with the Famous Players-Lasky Corp., to make a 
motion picture of the play. This picture was 
made and about to be released prior tb a decision 
being had from the United States Supreme Court 
on the prior litigation. Manners began another 
action, this time against the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corporation, and there contended, among 

\ er A gS ' tl,at " ,c P r< > v 'sion in his contract 
with Morosco, reading, "No alterations, elimina- 
tions or additions to be made in the play without 
the approval of the author," would prevent the 
release of the motion picture made by Famous 
i'layers-Lasky Corporation. 

This case was heard by Judge Mayer of the 
Uistrict (ourt for the Southern District of N-w 
l ork. His amnion was written prior to the deci- 
sion of the United States Supreme Court in the 



involved in all of them is practically the same. 
Manners vs. Morosco litigation. Judge Mayer's 
decision is particularly interesting in that it holds 
that such a clause in a contract would not ab- 
solutely prevent the adaptation of a play to 
motion pictures, but would prevent any material 
digression from the story or sequence of the play. 
"It is obvious that a spoken play cannot 
be literally reproduced on the screen. The 
screen must convey by pantomimic actions 
and legends or concise statements, whether 
by way of narrative or dialogue, the subject 
matter and action of the play. Therefore, an 
alteration, elimination or addition which is 
faithfully consistent with the plan and sequence 
of the play cannot be held to be an alteration, 
elimination or addition prohibited under the 
seventh paragraph without the consent of the 
author. On the other hand, the author and 
playwright, by virtue of the contract ex- 
pressed in the seventh paragraph, is entitled 
to the exercise of the veto by that paragraph 
secured in respect of any part of the motion 
picture which constitutes, within the intent 
of the parties, an alteration, elimination or 
addition." 

Justice Mayer granted to Manners a decree 
restraining the production of the motion picture 
made by the Famous Players-Lasky Corp., hold- 
ing that the film departed materially from the 
play that Manners had an absolute right to veto 
such changes. 

Shortly thereafter the United States Supreme 
Court made its decision (U. S. Adv., Ops.. 1919- 
20. page 390). It will be remembered that the 
question before the United States Supreme Court 
was whether the contract between Manners and 
Morosco gave Morosco the motion picture rights 
of ''Peg of My Heart." or whether Manners had 
reserved those rights to himself. 

The court, interpreting the contract, held '-hat 
"the sole and exclusive license and liberty to 
produce, perform and represent" the play did riot 
carry or include the right to make a motion pic- 
ture of the play. The decision of the lower courts 
was reversed, and an injunction was granted to 
Manners against the production of the play in 
motion pictures by Morosco, but conditioned, 
however, upon Manners' not producing the play 
in motion pictures while the contract with Moros- 
co for its stage production was still in force. In 
other words, the court held that while Manners 
did not transfer the motion picture rights to Mo- 
rosco, he had no right to interfere with what he 
did. give to Morosco, namely, the stage produc- 
tion, by a production in motion pictures. 

The motion picture of the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corp., then becomes useless unless the 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp. makes its peace 
with Manners. 

Responsibility of Theater Owner 

The responsibility of the theater manager to use 
reasonable care in seeing to it that his theater is 
a safe place for his patrons to frequent and that 
there are no unseen dangers or traps that will 
cause anyone bodily injury, has been emphasized 
by several cases during the year. 

In one case tried in California, an accident was 
due to an electric fan becoming detached from 
the governing motor. The fan fell and struck the 
patron on the head. The court held that the 
mere fact of the accident raised a presumption of 
negligence, or in other words, the court applied 
the rule of resipsa loquitur (Ham vs. Tallv, 181, 
Cal. 81). 

In the case of Adams vs. Schneider, 124 N. 
E., 718, the court expressly held that one own- 
ing or controlling a place of public entertainment 
must know that the place is safe for public use, 
and use care and diligence to keep it safe, and 
that want of knowledge of conditions which, by 
reasonable care, the owner might have discovered, 
will not prevent liability on his part. The court 
also said that one attending and paying for admis- 
sion to a theater has a right to assume that the 
place is safe and need not inspect the surround- 
ings to determine whether it is safe. 

Several other cases brought to recover for per- 
sonal injuries suffered on theater property were 
decided during the year, but the principle of law 



331 



L . 


J . G A S N I E R 




After some years in general supervision 




and executive management 




NOW 


PRODUCING AND DIRECTING 




PERSONALLY 


Otis 


Skinner in "Kismet" 




To be distributed by 




ROBERTSON COLE, Inc. 




And will continue to personally 




produce special productions of 




a similar magnitude. 



332 



Peg o' My Heart 

Through the courtesy of House, Grossman & 
Yorhaus. 

Litigation of considerable interest has arisen 
out of the contracts between J. Hartley Manners 
and Oliver Morosco respecting the production 
upon the screen by the latter of the play "PEG 
O* MY HEART." The Supreme Court of the 
United States determined the controversy in 
favor of J. Hartley Manners, holding that a con- 
veyance of the right to produce a spoken play did 
not carry with it any right to produce a motion 
picture version. The Court consequently en- 
joined the production of "PEG O" MY HEART' 
by motion pictures, but qualified its decision by 
stating that there was an implied negative agree 
ment on the part of J. Hartley Manners not to 
u-.i the ungranted portion of his copyright to 
the detriment of any rights which he may have 
granted to Oliver Morosco. As a result, the 
Court determined that while Manners was en- 
titled to an injunction against the representation 
bj Morosco of the play in moving pictures it 
would impose terms upon Manners requiring him 
also to abstain from presenting or authorizing the 
presentation of the play in that form. 

In the meantime, Morosco granted the motion 
picture production rights to the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corporation. The latter attempted several 
alterations and additions in the original scheme 
of presentation, whereupon, Manners sought an 
injunction preventing the production of the screen 
play, alleging that it was contrary to an agree- 
ment with Morosco in which it was provided that 
alterations and amendments were to be made by 
the author. 

The Court, in its decision, recognized the fact 
that a spoken play cannot be literally reproduced 
upon the screen, but the producer must convey 
by pantomimic actions and legends the subject 
matter of the action of the play ; all of which 
must, of course, be consistent with the plan of the 
play. The Court, however, held that the altera- 
tions arid additions were so radical that it con- 
stituted a substantial departure from the play as 
originally planned by Manners and consequently 
enjoined its production. 

Copyright Cases 

The Federal Court in the case of Croisset and 
Le Blanc and others against The Vitagraph Com- 
pany of America, decided that a registration of 
copyright by an agent was void for the reason 
that under the copyright existing under the Act 
of March 1909, no power existed in an agent to 
copyright anything, as that privilege was reserved 
to authors or playrights. 

In the case of National Pictures Corp ' vs. 
Foundation Films Co., the plaintiff acquired the 
motion picture rights of a play entitled "BLIND 
YOUTH." Subsequent to this the defendant ac- 
quired the exhibiting rights of a photo play en- 
titled "THE TORRENT" and commenced ex- 
hibiting the play under the title "THE BLIND- 
NESS OF YOUTH." The moving picture rights 
which the plaintiff had acquired had been exten- 
sively exploited for the two theatrical seasons pre- 
ceding. It was held that the plaintiff, as the 
owner of the motion picture rights, was entitled 
to restrain the defendant from using the title 
"THE BLINDNESS OF YOUTH" as the title 
of its play upon the ground of unfair competition. 

Unfair Methods 

The United States Federal Trade Commission, 
in the matter of Joseph Simmonds, doing business 
as the W. H. Productions Co., determined that the 
methods of competition used by the respondent 
were unfair and were violations of the Federal 
Act. Simmonds had acquired twenty-one pictures, 
featuring William S. Hart. These pictures had 
been acquired in September of 1917, and had been 
exhibited in the United States some time prior 
thereto. Simmonds exhibited these pictures under 
new names or titles, wtihout indicating that the 
films had been re-titled. The Court found that 
such acts had a tendency to mislead the motion 
picture theater-going public, into the belief that 
such re-titled pictures were different from the pic 



tures theretofore issued and shown under the 
original titles. 

The "Bannering" Decision 

Mineapolis —Following litigation that has been 
before the Hennepin County District Court in one 
form or another for three years, John J. Camp- 
bell, proprietor of the Wonderland, 27 Washing 
ton Ave. South, obtained a permanent injunction 
against the Motion Picture Machine Operators' 
Union of Minneapolis, Local 219. the Minneapolis 
Trades and Labor Assembly, as well as several 
individuals in July, from "continuing in any man- 
ner any conspiracy heretofore entered into by and 
between said persons or associations with the pur- 
pose or intent of obstructing, destroying, annoying 
harrassing or interfering with the good will, trade, 
conduct or patronage of plaintiff's business." 

It is the second decision in Hennepin County- 
District Court upholding the "open shop" policy. 

The decision was filed by District Judge W. W. 
Bardwell, before whom the action for a perman 
ent injunction was tried Sept. 23, 1919, after there 
had been action for a temporary injunction heard 
before Judge H. D. Dickinson as early as June, 
1917. 

The permanent injunction prevents the main- 
tenance of picketing or bannering of the theater, as 
"unfair to organized labor," the court finding such 
picketing and bannering as has been carried on the 
result of a conspiracy by the labor unions to im- 
properly and unlawfully restrain trade. 



CENSORSHIP 

Censorship battles in at least 36 states will be 
fought during the winter of 1921, by the Censor- 
ship Committee of the National Association. This 
indcates more legislative battles that have been 
handled in any one time which further indicates 
that censorship is still one of the most serious 
problems facing the industry. 

The Federal censorship is under discussion also 
and it would not be surprising if during the com- 
ing winter the Congress in Washington did not 
take up this question. 

New York 

Proposed censorship for New York State was 
prevented by the issuance of a report filed by Rev. 
Charles O. Judkins. 

Kentucky 

Censorship Bill passed the house but died in 
the Senate, Lee L. Goldberg, Chairman of the 
censorship committee for Kentucky. 

Massachusetts 

Gov Coolidge, vetoed a censorship bill passed by 
the legislature after one of the hardest and most 
bitterly contested battles in the history of the 
industry. Harry F. Camel, Chairman of the 
committee, handing to measure. J. Albert Brack- 
ett, Counsel. 

Missouri 

Proposed censorship never reached the floor of 
the legislature. E. M. Clarke, Saenger Amuse- 
ment Co., New Orleans, Chairman. 

A censorship board has been formed in Spring- 
field. Tb-» censors are Mrs. A. B. Sherwood and 
Mrs. W. W. Bacon. 

Oregon 

Bill introduced in legislature while not a straight 
censorship measure would have resulted in such. 
Bill was never voted upon. 

In Portland an ordinance much more satisfac- 
tory to picture men than the one in ecect, was 
passed. 

South Carolina 

After a bill had been favorably reported on fav- 
orable censorship, Jake Wells of Richmond sc 
cured a re-hearing and when the bill proposed 
was brought before the legislature it was snowed 
under. 

Virginia 

D. W. Griffith personally appeared before the 
Virginia Legislature in opposition to the proposed 
censorship bill and the bill was defeated, although 
the penal law was amended, making more severe 
the penalty for the indecent and immoral films 



333 




JOHN G. ADOLFI 

DIRECTOR OF 

"The Wonder Man" 

ROBERTSON COLE SUPER SPECIAL 

With GEORGES CARPENT1ER 

Now Directing 

MAE MARSH SUPER SPECIAL 



334 



Indiana 

The endorsement of Gov. Goodrich and the de- 
cision of City Judge Willis of Kokomo, who de- 
cided that picture theaters should be exempted 
from the old Sunday blue law, has resulted in a 
general opening of picture houses in that state on 
Sunday. . 

Wisconsin 

Tom Foster, Star Theater, Stanley, Wis., made 
a test by opening his house on Sunday and was 
acquitted of violation of the law. 

Ohio 

Members of the Ohio Valley League are keep- 
ing their houses open on Sunday despite existing 

laws. 

New York 

In Schenectady, Mayor Lunn was re-elected on 
the issue of keeping the theaters open on Sunday. 
In lamestown, Sunday openings were approved 
b\ vote of 6250 to 3050. In Albany efforts will 
be made to have the Sunday opening ordinance 
passed by the city Council. 

Pennsylvania 

Trailers and short reel offerings are subject to 
action by the state censor board, according to an 
opinion expressed by William I. Swope, deputy 
attorney general. Harry L. Knapp, chairman of 
the board, declares that the reason is that ex- 
hibitors often use trailers, consisting of scenes 
from coming productions to advertise them, pre- 
release, it being possible therefore to show ob- 
jectionable scenes. 

Japanese Censorship 

There are 16 angles in films, according to G. 
Tacliibana, chief Inspector of Films, Police Sept., 
Tokio, which will not pass muster. The tabooed 
pictures include those that: , 

Concern the Imperial family or ancestors. 

Endanger the prestige of the nation. 

Incite radical changes of government, or prin- 
ciples, or social disorder. 

Endanger the "reputation and honor enjoyed by 
great men and sages, dead or alive." 

Suggest methods of crime and means of escape. 

Injure international relationships. 

Represent "too cruel and atrocious acts or 
ignominious or obscene conducts, adultery or 
vulgar love affairs." 

Criticise current events, or suggest or discourage 
any personal affairs of individuals. 

Tend to discourage learning and lawful busi- 
ness. 

Lead children to "play mischievous sports." 

Tend to injure the dignity of schoolmasters. 

"Broken or defaced films, or films that shake 
too much (because of harm to eyes)." 

"Contradict morality, and consequently the 
principle. 'Good brings its own reward and devil 
its own punishment.' " 

FILM EXCHANGE ASSOCIATIONS 
Atlanta, Ga. 

( lias. Kessnich, Pres., Metro, Susie E. Baxley, 
Sec'y., Film Exchange Mgrs. As9*n. of Atlanta, 
26 28 Moore Bldg. 

Boston, Mass. 

Fred B, Murphy. Pres., Wm. H. Gardiner, 
Sec'y-. H Piedmont St.. New England Film Ex- 
change Mgrs. Ass'n. 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Allan B. Moritz, Pres., Famous Players, W. P. 
Allen, Sec'y., Vitagraph, 257 Franklin St., Motion 
Picture Exchange Mgrs. Ass'n. of the Buffalo 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Chicago, 111. 

J. Friedman, Pres., Celebrated Players, F. Co., 
R. C. Seery, Sec'y., Central F. Co., 110 S. State 
St., F. I. L. M. Association of Chicago, 5 So. 
Wabash Ave. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

W. W. Rowland, Pres., Metro, C. V. Zimmer- 
man. Sec'y., Associateil Film Exchanges. Chamber 
of Commerce. 



Cleveland, Ohio. 

C. A. Thompson, Pres., Dale Brown, Sec'y., 
Board of Motion Picture Exch., Mgrs., Cleveland 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Denver, Colo. 

Ward E. Scott, Pres., Pathe, W. G. Lichten- 
stein, Sect'y., Film Exchange Board of Trade. 

Detroit, Mich. 

J. M. Duncan, Pres. Vitagraph, W. E. Wilkin- 
son, Sec'y., Detroit Board of Commerce, Board of 
Motion Picture Exchange Mgrs. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

F. F. Nine, Pres., Vitagraph, Boley Bldg., L. 
D. Balsly, Sec'y., A. H. Blank Enterprises, Gloy.l 
Bldg., Kansas City Film Board of Trade. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

A. P. Michael Narlian, Sec'y., 417 Higgins 
Bldg., Los Angeles Film Exchange Board of 
Trade. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

J. L. Souther, Pres. Vitagraph, 605 Toy Bldg., 
Robt. A. Hess, Sec'y., Milwaukee Club. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

A. H. Fischer, Pres., Metro, C. W. Stom- 
baugh, Sec'y., Pathe., Minneapolis Film Board 
of Trade, 608 First Ave., North. 

New Haven, Conn. 

H. S. Scully. Pres. 132 Meadow St.. New 
Haven Film Club. 

New York City, N. Y. 

I. E. Chadwick, Merit Film, Pres., F. I. L. M. 
Club, 1482 Broadway, City. 

Omaha, Neb. 

C. E. Hclah, Pres., T. E. Delaney, Sec'y., Vit- 
agraph. Omaha Film Board of Trade, 1111 Far- 
nam St. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Robt. Lynch. Pres., Metro, Motion Picture 
Bureau of the Phil. Chamberof Commerce. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

L. F. Levison, Pres., O. T. Harden, Sec'y., 812 
Madison Ave., F. I. L. M. Club. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

S. J. Baker, Pres., First Nat'l., 617 N. Grand 
St., L. B. Schofield, Sec'y., 305 Empress Th. 
Bldg., St. Louis Film Board of Trade. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

W. E. Banford, Pres. Goldwyn, 135 E. 2 So. 
Murray W. McCarty, Treas & Counsel, 212 Felt. 
Bldg., Intermountain Film Board of Trade. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Harry L. Knappen, Pres., Select., Ben F. 
Simpson, Sec'y., Realart, San Francisco Film Ex- 
change Board of Trade. 

Seattle, Wash. 

L. O. Lukan. Pres. Pathe, 2113 Third Ave.. M. 
Rosenberg. Sec'y, De Luxe F. F. Co., 2014-3rd 
Ave.. Northwest Film Board of Trade. 

Washington, D. C. 

Win. Fuller, Pres., Martha K. Wolley, Sec'y., 
Room "US Mather Bldg., Exchange Mgrs. Ass'n. 



TAX ON GROSS BUSINESS 

FEDERAL I AN 14 PER CENT ON RENT) 

September $188,515.94 

October 182,412.61 

November 362,506.66 

December 435,454.86 

lanuary 412.979.11 

February 295,923.07 

March 565,854.47 

April 296,800.40 

May 389,295.04 

Figures not obtainable from Government be- 
yond May, at press time. 

By multiplying these figures by 20, the gross 
business done by all distributors is obtainable. 
For the above the interesting total of $62,594,843. 

These figures for 9 months would indicate an 
approximate gross for the year of $78,243,540. 



335 




VICTOR FLEMING 

DIRECTED 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS 

in 

"When The Clouds Roll By" and "The Mollycoddle" 



336 



The Year's Productions 



Alphabetically arranged list of features released from September 1, 1919 to 
September 1, 1920. Followed by lists of productions as released by various 
companies; productions of individual directors; productions of individual stars 
and cameramen. 

Key: FP-L, Famous Players-Lasky ; Gwyn, Goldwyn; Selznk, Selznick 
Enterprises, includes Selznick Pictures, Select Pictures, National Picture 
Theatres, and Republic Pictures; R-C, Robertson-Cole; Univ, Universal; Hdksn, 
Hodkinson; Vita, Vitagraph; St Rgt, State Rights; Realrt, Realart; Un Art, 
United Artists; U Pic, United Picture Theaters; Hlmark, Hallmark; 1st Nat, 
First National; Am. Cin, American Cinema. 





Releasing 


Release 






Reviewed 


Title 


Company 


Date 


Star 


Director 


\ it i . , f i 




,a ft, /on 

12 /14 /20 


Mae Murray 


Leonce Perret 


19/14 / IQ 








William Farnum 


J. Gordon Edwards 


3 17 121} 


Adventure in Hearts 


FP-L 


12/7/19 


Robert Warwick 


James Cruze 





Adventuress, The 


Selzk 


4/10/20 


Julian Eltinge 


Fred Balshofer 




Adorable Savage, The 


.... Univ 




Edith Roberts 


Norman Dawn 


8 /8 IIO 


Alarm Clock Andy 


FP-L 


3/20 


Charles Ray 


Jerome Storm 


3 /21 /20 


Alias Miss Dodd 


Univ 


6 /21 /20 


Edith Roberts 


Harry Franklin 


6/13/20 


Alias Jimmy Valentine 


Metro 


3/20 


Bert Lytell 


Not. Credited 


4/11/20 


All-of-a-Sudden Peggy 


FP-L 


2/20 


Marguerite Clark 


Walter Edwards 




Almost a Husband 


Gwyn 


10/13/19 


Will Rogers 


Clarence Badger 


10/19/19 




fA. H. 1 




Grace Darling 


NTr»(" Lrnr\\\ r n 






\Fisher / 




— 


Amateur Wife 


FP-L 


2/20 


Irene Castle 


Edward Dillon 


5 12 /20 


Amazing Woman 


Selznk 




Ruth Clifford 


Lloyd Carleton 


2 /29 /20 


t ^ t /—._„„_ ^ ■ u i 


Realrt 


1 1 /23 /19 


Mary Miles Minter 


William D. Taylor 


1 1 /O"? /1Q 
1 1 /2o / IV 


April Folly 


FP-L 


3/20 


Ma-ion Davies 


Robt. Z. Leonard 


2 /29 /20 


Arabian Knight. An 


... .R-C 




Sessue Haya'cawa 


Charles Swickard 


8/15/20 




World 




Edythe Sterling 


Not known 












Atonement 


Pioneer 




Grace Davidson 


Wm. Humphrey 












Away Goes Prudence 


FP-L 


7/20 


Billie Burke 


John S. Robertson 


7/11 /20 




Vita 




Corinne Griffith 


Edward Griffith 


7/4 /20 


Baby Marie's Round-up 


Pathe 


9/4/19 


Baby Marie Osborne 


William Bertram 




Back to God's Country 


... 1st Nat 


11/19 


Nell Shipman 


David M. Hartford 


11/9/19 




Hdksn 


11/16/19 


Doris Kenyon 


R. W. Neill 


11/30/19 


Battler. The 


World 


9/1/19 


Earle Metcalfe 


Not known 






. 1st Nat 


12/1 /19 


Katherine MacDonald 


Colin Campbell 


1/25/20 


Beckoning Roads 


R-C 


12/19 


Bessie Bassiscale 


Howard Hickman 


12/28/19 




R-C 


1 /18/20 


Sessue Hayakawa 


Wm. Worthington 


2/1/20 




.... FP-L 


12/14/19 


Hobart Bosworth 


Irwin Willat 


1 /4 /20 




.... R-C 


12/19 


Lew Cody 


W. Christy Cabanne 


11/16/19 


Below the Surface 


.... FP-L 


6/20 


Hobart Bosworth 


Irwin Willat 


6 /13 /20 



337 



Arthur Guy Empey 




Now producing a new 
comedy- drama series 
of which the first was 

" O I t L " 



GUY EMPEY PRODUCTIONS 
220 West 42nd St., New York City 



338 



Title 


Releasing 
Company 


Release 
Date 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 


Best of Luck 


Metro 




No star 


Ray Smallwood 


7/11/20 








Birth of a Soul 


. . Vita 




Harry Morey 


Edwin Hollywood 


2 /l /20 








Black Circle 


. World 


1/20/19 


Creighton Hale 


Frank Reicher 


10/19/19 


Black Gate 


Vita 




Earle Williams 


Theodore Marsten 












Black Shadows 


Fox 




Peggy Hyland 


Howard Mitchell 












Black is White 


FP-L 


2/20 


Dorothy Dalton 


Chas. Giblyn 


3 /14 /20 






11 /17/19 


Von Stroheim 


Von Stroheim 


10/19/19 


Blind Love 


/ Bacon 

■■\St. Rgt 


} 2 /1 120 


Lucy Cotton 


Oliver D. Bailey 


1/18/20 


Blind Youth 


. . . Selzk 




No star 


Edward Sloman 


6/20/20 










Blood Barrier 


. , . Pathe 


4 /ll /20 


/ Robert Gordon 
\ Sylvia Breamer 


J. Stuart Blackton 


4 /4 /20 


Blooming Angel 


. . Gwyn 




Madge Kennedy 


Victor Schertzinger 


2 /15 /20 


Blue Pearl, The 


Selznk 




Edith Hallor 


George Irving 


3/7/20 








Blue Bandanna, The 


R-C 


11 /19 


William Desmond 


J. J. Franz 










Blue Streak McCoy 


Univ 




Harry Carey 


Reeves Eason 


8 11 120 


Bonds of Love 


. Gwyn 




Pauline Frederick 


Reginald Barker 


11 /9/19 








Bonnie Bonnie Lassie 


. . . . Univ 


10/13/19 


Mary MacLaren 


Tod Browning 










Bottom of the World, The 


... R-C 






Sir Ernest Shackleton 4 li 120 














Breath of the Gods 


Univ 




Tsuru Aoki 


Rollin Sturgeon 


8/1 /20 










Pathe 




William Desmond 


J.J. Franz 


7 /4 /20 








Broken Hearts 


/ Radin \ 




Gareth Hughes 


Not known 






• • • ISt Rgt ) 







Bromley Case, The. 



Empire 
State 
St Rgt 



Glen White 



Tom Collins 



Brand of Lopez R-C 



Sessue Hayakawa 



Joseph De Grasse 



4 li 120 



Bright Skies R-C 



ZaSu Pitts 



Henry Kolker 



Broken Blossoms Un Art 10/29/19 Gish-Barthelmess-Crisp D.W.Griffith 



5/18/19 



Broken Butterfly R-C 



11/16/19 Lew Cody 



Maurice Tourneur 



10/20/19 



Broken Commandments Fox 



9/14/19 Gladys Brockwell 



Frank Beal 



9/14/19 



Brothers Divided Pathe 



12/7/19 Frank Keenan 



Frank Keenan 



1/4 /20 



Broken Melody Selznk 



11/19 Eugene O'Brien 



Wm. P. S. Earle 



12/28/19 



Brute Breaker 



. Univ 



10/20/19 Frank Mayo 



Lynn Reynolds 



11/23/19 



Bubbles Pioneer 



Mary Anderson 



Wayne Mack 



BulletProof Univ 



Harry Carey 



Lynn Reynolds 



Burning Daylight Metro 



4 ,'20 Mitchell Lewis 



Edward Sloman 



5/16/20 



Burnt Wings Univ 



Frank Mayo 



W. Christy Cabanne 



Butterfly Man R-C 



Lew Codv 



Ida May Park 



5/30/20 



Capitol, The Hdksn 



Leah Baird 



Geo. Irving 



12/21/19 



Captain Swift Vita 



Earle Williams 



Tom Terriss 



Carmen of the North Hlmark 



Anna Bos 



Not Credited 



5/23/20 



Chains of Evidence Hlmark 



I Anna Lehr 

\ Edmund Breese 



Dallas Fitzgerald 



3/7/20 



Cheater, The Metro 



4/19/20 May Allison 



Henry Otto 



Child for Sale, A. 



(Graphicl 
ISt Rgt / 



(Creighton Hale 
(Gladys Leslie 



Ivan Abramson 



3 ,28 /20 



Children Not Wanted Selzk 



5/20/20 Edith Day 



Paul Scardon 



Chorus (ilrl's Romance Metro 8/16/20 Viola Dana 



Win, C. Dowlan 



8 122 120 



339 



Florence Evelyn Martin 




In a new series of 
comedy-dramas of 
which the first was 

"OIL" 



GUY EMPEY PRODUCTIONS 
220 West 42nd St., New York City 



340 



Releasing 

Title Company 


Release 
Date 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 


Cinema Murder, The 


FP-L 


12 /14 /19 


Marion Davies 


George D. Baker 


1 /25 /20 






CO T 

r r-L. 




Robert Warwick 


Thomas Heffron 


7 /18 /20 






Climbers, The 


Vita 




Corinne Griffith 


Tom Terriss 


11/9/19 






Clover's Rebellion 


Vita 




Anita Stewart 


Wilfred North 










Combat, The 


Vita 




Anita Stewart 


Ralph Ince 










Common Level 


Trans- 
atlantic 




Edmund B.e^se 
Claire Whitney 


Burton King 






St Rgt 






Common Property 


Univ 


10, 12 /19 


R^be.'t Anderson 


Paul Powell 








Common Sin, The 


Hlmark 




Grace La ling 


Burton King 












Nat'l I 

l a s 




Henry B. Walthall 


Bertram Bracken 






St Rgt J 






Copperhead, The 


FP-L 


1 /25 /20 


Lionel Barrvtnore 


Charles Maigne 


2 /15 /20 


Corsican Brothers. The 


U Pic 


12/21 /19 


Dustin Farnuni 


Colin Campbell 


12 /28 /19 




Cost, The 


FP-L 


4/20 


Violet Heming 


Harley Knoles 


4/18/20 




Counterfeit 


FP-L 


11 /30/19 


Elsie Ferguson 


Geo. Fitzmaurice 


11/30/19 




Country Cousin 


Selznk 


10/19 


Elaine Hammerstein 


Alan Crosland 


12/14/19 




Courage of Marge O'Doone. 


Vita 




/Pauline Starke 1 
1 Niles Welch / 


David Smith 


6 /6 /20 


Crimson Shoals !st°Rgt > °' 


11 2 19 


Francis Ford 


Francis Ford 


10/26/19 




Crooked Straight 


FP-L 


11/9 /19 


Charles Ray 


Jerome Storm 


11/2/19 




Crooked Streets 


FP-L 


s _'[) 


Ethel Clayton 


Paul Powell 


8/1/20 




Cumberland Romance A 


Realrt 




Mary Miles Minter 


Charles Maigne 


8 /IS /20 








Gwyn 




/Helene Chadwick 
1 Rockcliffe Fellows 


T. Hayes Hunter 


4/11/20 








Cupid, the Cowpuncher 


Gwyn 




Will Rogers 


Clarence Badger 


8/1/20 


Curtain 


1st Nat 




^Catherine MacDonakl 


Unknown 










Cyclone, The 


Fox 


1 ,24 /20 


Tom Mix 


Cliff Smith 


1 /18 /20 




Cynthia-of-the-Minute 


Hdksn 


4 125 120 


Leah Baird 


Perry Vekroff 


7/11/18 




Dad's Girl 


Selzk 


2/20 


Jackie Saunders 


David G. Fischer 








Damsel in Distress 


Pathe 


10/12/19 


(June Caprice 
\Creighton Hale 


Geo. Archainbaud 


10/19/19 




Dancin' Fool 


FP-L 


4/20 


Wallace Reid 


Sam Wood 


5/9/20 




Dangerous Days 


Gwyn 




Lawson Butt 


Reginald Barker 


3 /21 /20 






Dangerous Hours 


FP-L 


1 /25 /19 


/Lloyd Hughes 
1 Barbara Castleton 


Fred Niblo 


2/8/20 






Dangerous Talent 


. Pathe 


3/15/20 


Margarita Fisher 


Geo. L. Cox 


3 /14 /20 




Dangerous Waters 


FxMut 


9/19/19 


Wm. Desmond 


J. J. Franz 


9/21/19 






Dangerous to Men 


Metro 


2 /20 /20 


Viola Dana 


Not Credited 


4/18/20 








Dangerous Affair 


Hlmark 




Herbert Rawlinson 


Charles Miller 










Daredevil, The 


. Fox 


12 17 /19 


Tom Mix 


Tom Mix 


3 /14 /20 






Dark Mirror 


FP-L 


4 /20 


Dorothy Dalton 


Charles Giblyn 


5 /23 /20 






Darkest Hour, The 


.Vita 




Harry Morey 


Paul Scardon 










Dark Lantern 


Realrt 




Alice Brady 


John S. Robertson 


8 /8 120 








Daughter of Two Worlds 


1st Nat 


1 (5 120 


Norma Talmadge 


James Young 


1/11/20 






Day's Pleasure, A 


1st Nat 




Charles Chaplin 


Charles Chaplin 


12/21/19 








Dawn 


Pathe 


11/30/19 


] Sylvia Brenner 
(Robert Gordon 


J, --in. hi HI. i, kton 


12/7/19 





341 



J. Bennett Glazer 



General 

Manager 

and 

Comptroller 




of organization produc- 
ing a new comedy- 
drama series of which 
the first was 

"OIL" 

GUY EMPEY PRODUCTIONS 
220 West 42nd St., New York City 



342 



i Releasing 

Title Company 


Release 
Da te 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 


Dav She Paid The 


Univ 


12/21 /19 


Francelia Billington 


Rex Ingrsni 


12 /14 /19 






1 )„/. ,1 * j , ri,,, 


Fox 




George Walsh 


Dell Henderson 


5 /9 /20 










Deadlier Sex 


Pathe 


3 /28 /20 


Blanche Sweet 


Robt. Thornby 


3/21 /20 








Deadline at Eleven 


Vita 




Coiinne G.iltith 


Geo. Fawcett 


3/14/20 










Deep Purple. The 


Realrt 




Miriam Cooper 


R. A. Walsh 


5 /9 /20 


Democracy, the Vision 


D-P Inc. 


} 




Wm. Nigh 


8 /2v 1 10 


Restored 


St Rgt 


















Desert Gold 


Hdksn 




Margery Wilson 
{ E. K. Lincoln 


T. Hayes Hunter 


11 Id Ly 






I Eileen Percy 






Desert Love 


— 




Tom Mix 


Jacques Jaccard 


4/18,20 








Desert Scorpion, The • 


Empire 1 
State 
[St Rgt J 




Edmund F. Cobb 


Otis Thayer 










Desperate Hero, The 


Selzk 


6 /7 /20 


Owen Moore 


Wesley Ruggles 


6 /20 /20 






Devil's Claim 


R-C 




Sessue Hayakawa 


Chas. Swickard 


5/16/20 












Devil's Riddle . . 7» 


Fox 


12/19 


Gladys Brockwell 


Frank Beal 


2/29/20 










Devil's Pass Key 


Univ 




Eric Von Stroheim 


Von Stroheim 


4/11/20 








Discarded Woman, The 


Hlmark 




Grace Darling 


Burton King 


6 127 120 












Dollars and Sense 


Gwyn 




Madge Kennedy 


Harry Beaumont 


6 /27 /20 








Dollar for Dollar 


Pathe 


5 12 /20 


Frank Keenan 


Frank Keenan 


4 125 120 






Dollars and the Woman 


.Vita 




Alice Joyce . 


Geo. Terwilliger 


5 /30 /20 






Don't Ever Marry 


1st Nat 


4 , 1 1 /20 


; Matt Moore 
Marjorie Daw 


Marshall Neilan 


4 /25 /20 






Double Speed 


FP-L 


2/20 


Wallace Reid 


Sam Wood 


2 /8 /20 




Double-Dyed Deceiver 


Gwvn 




Jack Pickford 


Al Green 


6 120 20 








Down on the Farm 


Un Art 


4 /25 /20 


Louise Fazenda 


\Erle Kenton and 
\Ray Gray 


5 12 120 




Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 


Pioneer 




Sheldon Lewis 


Not credited 










Dragon Painter The 


R-C 


9/19 


Sessue Hayakawa 


Wm. Worthington 


10/12,19 


Dream Cheater 


Hdksn 




J. Warren Kerrigan 


Ernest C. Warde 


3/21 ;20 






Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 


FP-L 


4 /20 


John Barrymore 


John S. Robertson 


4 /4 /20 


Duds 


G y 




Tom Moore 


Thomas R. Miles 


3/21/20 






Karth bound 






No stars 


T. Hayes Hunter 


8/15/20 






Eastward Ho! 


Fox 


11 /23 /20 


William Russell 


Emmett J. Flynn 


11/23/19 




Easy to Get 


.FP-L 


3/20 


Marguerite Clark 


Walter Edwards 


2 /29 /20 


Egg Crate Wallop 


FP-L 


9/28/19 


Charles Ray 


Jerame Storm 


10/12/19 






( 

Empty Arms 


Photo- 1 
) P'ay 




Gail Kane 


Frank Reicher 






1 Library I 
tot Kgt J 






Erstwhile Susan 


Realrt 


11/16/19 


Constance Binney 


John S. Robertson 


12/7/19 






Eternal Mother 


Utd Pic 




Florence Reed 


William Davis 


* *•»;■ * • 










Fox 


9/21 /19 


Miriam Cooper 


R. A. Walsh 






1st Nat 




Grace Darling 


fB. A. Rolfe and 1 










\Chas. De Vonde / 




Eve in Exile 


Pathe 


12/20/19 


Charlotte Walker 


Burton George 


12/14/19 


Everything But the Truth 


Univ 




Lyons-Moran 


Lyons-Moran 


5/16/20 








Every woman 


FP-L 


12/19 


Violet Heming 


George Melford 


12/21/19 


Excuse My Dust 


FP-L 


3/20 


Wallace Reid 


Sam Wood 


3 /28 /20 







343 



Philip Quinn 



Manager of 

Actual 

Production 




for the new series 
of comedy-dramas 
of which the first was 

"OIL" 



GUY EMPEY PRODUCTIONS 
220 West 42nd St., New York City 



344 



Title 



Releasing Release 
Company Date 



Star 



Director Reviewed 



Eyes of Youth Equity 10/26/19 Clara Kimball Young Albert Parker 11/16/19 



r air and Warmer 


. Metro 


11 /19 


May Allison 


Henry Otto 


I A no no 

I I j / 1 y / 1 y 


_„ . « 


Fox 




Peggy Hyland 


Howard M. Mitchell 


o iq /on 

J \0 / JU 






Faith of the Strong 


Selzn k 


9/19 


Mitchell Lewis 


Robt. North Bradbury 


9/21/19 




i .11 iii 

rallen Idol 


. Fox 




Evelyn Nesbit 


Kenean Buel 


1 A /Oft /I Q 

lo /Jo / iy 






i ^ i „ j ^ 


Pat he 


9 /21 /19 


Frank Keenan 


Ernest C Warde 


10 /5 /19 






FP-L 


4 /20 


Enid Bennett 


Fred Niblo 


- it o ic\r\ 

o / lo /JO 






1st Nat 


3/15/20 


' Florence Vidor 
I Roscoe Karns 


King Vidor 


5 12 120 






Ben Alexander 


Fear IVfarket 


Realrt 




Alice Brady 


Kenneth Webb 


1/11/20 








Feud, The 


Fox 




Tom Mix 


E. J. LeSaint 












Fickle Women 


fD. N. S. 1 

I.St Rgt J 




David Butler 


Fred. J. Butler 


8/15/20 


Fighting Chance The 


FP-L 




Anna Nilsson 


Charles Maigne 


7 /25 /20 








Fighting Colleen 


Vita 




Bessie Love 


David Smith 


11/16/19 








Fighting Cressy 


Pat he 


1/11 /20 


Blanche Sweet 


Robt. Thornby 


12 /14 /19 


Fighting Shepherdess 


1st Nat 


3/1 /20 


Anita Stewart 


(Edward Jose and 
\ Millard Webb 


4 /4 /20 








belzk 


c ioi inn 

o /21 /20 


Eugene O'Brien 


Robert Ellis 


ft /OA /OA 
t> / JU / JU 








.rox 




Buck Jones 


1 nomas rienron 


7/18 ion 








Fires of Youth 


1st Nat 




No star 


D. W. Griffith 














. K-C 




Beatriz Michelena 


Geo. Middleton 














. Gwyn 


11/9 /19 


Geraldine Farrar 


Reginald Berker 


11 /9 /19 








Fox 




Gladys Brockwell 


Edward J. LeSaint 


1 O IOO /OA 

12 j2o 120 








C«l • -« ft 


. Vita 




'Harry T. Morey 


Edwin Hollywood 


1 /Ifl /OA 
4/iO / JU 




. Selznk 


5 /10 /20 


Olive Thomas 


Alan Crosland 


r inn inn 
O J&O / JU 






rool and Mis Money, A 


. Selznk 


6 /J9 /JO 


Eugene O'Brien 


Robert Ellis 


i iok ion, 
4 /Jo / JU 


rootiignts and Shadows 


Selznk 


1 /Jo / JV 


Olive Thomas 


John W. Nome 


O It K /OA 
J / 1 0 / JU 






9 /19 /19 


H. B. Warner 


Park Frame 


y /Jo / iy 






Forged Bride, The 


L'niv 




Mary MacLaren 


Douglas Gerrard 


2/1/20 








Forbidden 




9/1/19 


Mildred Harris Chaplin 


Lois Weber 


1 /18/20 






Forbidden Trails 


Fox ■ 




Buck Jones 


Scott Dunlap 


5/23/20 








Forbidden Woman, The 


Equity 




Clara Kimball Young 


Harry Garson 


2 /29 /20 












9/15/19 


(Arthur Ashley 
[Dorothy Green 


Harry 0. Hoyt 


n ioi /i q 






For the Soul of Rafael 


Equity 


5 /20 


Clara Kimball Young 


Harry Garson 


5 /30 /20 


Fortune Hunter, The , 


.Vita 




Earle Williams 


Tom Terriss 


2 122 120 








Fortune Teller, The 


R-C 




Marjqrie Rambeau 


Albert Capellani 


5/16/20 








Fourteen th \lan The 


FP-L 


7 /20 


Robert Warwick 


Unknown 










Frivolous Wives 


(Fidelity 1 
■ISt Rgt / 




(Vera Sisson \ 
\ Kathleen Kirkman/ 


J osepn Ai ax well 












Tri 




Alice and Frances Mann 


Geo. Ridgewell 












i* ujiitive irom [via trimony , A 




1 1 /io 


14 R Mr,.. 

ri. rs. w arner 


Henry King 


19 17 /I 0 


Garter Girl, The 


, .Vita 




Corinne Griffith 


Edward Griffith 












Gauntlet. The 


.Vita 




Harry Morey 


Edwin L. Hollywood 


7/25/20 


Gay Lord Quex 


. Gwyn 


11/30/19 


Tom Moore 


Harry Beaumont 


12/21 /19 


Gay Old Don 


Pat he 


11/2/19 


John Cumberland 


Hobart Henley 


11 /9/19 







345 



Harry Lee 



Studio 

Manager 

and 

Casting 
Director 




Casting a new comedy- 
drama series of which 
the first was 

"OIL" 



GUY EMPEY PRODUCTIONS 
220 West 42nd St., New York City 



346 



Title 


Releasing 
Gom party 


Release 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 


Girl in the Knin A 


Univ 




Anne (_ ornwall 


Rollin Sturgeon 


6 127 120 










Girl in the Web The 




q /i = /on 


Blanche Sweet 


Robert Thornby 


7 125 120 


Girl of the Sea 


Selzk 




Deny nuuuiu 


J. Winthrop Kelley 










(lift Ciinromo 




9 ton 


Bernard Durning 


Ollie L. Sellers 


5 /9 120 


Girl in Bohemia 




1 1 '^n /i Q 

1 1 i)U / 1 *f 


Peggy Hyland 


Howard M . Mitchell 


11/9/19 


Girl in Mumhpr 2Q 


Un 




Frank Mayo 


Tack F"orrl 

J <3A- fv 1 XJl 11 


4 14 120 












FP-L 


19/91 /I Q 


Marguerite Clark 


Wal ter Edwards 


1 /25 /20 


Girl Who Dared The 


Selzk 




H/Liynic oici ling 


Cliff Smith 


8/22/20 












Glorious Lady 




i n /i q 


Olive Thomas 


flo t\ r ty f± Trvinc 
vjcui s c ii viiig 


11/9/19 


Golden Shower 


Vita 


1 1 /l Q 


Gladys Leslie 


John W. Noble 


12 /21 /19 


Go and Get It 


1st Nat 




Neilan Prod . 


Marshall Neilan 


7 /25 120 










Going Some 


Gwyn 




Rex Beach Prod. 


Harry Beaumont 


7 126 120 










Gray Wolf's Ghost, The 


R-C 


10 /19 


H. B. Warner 


Park Frame 










Gray Towers Mystery 


. .Vita 




Gladys Leslie 


John W. Noble 


11/2/19 












1/28 /20 


(Lieut. O. L. Locklear 
\ Francelia Billingtori 


Jacques Jaccard 


1/4/20 


Greater Than Fame 


Selznk 


1 /5 /20 


Klaine Hammerstein 


Alan Crosland 


1 /18/20 


Greatest Question 


1st Nat 


12 /29 /19 


Gish-Harron-Fawcett 


D. W. Griffith 


1 /4 /20 


Great Accident, The 


Gwyn 




Tom Moore 


Harry Beaumont 


6 /27 /20 








Great Shadow, The 


Selzk 




Tyrone Power 


Harley Knoles 












Great Redeemer, The 


Metro 




Tourneur Prod. 


Clarence Brown 


8 /29 /20 








Green Flame 


Hdksn 


7 /18 /20 


J. Warren Kerrigan 


Ernest C. Warde 


7/11/20 


Green Swamp, The 


Unt. Art 




Bessie Barriscale 


Unknown 












Grim Game 


FP-L 


10 /12/19 


Houdini 


Irvin Willat 


9/7/19 


{ _ iitn-Fidhtlnt} f^an t~1 c±n 
\r U II I 1 1 ' 1 1 & vie 1 1 iiciiicii . 

1 




11 /19 


Harry Carey 


Jack Ford 


11 /30/19 


( , 1 1 i 1 f v f\f ¥ .rtvp 


FP-L 


8 /20 


Dorothy Dalton 


Unknown 










Hairpins 


FP-L 


8 /20 


Enid Bennett 


Fred Niblo 


8 /8 /20 


llirv^ct \1 nnn ' 1 * h < • 


HHU«sn 




Doris l^enyon 


J. Searle Dawley 


4/11 /20 


[fann find Kho Hnwc 


R-C 


1 2 /2R /1Q 


H. B. Warner 


Henry ICing 


1 /18 /20 


Hawthorne of the USA 


FP-L 


12 /21 /19 


Wallace Rpid 


James Cruze 


11 /30 /19 


Heart of a Child 


M etro 


3 /20 


N azimova 


Ray. C. Smallwood 


4/11/20 


Heart of a Gypsy 


Hlmark 


12 /6 /19 


Florence Billings 


Henry McRae Webster 12/7/19 


Heart of Juanita 


R-C 




Beatriz M ichelena 


George Middleton 


12/7/19 








Meirr of thp Hills 


1st Nat 


19 /fi /1Q 


Ayfanr Piclrf r»rd 


S. A. Franklin 


12/7/19 


Heart Strings 




1 /18 /20 


William Fa mum 


J. Gordon Edwards 


1 /4 /20 


Heart of Twenty 


R-C 




Zasu Pitts 


Henry Kolker 


6 127 120 








Held in Trust 


\1 e t ro 


8 /2 /20 


W a v Alii *iori 

i*ioJ r*.uia\Jii 


John E. Ince 


8./15/20 


Help Wanted~~Male 


Pathe 


9 /27 /20 


Blanche Sweet 


Henry King 


& 122 110 


Hellion The 


Pathe 




M argarita Fisher 


Geo. L. Cox 


10/5/19 








Hell Ship The 


Fox 




Madlaine Traverse 


Scott Dunlap 


2/15/20 








Her Elephant Man 






Shirley M ason 


Scott Dunlap 


2/1/20 








Her Five Foot Highness 


Uruv 




Edith Roberts 


Henry Franklin 


4 /4 /20 








Her Kingdom of Dreams 


let Nat 


9 /15 /19 


Anita Stewart 


Marshall Neilan 


10/5/19 


Her Game 


Utd Pic 


10/19/19 


Florence Reed 


William Crane 










Her Honor the Mayor 


Fox 




Eileen Percy 


Paul Cazeneuve 


% 111 120 









347 



Ben Garetson 






A 1 ■ * * 

Advertising 


1 Be ' 
f< 






and 


A. 

m b 






Publicity 


" ' Br 






Manager 


■ \ 
■ ' HA 








■ t 

"-"--'■ft 








■i K BL 








■1 


«*^HB ■ 






1 a S3 m n 


1 
























mE^^kbH^hhh^b^h^B 




Exploiting" a new 






comedy-drama series 






of which the first was 






"OIL" 








GUY EMPEY PRODUCTIONS 




220 West 42nd St., New York City 



348 



Title 


Releasing 
Com pit ii \ 


Release 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 




JW. L. R. \ 
' ' I St Rgt ] 


- 


Matty Roubert 


W. L. Roubert 


8 /IS /20 


Hidden Code 


Pioneer 




Grace Davidson 


Richard Lestrange 












High Speed 


Hlmark 


i m 120 


/ Edward Earle 
( Gladys Hulette 


Charles Miller 


1/11/20 



His Divorced Wife Univ 11/17/19 Monroe Salisbury Douglas Gerrard 11/9/19 





T?P T 




Elsie Ferguson 


Hugh Ford 


3/14/20 








mis iviajesty, tne American 


. . un Art 


o ii /in 


Douglas Fairbanks 




9 /28 /19 


Hie Official Pi^nroo 






Vivian Martin 


Robt. G. Vignola 


10/12/19 








His Temporary Wife 


Hdksn 




J Ruby de Remer 
\ Eugene Strong 


Joseph Leverinj 


1 125 /20 


His Wife's Friend 


FP-L 


12/21/19 


Dorothy Dalton 


Jospeh DeGrasse 


2/15/20 








His Wife's Money 


Selznk 


2/16/20 


Eugene O'Brien 


Ralph Ince 


2/29/20 








His Father's Wife 


. .World 


9/8/19 


June Elvidge 


Not known 











Hitchin' Posts 


Univ 




Frank Mayo 


Jack Ford 


8 129 120 










Homer Comes Home 


FP-L 


7/20 


Charles Raj- 


Jerome Storm 


7 /4 /20 








Honey Bee 


Pathe 




Mme. Sylva 


Rupert Julian 


5 /23 /20 










ii.. ...ii.. -i' i 




9/1 /19 


Mary Pickford 


S. A. Franklin 


9/7/19 










Hope, The 


Metro 


9/1 /20 


No stars 


Herbert Blache 


8 /29/20 










house of Intrigue 


ExMut 


9/19/19 


Sessue Hayakawa 


Lloyd Ingraham 










House of Toys 


Pathe 


6/20 


Seena Owen 


George Cox 
— ■ 


5/30/20 






Huckleberry Finn 


FP-L 


2/20 


Lewis Sargeant 


Wm. D. Taylor 


2/29/20 


Human Collateral 


Vita 




Corinne Griffith 


Laurence Windom 


















6 /28 ,'20 


Harry Carey 


Reeves Eason 


6 /20 /20 










FP-L 




(Alma Reubens 
*i Vers (jordon 


Frank Borzage 


5 /9 /20 








[Dore Davidson 




1 Gaumt 

.lCf R a t 
1 I\.gL 


1 


Vivian Martin 


Joseph Levering 








J 




Idol Dancer, The 


1st Nat 


3 /22 /20 


j vidi nit oc y iiiLiu i 

\ Richard Barthelmess 


D. W. Griffith 


3/28/20 








If I Were King 


Fox 




William Farnum 


J. Gordon Edwards 












Imp, The 


Selzk 


1/12/20 


Elsie Janis 


Robert Ellis 












Impossible Catherine 


Pathe 


10/19 


Virginia Pearson 


J. B. O'Brien 










Illustrious Prince, The . 


ExMut 


9/19 


Sessue Hayakawa 


Wm. Worthington 


11/16/19 






Inferior Sex, The 


1st Nat 


3 /8 /20 


Mildred Harris Chaplin 


Jos. Henaberry 


5 /9 /20 






In Honor's Web 


Vita 




Harry Morey 


Paul Scardon 


11/9/20 












FP-L 


in It, /1 Q 


Robert AVarwick 


Hugh Ford 


10 /19 /19 






In lllil k t< ti 1 i ■ ,-L' v 


1st Nat 


19/1^/10. 


Anita Stewart 


Marshall Neilan 


12 /29 /19 






In nor V . 1 1 1 " . ' * | 'ho 






IV T i n rrt\ n 

lit. IV. 1 .III 1 "II 


R. Wm. Neill 


3 /28 /20 










In Search of a Sinner 


1st Nat 




Constance Talmadge 


David Kirkman 


3/14/20 








In Walked Mary 


Pathe 




June Caprice 


Geo. Archainbaud 


2 /29 /20 








In Wrong 


1st Nat 


10/19/19 


Jack Pickford 


James Kirkwood 


12/21/19 






In Folly's Trail 


Univ 




Carmel Myers 


Rollin S. Sturgeon 


8 /22 /20 










Selzk 




No stars 


/Tom Mills and \ 


8 IS 120 








\Nat Deverich / 




. FP-L 


11 /20/19 


Irene Castle 


Charles Maigne 
















Madlaine Traverse 


Denison Clift 


6 /6 /20 










Unt Pic 




Dustin Farnum 


Unknown 













349 



Harry L. Keepers 



Manager 
Negative 
Production 




Now supervising camera 
work on a new comedy- 
drama series of which 
the first was 

"OIL" 

GUY EMPEY PRODUCTIONS 
220 West 42nd St., New York City 



350 



Title 


Releasing 
Company 


Release 
Date 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 


Isle of Goncjuest 


Selznk 


10 ,26 /19 


Norma Talmadge 


Edward Jose 


11/9 /19 


It Happened in Paris 


1 Tyrad 




Mme. Yorksa 


David M. Hartford 


3 /7 /20 




\St. Rigt 






It Pays to Advertise.. 


FP-L 


11/23/19 


Bryant Washburn 


Donald Crisp 


11 /30/19 










FP-L 


3/20 


Robert Warwick 


Wm. C. DeMille 


4/4/20 










Jacknife Man, The 


1st Nat 




No stars 


King Vidor 


8 /8 /20 










Jennie 


Selzk 


7/19/20 


Olive Thomas 


Unknown 










Jenny Be Good 


Realrt 




Mary Miles Minter 


Wm. D. Taylor 


5/16/20 










Jes' Call Me Jim 


Gwyn 




Will Rogers 


Clarence Badger 


5/30/20 










Jinx 


Gwyn 


12/13/19 


Mabel Normand 


Victor Schertzinger 


9/28/19 










FP-L 


11/9/19 


William S. Hart 


Lambert Hillyer 


11/23/19 








Joyous Liar, The 


Hdksn 




J. Warren Kerrigan 


Ernest C. Warde 


12/14/19 










Joyous Troublemaker. . 


Fox 




William Farnum 


J. Gordon Edwards 


6 /20 /20 










Jubilo. 




12/7/19 


Will Rogers 


Clarence Badger 


12/14/19 








Judy of Rogues Harbor 


Realrt 




Mary Miles Minter 


William D. Taylor 


2/8/20 












Selzk 




Roy Stewart 


Howard Hickman 












Kathleen Mavourneen 


Fox 


10/12/19 


Theda Bara 


Charles J. Brabin 













Hdksn 


4/18/20 


Mitchell Lewis 


Roy Clements 


3 /21 /20 








Kitty Kelly, M.D 


R-C 


10/19 


Bessie Barriscale 


Howard Hickman 










La Belle Russe 


Fox 


9/21/19 


Theda Bara 


Chas. Brabin 


9/21/19 






Lady in Love, A 


FP-L 


4/20 


Ethel Clayton 


Walter Edwards 


5 /23 /20 






L' Apache 


FP-L 


11/2/19 


Dorothy Dalton 


Jos. DeGrasse 


12/14/19 






I a sea 


Univ 


12/8/19 


Edith Roberts 


Norman Dawn 


11/23/19 








Lahoma 


Pathe 


8 129 120 


No stars 


Edgar Lewis 


8/29/20 






Ladder of Lies, The 


FP-L 


7/20 


Ethel Clayton 


Tom Forman 


7/11/20 








La La Lucille 


Univ 




Eddie Lyons-Lee Moran 


Lyons- Moran 


7/18/20 










Last of His People, The 


Selznk 


12/20/19 


Mitchell Lewis 


Robt. N. Bradbury 


12/21/19 






Last of the Duanes 


Fox 


10/12/19 


William Farnum 


J. Gordon Edwards 


10/5/19 






Last Straw, The 


Fox 




Buck Jones 


Denison Clift 


2/1/20 










Realrt 




No stars 


Phurlps Mijlpr 
v 11*11 iviiiici 












Leave It To Me 


Fox 




William Russell 


Emmett J. Flynn 


5/2 /20 












1 


'Douglas Maclean! 
Doris May J 


Lloyd Ingraham 


6/20/20 




r r-L 


iu /£> /iy 


[Jack Holt 
Seena Owen 
| Wallace Beery 
] Pauline Starke 
Tully Marshall 
( Lew Cody 


Maurice Tourneur 


10/12/19 






Life's Twist 


R-C 




Bessie Barriscale 


Wm. Christv Cahanne 7/25/20 












Lifting Shadows 


Pathe 


4 14 120 


Emmy Wehlen 


Leonce Perrett 


3 /28 /20 






Lincoln Highwayman 


Fox 


12/28/19 


William Russell 


Emmett J. Flynn 


1 /4/20 


Li Ting Lang 


R-C 




Sessue Hayakawa 


Charles Swickard 


7/11/20 








Little Cafe 


Pathe 


6 /6 /20 


Max Linder 


Raymond T. Bernard 


6/6/20 






Little Wanderer 






Shirley Mason 


Howard M. Mitchell 


8/15/20 








Little Shepherd of Kingd 


om 

Gwyn 




Jack Pickford 


Wallace Worsley 


2/20/20 


Live Sparks 


Hdksn 


1 /18/20 


J. Warreh Kerrigan 


Ernest C. Warde 


1/25/20 






Live-Wire Hick 


Pathe 




William Russell 


Unknown 













351 



STUniQ 




HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 



BIGGER and BETTER pictures for the 
the coming year. 

My personal supervision will be given to all 
productions. 

EXHIBITORS and EXCHANGEMEN 

are assured of pictures of artistic excellence 
and box office value. 

LOUIS BURSTON, President 

BURSTON FILMS Inc. 



Longacre Building 
New York City 



6050 Sunset Boulevard 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



352 



Title 


Releasing 
Company 


Release 
Date 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 






4 /28 /20 


Tsuru Aoki 


Wm. C. Dowlan 


4 /18/20 














11 /19 


Bert Lytell 


Jack Conway 


Q /Oft l\Q 








i .. .. ii.. .1 ' i ■ i. 


/Alexander 
•• ISt Rgt 




Roy Stewart 


( lift Smith 
'INI OllllLll 


4/11 /20 


Lone Wolf's Daughter, The 


Hdksn 


12/14/19 


Louise Glaum 


J. Parker Read 


ill 1 1 A |1Q 
\.L /II f Lit 


Long Arm of Mannister . . 


/ Pioneer 
• • \St Rgt 




Henry B. Walthall 


Bertram Bracken 








10/6/19 


Ora Carew 


Wm. C. Dowlan 


10/5/19 












Hdksn 




J. Warren Kerrigan 


Ernest C. Warde 
















11 /19 


Madlaine Traverse 


Edmund Lawrence 


i >> /7 iiq 














10/5/19 


(Elinor Fair 
\Albert Ray 


Scott Dunlap 


11/2/19 


Lottery Nfan The 


FPL 


10 /12 /19 


Wallace Reid 


James Cruze 


10/19/19 








Love Expert, The 


1st Nat 


4/18/20 


Constance Talmadge 


David Kirkland 


5 12 120 














Shirley Mason 


Howard M. Mitchell 


5 /30 /20 








Loves of Letty, The 


Gwyn 




Pauline Frederick 


Frank Lloyd 


2/15/20 








Love ^Vithout Question 


• ■ \St Rgt 




Olive Tell 


B. A. Rolfe 


4 /4 /20 


Love Flower, The 


Un. Art 




J Richard Barthhelmess 1 


D. W. Griffith 


8 /29 /20 








I Carol Dempster 




Love Madness 


Hdksn 




Louise Glaum 


Joseph Henaberry 


8 /8 /20 








Love or Money 


Hlmark 




Virginia Lee 


Burton King 












Love Honor and ^ 


Hlmark 




(Stuart Holmes! 
\ Ellen Cassidy / 


Harry M acRae Webster 


I 11;- 

Love Wins 


H. & H. 




Violet Mersereau 


Not Credited 












Love's Flame 


j Fidelity \ 




No star 


Not Credited 


6 /13 /20 




■ ■ [St Rgt / 




Luck in Pawn 


FP-L 


11/9 /19 


Marguerite Clark 


Walter Edwards 


12/21/19 






Luck of oeraldine Laird . . 


R-C 


1 /25/20 


Bessie Barriscale 


Edward Sloman 


2 11 120 






Luck of the Irish The 


Realrt 




1 Anna Q. Nilsson 
i james Kirkwood 


Alan Dwan 


1 /25 /20 








Lure of Ambition, Ine 


Fox 


12 /21 /19 


Theda Bara 


Edmund Lawrence 


11/16/19 






Male and Female 


FP-L 


1 1 /16 /19 


J Gloria Swanson 
{ Thomas Meighan 


Cecil B. DeMille 


11/30/19 






Man Who Dared 


Fox 




William Russell 


Emmett J. Flynn 


8 /8 /20 








Madonnas and Men 


I Jans J 




No star 


B. A. Rolfe 


6 /20 /20 




^Ol I\ - 1 J 




Man and His Woman 


Pathe 


7/18/20 


Herbert Rawlinson 


J. Stuart Blackton 


7/18/20 


Man and Woman 


Radin 


■t i\ <\ ion 


Betty Mason 


Not Credited 










Man's Plaything 


. . .Selzk 


3/20 


Grace Davidson 


Charles P. Horan 










7t_ ¥ 


. . Selzk ' 


5 1'A 120 


William Faversham 


George D. Baker 


6 16 !20 








. . frox 




George Walsh 


Geo. Beranger 


3/21/20 








Man There Was, A 


( Radiosoul 




Victor Seastrom 


Victor Seastrom 


2 /29 /20 




• ■ \St Rgt 




Marked Men 




12/19 


Harry Carey 


Jack Ford 


12/21/19 






Market of Souls 


. FP-L 


9/7/19 


Dorothy Dalton 


Jos. DeGrasse 


9/21/19 


Mary Ellen Comes to Town 


. . . FP-L 


3/20 


Dorothy Gish 


Elmer Clifton 


3 /28 /20 




: FP-L 


2/20 


(Douglas MacLean 
\Doris May 


Lloyd Ingraham 


3/7/20 


Marooned Hearts 


Selzk 


8 12 120 


(Zeena Keefe 1 


Unknown 








\ Conway Tearle J 




Married Life. . . 


1st Nat 




Mack Sennett cast 


Mack Sennett 


6 /27 /20 









353 




LEONCE PERRET 

Director of the recent re/eases 

"The Thirteenth Chair" "A B C of Love" 
"A Modern Salome" "Twin Pawns" 
"Lifting Shadows" 

as well as the great international film about to be shown 

"THE EMPIRE OF DIAMONDS" 



354 



Title 



Releasing 
Company 



Release 
Date 



Star 



Director 



Reviewed 



Married Virgin (s^Rg^ 



Vera Sisson 



Joseph Maxwell 



Maruja ExMut 10/19/19 H. B. Warner 



Not known 



Me and Captain Kidd World 



11/3/19 Evelyn Greeley 



Oscar Apfel 



11/16/19 



Merry-Go-Round Fox 



9/21 /19 Peggy Hyland 



Edmund Lawrence 



9/28/19 



Midnight Bride, The Vita 



Gladys Leslie 



Wm. Humphreys 



2/1/20 



Midnight Gambols Pioneer 



Marie Doro 



James McKay 



6 127 /20 



Misfit Wife Metro 



7/19/20 Alice Lake 



Edwin Mortimer 



7/18 /20 



Mind the. Paint Girl 1st Nat 11/10/19 Anita Stewart 



Wilfred North 



11 /30/19 



Miracle of Love FP-L 



11/23/19 



(Lucy Cotton 
\Wyndham Standing 



Robt. Z. Leonard 



12/28/19 



Miracle of Money Pathe 



5 /9 /20 No Stars 



Hobart Henley 



5/2/20 



Misfit Earl, A Gwyn 



10/1/19 Louis Bennison 



Ira Lowry 



11 /16/19 



Miss Crusoe 



World 



9/29/19 Virginia Hammond 



Frank Crane 



10/5/19 



Miss Gingersnap Pathe 



11/23/19 Marie Osborne 



William Bertram 



Miss Hobbs Realrt 



Wanda Hawley 



Donald Crisp 



6/20/20 



Modern Salome, A Metro 



2/1/20 Hope Hampton 



Leonce Perret 



1 /25/20 



Molly and I Fox 



Shirley Mason 



Howard Mitchell 



3 /21 /20 



Mollycoddle, The Untd Art 6/13/20 Douglas Fairbanks 



Victor Fleming 



6 /20 /20 



Moon Madness R-C 



Edith Storey 



Colin Campbell 



8/1/20 



Moonshine Trail Pathe 



10/19/19 Sylvia Breamer 



J. Stuart Blackton 10/26/19 



More Deadly than the Male FP-L 



12/7/19 Ethel Clayton 



Robt. Vignola 



12/14/19 



Mother of His Children, The Fox 



Gladys Brockwell 



Edward Le Saint 



4/11/20 



Mothers of Men Selznk 



2 /20 Claire Whitney 



Edward Jose 



3 17 120 



Mrs. Temple's Telegram FP-L 



4 /20 Bryant Washburn 



James Cruze 



5/16/20 



Mutiny of the Elsinore Metro 



Mitchell Lewis 



Edward Sloman 



7 /25 /20 



Mystery of 
Washington Square 



] Fidelity 1 
\St Rgt / 



No stars 



Beverly C. Rule 



My Husband's Other Wife Pathe 



1 14 120 



/Sylvia Breamer 
I Robert Gordon 



J. Stuart Blackton 12/21/19 



My Lady's Garter FP-L 



3/20 



(Wyndham Standing 
{ Sylvia Breamer 
H. E. Herbert 



Maurice Tourneur 



3/21/20 



Mystery of the Yellow Room Realrt 10/19/19 No stars 



Emile Chautard 



10/26/19 



Neglected Wives 



J Wistaria 
\St Rgt 



Anne Luther 
Claire Whitney 



Burton King 



4/25/20 



No. 99 Hdksn 



J. Warren Kerrigan 



Ernest C. Warde 



5 /23 /20 



Nothing But Lies Metro 



5/20 Taylor Holmes 



Lawrence Windom 



5 /23 /20 



Nothing But the Truth Metro 



12/19 Taylor Holmes 



David Kirkland 



1/11/20' 



Notorious Miss Lisle 1st Nat 



Katherine MacDonald 



James Young 



8/22/20 



Nobody's Girl Fed Ex 



Billie Rhodes 



Frances Grandon 



Notorious Mrs. Sands R-C 



Bessie Barriscale 



W. Christy Cabanne 



Nurse Mar jorie Realrt 4/4/20 Mary Miles M inter 



Wm. D. Taylor 



3 /28 /20 



Oakdale Affair World 10/6/19 Evelyn Greeley 



Oscar Apfel 



10/12/19 



Old Lady 31 Metro 



2/20 Emma Dunn 



John E. Ince 



4 14 120 



On With the Dance FP-L 



2/20 Mae Murray 



George Fitzmaurice 2/15/20 



One Hour Before Dawn Pathe 



H. B. Warner 



Henry King 



7/18/20 



One Way Trail 



Selzk 



Edythe Sterling 



Fred Kelsey 



Open Door, The R-C 10/12/19 No stars 



Dallas M. Fitzgerald 10/19/19 



3S5 



'THE MONROE SALISBURY PLAYERS" 

take pleasure in announcing 
Mr. Sal lsbury's first independent production 

"THE BARBARIAN" 

DONALD CRISP — Director 



356 



Ti tit- 


Releasing 
Company 


Release 
Date 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 


Orphan, The 






William Farnum 


J. Gordon Edwards 


5/2 /20 








Other Men's Shoes 


Pathe 


2/1/20 


Crawford Kent 


Edgar Lewis 


1/18/20 


Out of the Dust 




No stars 


John P. McCarthy 


1/25/20 






Out of the Storm 






No star 


William Parke 


6 /20 /20 


Out Yonder 




11/19 


Olive Thomas 


Ralhp Ince 




Overland Red 






Harry Carey 


Lynn Reynolds 


2/15/20 


Paid in Advance 




9 /l /19 


Dorothy Phillips 


Allan Holubar 


11 /16/19 


Paliser Case 






Pauline Frederick 


William Parke 


2 /22 120 








Paris Green 




6/20 


Charles Ray 


Jerome Storm 


4 /25 /20 


Partners of the Night 






[Emmett Corrigan 
j Pina Nesbit 


Paul Scardon 


3 17 /20 








[Win. Davidson 


Parted Curtains 


} Nat r llm 






Bertram Bracken 






ISt Rgt 


\ 




Parlor. Bedroom and Bath. 


. . Metro 




No star 


Edward Dillon 


7 /4 /20 


Passers By 




6 /20 /20 


Herbert Rawlinson 


J. Stuart Blackton 


6 /20 /20 


Passion's Playground 


. . 1st Nat 


4 /25 /20 


Katherine MacDonald 


J. M. Barry 




Path She Chose 






Anne Cornwall 


Philip Rosen 




5 /9 /20 


"IT ~ ' 
Peddler of Lies, The 


. . Univ 


3/1/20 


Frank Mayo-Ora Carew 


Wm. C. Dowlan 


1 /25 /20 


Pegeen 






Bessie Love 


David Smith 












Perfect Woman 






Constance Talmadge 


David Kirkland 


8 11 120 








Phantom Honeymoon 


Hlmark 


10/19/19 


Marguerite Marsh 


J. Searle Dawley 




Phantom Melody 




1 /26 /20 


Monroe Salisbury 


Douglas Gerrard 


1 /25 /20 


Picadllly Jim. 




11/19 


Owen Moore 


Wesley Ruggles 


2 /8 /20 


Pinto 






Mabel Normand 


Victor Schertzinger 


2/1 /20 


Please Get Married 


Metro 


11 /19 


Viola Dana 


John Ince 


11/9/19 


Place of Honeymoons 


. Pioneer 




Montagu Love 


Unknown 












Point of View 


Selzk 


7/12 /20 


Elaine Hammerstein 


Alan Crosland 


8/8/20 


Pointing Finger, The 


Univ 


12/1/19 


Mary MacLaren 


Edward Morrissey 


12/7/19 


Poison Pen, The 




11 /10/19 


June Elvidge 


Edwin August 


11 /30/19 


Pollyanna 




1 /lo /20 


Mary Pickford 


Paul Powell 


1 /25 /20 


Polly of the Storm Country 


. . 1st Nat 




Mildred Harris Chaplin 


Arthur Rosson 










Poor Relations 






10 /19 


ZaSu Pitts 


King Vidor 


10/26/19 


Prey, The 






Alice Joyce 


Geo. L. Sargent 












ri|, -t woman rays, 1 ne 


. Hatch 




/Beatriz Michelena 
ILois Wilson 


Geo. Terwilliger 


11/2 /19 


Prince and Betty, The 


Pathe 


12/21 /19 


William Desmond 


Robt. Thornby 


12/14/19 


Prince of Avenue A, The 


. . Univ 


I \Z6 jZO 


James J. Corbett 


Jack Ford 


1/11/20 


Prince Chap, The. 




8 120 


Thomas Meighan 


William C. DeMille 


7/18/20 


Red Lane. The 


¥ T • 




Frank Mayo 


Lynn F. Reynolds 


7/11/20 


Red Hot Dollars 




12 /28 /19 


Charles Ray 


Jerome Storm 


1 /4 /20 


Regular Girl 




9 /19 


Elsie Janis 


James Young 


11 :w i'» 


iMTspti i«t oie Dy rroxy 


Pathe 


1 /12 /20 


(Sylvia Breamer 
1 Robert Gordon 


J. Stuart Blackton 


2 /l /20 


. 

Remodeling Her Husband 


. .FP-L 




Dorothy Gish 


Lillian Gish 


6 '13 /20 








Restless Sex 






Marion Davies 


Robert Z. Leonard 


6/13 /20 








Return of Tarzan 






Gene Pollar 


Harry Revier 


6 /6 /20 


Rider of the Law, The 


Univ 


11/3/19 


Harry Carey 


Jack Ford 


10/12/19 



357 




Studios: Hollywood, California 




LLOYD CARLETON 
Director 

Recent Releases: 

"THE AMAZING WOMAN" 

Starring Ruth Clifford and Edward Coxen 

"MOUNTAIN MADNESS" 

Featuring Ora Carew, Mignon Anderson, Edward Coxen, Harold Miller 

"BEYOND THE CROSSROADS" 

With Ora Carew, Melbourne McDowell, Lawson Butt 



In Preparation 

"HARD BOILED MABLE" 

Starring Ora Carew 




JOHN T. CARLETON 
Production Manager 



Clermont Photoplays 
Corporation 

LLOYD B. CARLETON 
Director General 

HANNIBAL N. CLERMONT 
President 



358 



Title 


Releasing 
Company 


Release 
Date 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 


Riders of the Dawn 


. . . Hdksn 




Roy Stewart 


Hugh R. Conway 


5 19 120 








Right of Way 




1/20 


Bert Lytell 


Jack Dillon 


2 11 120 


Right to Lie. The 


Pathe 


11/16/19 


Dolores Cassinelli 


Edwin Carewe 


12 /7/19 


Rio Grande 


Pat he 


a , on 1 Rosemary Theby 
4/25/20 ^ Allan Sears 


Edwin Carewe 


4/18/20 


River's End, The 


1st Nat 


1 


Lewis Stone 

J. Barney Sherry 

Marjorie Daw 


Marshall Neilan 


2/22/20 


Koads 01 Destiny 


. . .Gwyn 




Pauline Frederick 


Unknown 












Right to Love. The 


FP-L 




Mae Murray 1 


Geo. Fitzmaurice 


8 /29 /20 








David Butler J 


Rose of Nome ... 


Fox 




Gladys Brockwell 


E. J. LeSaint 


• 8/8/20 








Road to Divorce, The . . 


. . . Univ 




Mary MacLaren 


Philip Rosen 


3 /7 /20 








Romance 




5/23/19 


Doris Keane 


Chet Withey 


5 /23 /20 


Rouge and Riches 


Univ 


1 /19 /20 


Mary MacLaren 


Harry Franklin 


1 /4 /20 


Sacred Flame 


i' Schomer- 
■ Ross 
ISt Rgt 


11/9/19 


Emily Stevens 


A b r ci h 3 m Schomcr 


11/2 /19 


Sacred Silence 


Fox 


10/12/19 


William Russell 


Harry Millarde 


10 /26/19 


Sadie Love 


. . FP-L 


10/19/19 


Billie Burke 


John Robertson 










Safiebrusher. The 


Hdksn 




Marguerite DeLaMott 
Roy Stewart 
1 Noah Beery 


Edward Sloman 


1 /4 ,'20 




Sand 


FP-L 


1/11/20 


William S. Hart 


Lambert Hillyer 


6 127 120 


Scratch My Back 






Helene Chadwick 


Sydney Olcott 


fi 13 JO 








Scarlet Days 


FP-L 


11/30/19 


Richard Barthelmess 


L). \v . tjnrntn 


ii > 1 in 

11 Co I lit 


Scream in the Night, A 


Selznk 


JRuthBudd 
9/19 I Ralph Kellard 


Burton King 


10,2j/19 


Se j Rider, The. . 


Vita 




Harry Morey 


Edwin Hollywood 


5/30A20 








Sea Wolf, The 


FP-L 


4/20 


Noah Beery 


George Melford 


5 /23 /20 


Sealed Hearts 


Selzk 


10/19 


Eugene O'Brien 


Ralph Ince 










Seeing It Through 


R-C 


12 /19 


ZaSu Pitts 


Claude H. Mitchell 


2/15/20 


Sex :.. 


. Hdksn 




Louise Glaum 


Fred Niblo 


3/21 /20 








Servant Question, The 


Selzk 


6 /14 /20 


William Collier 


Dell Henderson 


o \2i 120 


Servant in the House 


/Film Bk 
\Office 




No stars 


Hugh Ryan Conway 


8/22/20 


Shadow of Rosalie Byrnes, The Selznk 


4/12/20 


Elaine Hammerstein 


Geo. Archainbaud 


5/16/20 


Shark, The 


Fox 


1 /18 /20 


George Walsh 


Dell Henderson 


1/11/20 


She Loves and Lies 


Selznk 




Norma Talmadge 


Chet Withey 


1 /ll /20 








Sherry 


Pathe 


5/30/20 


Pat O'Malley 


Edgar Lewis 


5/30/20 


Shipwrecked among Cannibals Univ 




No star 


Not credited. 


7 li 120 


Should a Wife Work 


. . . I lhii.uk 




Edith Stockton 


Horace G. Plimpton 












Shod With Fire 


Fox 




William Russell 


Emmett J. Flynn 


2 /22 /20 








Shore Acres 


Metro 


2/20 


Alice Lake 


Rex Ingram 


3 /28 /20 


Should a Husband Forgive? 


Fox 


11/19 


Miriam Cooper 


R. A. Walsh 


10/2b /19 


Should a Woman Tell? 


Metro 


12/19 


Alice Lake 


John Ince 


12 /28 /19 


Silk Husbands and Calico 
Wives 


/Garson 
. \St Rgt 




House Peters 


Alfred J. Green 


3/7 /20 














Silver Horde, The 


. . Gwyn 




Myrtle Stedman 


Frank Lloyd 


5/16/20 








Simple Souls 


Pathe 


5 /23 /20 


Blanche Sweet 


Robert Thornby 


5/16/20 



359 



NEAL HART 

Starring and Directing 

FEATURES FOR 

PINNACLE PRODUCTIONS, Inc. 



Title 


Releasing 
Company 


Release 
Date 


Star 


Director Reviewed 




Realrt 




Alice Brady 


Kenneth Webb 


3/21/20 


Six Best Cellars 


FP-L 


2/20 


Bryant Washburn 


Donald Crisp 


3/14/20 


Sick Abed 


FP-L 




Wallace Reid 


Sam Wood 


6 /27 /20 


Silent Barrier 


Hdksn 


7/25 


No star 


Wm. Worthington 


7/1/20 


Sister to Salome, A 


Fox 




Gladys Brockwell 


Edward J. LeSaint 


7 ji i /on 
till \£M 


Sins of St. Anthony 


FP-L 




Bryant Washburn 


Unknown 




Sky Eye 


j Sol Lesser 
■ • ■ \St Rgt 


1 /4 /20 


No star 


Aubrey M. Kennedy 


1/11/20 


Slam Bang Jim 


Pathe 




William Russell 


Edward Sloman 


4/18 /20 


Slaves of Pride 


. . . Vita 




Alice Joyce 


Geo. Terwilliger 


1/18 /20 


Sleep of Cyma Roget 


.... Pioneer 




Helen Gardner 


Charles Gaskill 




Slim Princess 


.... Gwyn 




Mabel Normand 


Victor Schertzinger 


7 /4 /20 


Smouldering Embers 


Pathe 


2 /29 /20 


Frank Keenan 


Frank Keenan 


2/15/20 


Snares of Paris 


.... Fox 


11 /2/19 


Madlaine Traverse 


Howard M. Mitchell 


11/30/19 




.... Realrt 


11 /Q / 1 Q 


jAnna Q. Nilsson 

*i 1>1 (JI Ulctll IVCI 1 J 


Allan Dwan 


t 1 lift HQ 






[ Pauline Starke 






c 






\_Jwen Moore 


Wesley Ruggles 


% \1\ /20 


Someone Must Pay 


/Graphic I 




[Gail Kane 


Ivan Abramson 


9 /28 /1W 




I St Rgt j 




1 Hugh Thompson ) 






Soul of Youth 


.... Realart 




No stars 


Wm. D. Taylor 


8/22/20 


Speed Maniac, The 


Fox 


10/19 


Tom Mix 


Edward Le Saint 


9/28/19 


Splendid Hazard 


, . 1st Nat 




Henry Walthall 


Unknown 










Alice Joyce 


Geo. Terwilliger 


3 n 120 


Splendid Sin, The 


.Fox 


9/7/19 


Madlaine Traverse 


Howard M. Mitchell 


9/7/19 


Spirit of Good 


Fox 




Madlaine Traverse 


Paul Cazeneuve 


7/11 /20 








Buck Jones 


Paul Cazeneuve 


8 /8/20 


Starvation 


1 Warren- 




No star 


Not credited 


1 /18 /20 




ISt Rgt 










Steel King, The 


World 


12/1/19 


Montagu Love 


Oscar Apfel 


11 /30/19 


Stepping Out 


FP-L 


9/21/19 


Enid Bennett 


Fred Niblo 


10/5/19 


Stolen Kiss. 


Realrt 




Constance Binney 


Kenneth Webb 


3/14/20 


Stop That Man 


Selzk 


7 /5 /20 


Owin Moore 


Unknown 




Stop Thief 


Gwyn 




Tom Moore 


Harry Beaumont 


8/7? 170 


strange uoaraer, 1 ne . . . 


Gwyn 




Will Dnffprc 


Clarence Badger 


4 /25 /20 












Stream of Life, The 


/Plymouth 


No star 


Horace G. Plimpton 


10/26/19 




^Ol ivgl 











Street Called Straight, The Gwyn 




I Milton Sills 
\Naomi Childers 


Wallace Worsley 


3 /14 /20 


Strictly Confidential 


Gwyn 


10/19/19 


Madge Kennedy 




10/12/19 


Stronger Than Death 


Metro 


1/20 


Nazimova 


rier Den dialiic 


1 /18/20 


Strongest, The 


Fox 




/ Renee Adoree 
\Harrison Hunter 


R. A. Walsh 


2 /8 /20 














Univ 


9/15/19 


Monroe Salisbury 


Rolhn Sturgeon 


9 /21 /19 


Suds 


Un Art 


6 /27 /20 


Marv Pickford 


Jack Dillon 


7 1 21 1 


Superman, The 


fW. H. 


} 


Sansonia 


Not credited 






\St Rgt 










Taking the Count 


Selzk 




William Collier 


Unknown 




Tarnished Reputations 


Pathe 


3 /14 /20 


Dolores Cassinelli 


Mine. Alice Blache 


3 R 120 



361 



JACK CUNNINGHAM^ 

was talking with Wid the other night in John's Restaurant on 
Hollywood Boulevard. It was just after the pre-view of 
Betty Compson's truly wonderful picture, "Prisoners of Love." 

Naturally both men were enthusiastic. 

"If I take a page in the Year Book, what will I say?" 
Cunningham asked. 

"Why not just give a list of the originals and adaptations 
which you have written and which have been produced in the 
last three years — it would be a record, wouldn't it?" said Wid. 

"Well, I don't know about it being a record, but I'll do it." 

So Cunningham took the page, had it charged and here 
it is: — 

The List Below Contains Only Those Feature Photoplays — 
Originals and Adaptations — Which Actually Have 
Been Produced and Released Within the 
Last Three Years: — ■ 

Two for Triangle Players; Two for Olive Thomas; One for 
Pauline Starke; Two for J. Barney Sherry; Two for Roy 
Stewart; One for Fanny Ward; Two for Bryant Washburn; 
One for Madame Yorska; Four for Bessie Barriscale; Two for 
Louise Glaum ; Two for Kitty Gordon ; Nine for Frank Keenan ; 
Nine for J. Warren Kerrigan; One for Dustin Farnum; Two 
for Robert Brunton Specials. 

MAKING FORTY-TWO IN ALL 

In addition to: Serial of fifteen episodes for Jack Dempsey. 
Two serials of fifteen episodes each for Charles Hutchison. 
Eight episodes of serial for Ruth Roland. Five episodes of 
serial for Eileen Percy and Warner Oland. Editorial work 
for Triangle. Editorial work and scenario supervision for 
Robert Brunton. An association with George Loane Tucker 
Productions. And, now holding down a very good job with 
Robert Brunton. 

NOT A BAD RECORD AFTER ALL 



362 



Title 


Releasing 
Company 


Release 
Date 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 


Tattlers, The. 






Madlaine Traverse 


Howard M. Mitchell 


3/28 /20 








Teeth of the Tiger, The 


. . FP-L 


10/26/19 


No star 


Chet Withey 


10/26/19 


Temperamental Wife 


1st Nat 


9/8/19 


Constance Talmadge 


David Kirkland 


9/28/19 


— — 

Terror, The 






Tom Mix 


Jacques Jaccard 


5 /23 /20 


Terror Island .... 




4/20 


Houdini 


James Cruze 


5 12 120 


Thieves 




12/7/19 


Gladys Brockwell 


Frank Beal 


11/2/19 






intra Oeneration. . 


. . . R-C 


1 /4 /20 


/Mahlon Hamilton 
1 Betty Blythe 


Henry Kolker 


1 /25 /20 






Third Kiss 




9/14/19 


Vivian Martin 


Robt. Vignola 


8 /24 /19 






Third Woman 






Carlyle Blackwell 


Chas. Swickard 


3 /21 /20 








Thirteenth Commandment 


. . . FP-L 


1 /4 /20 


Ethel Clayton 


Robert. G. Vignola 


2/15/20 


Thirty Thousand Dollars 


. . . Hdksn 




J. Warren Kerrigan 


Ernest C. Warde 


2 /22 /20 








Thirtieth Piece of Silver 


Pathe 




Margarita Fisher 


Geo. L. Cox 












Thou Art the Man. 


. . . FP-L 


4/20 


Robert Warwick 


Thomas Heffron 


6 /6 /20 


Three Gold Coins 






Tom Mix 


Cliff Smith 


7 /4 /20 








Through the Eyes of Men 


J Radin 
■ \St Rgt 




Frank Mayo 


C. A. Taylor 


3 /28 /20 


Thunderbolt, The. . . . 


1st Nat 


11 /23/19 


[Catherine MacDonald 


Colin Campbell 


11/23/19 


Tin Pan Alley 




12 /19 


/Elinor Fair 
lAlbert Ray 


rrank Deal 


1 9 /9ft /I U 






Toby's Bow 




12/20/19 


Tom Moore 


Harry Beaumont 


12/28/19 


Tokio Siren . . . 




6/14/20 


Tsuru Aoki 


Norman Dawn 


6/13/20 


Toll Gate, The 


FP-L 


4/20 


William S. Hart 


Lambert Hillyer 


4 125 120 


Tong Man, The 


. . . R-C 


12/19 


Sessue Hayakawa 


Wm. Worthington 


12/14/19 


Too Much Johnson 


. FP-L 


1 /4 /20 


Bryant Washburn 


Donald Crisp 


2 /22 /20 


Tower of Jewels 


Vita 




Corinne Griffith 


Tom Terriss 


1/11/20 








Trail of the Cigarette 


(Arrow 


1 


filpn Whiff* 


Tom Collins 






\St Rgt 






Treasure Island 


FP-L 


4/20 


Shirley Mason 


Maurice Tourneur 


4/18/20 






Tree of Knowledge. The 


FP-L 


1/18/20 


Robert Warwick 


Wm. C. DeMille 


1/18/20 






Trembling Hour The 


. 


ii /in no 
11/ lyj / iy 


'Helen Jerome Eddy 
1, Kenneth Harlon 


Geo. Seigman 


1U / IV* / 1 57 






Triflers, The 




1/12/20 


/Edith Roberts 
1 David Butler 


W. Christy Cabanne 


1/11/20 






Trimmed With Red. . 


Gwyn 




Mid™p Kenned >' 


Hugo Ballin 













1 rip to Mars 


/ Tower 

• • 1st Rgt 




No stars 


Not credited 


5 /30 /20 


Truth, The 


. . Gwyn 




Mad*e Kennedy 


Lawrence Windom 


8 / 29 110 


Turning Point, The 


1st Nat 




Katherine MacDonald 


J. M. Barry 












Turning the Tables 


FP-L 


11/2/19 


Dorothy Gish 


Elmer Clifton 


11/9/19 


Twelve-Ten 




12/14/19 


Marie Doro 


Herbert Brenon 


12 /28 /19 


Twenty-Three and a Half 
Hour's Leave 


. . . FP-L 


11 /16/19 


) Douglas MacLean 
Doris May 


Henry King 


11/2 /19 










Twin Pawns 


Pathe 


9/28,19 


Mae Murray 


Leonce Perret 




Twins of Suffering Creek. The Fox 




William Russell 


Scott Dunlap 


6/20/20 


Two Weeks 


1st Nat 




Constance Talmadge 


Sidney A. Franklin 


2/1/20 


U.-35 (German Submarine) 


C R Prire 


No star 


Not credited 










Undercurrent, The. . . . 


. . . Selznk 


11 /19 


Arthur Guy Empey 


Wilfred North 


12/7/19 


Under Suspicion 


Univ 


12/1 /19 


/Ora Carew 

1 Forrest Stanley 


Wm. C. Dowlan 


11/23/19 







363 



MORRIS R. SCHLANK 

Producer of 
HANK MANN COMEDIES 



364 



Title 


Releasing 
Company 


Release 
Date 


Star 


Director 


Reviewed 


Unchartered Channels 


R-C 




H. B. Warner 


Henry King 


. 6/13/20 


Under Crimson Skies 


Univ 




Elmo Lincoln 


Rex Ingram 


6 /o /20 


Under Northern Lights 


Univ 




No star 


Jacques Jaccard 


7 /25 /20 


Unknown Ranger 


/Ay won 1 




No star 


Not credited 






■ • i st Rgt : 










Untamed The 






Tom Mix 


Emmett J. Flynn 


8/29/20 


Up in Mary's Attic 


(Fine Arts 




IMn *itar 

> i tj SLal 


W. H. Watson 


8/1/20 




••'\StRgt | 














11/19 


/Elinor Fair 
(Albert Ray 


Scott Dunlap 


11 /30/19 


Valley of Tomorrow 


Pathe 


1/11/20 


William Russell 


Emmett J. Flynn 


1/18/20 


Valley of Doubt 


Selzk 


S /24 /20 


No stars 


Unknown 




Vampire, The 


Unt Pic 


3/14 /20 


Dorothy Dalton 


Not credited 




Veiled Marriage, The 


Hlmark 




Anna Lehr 


Kenean Buel 


3/14/20 


Vengeance of Durand, The 


Vita 




Alice Joyce 


Tom Terriss 


12/14/19 


Very Idea, The 




3/20 


Taylor Holmes 


Lawrence Windom 


2 /22 /20 




FP-L 


12/7/19 


/ Seena Owen 
(Jack Holt 


Maurice Tourneur 


12/7/19 


Virgin of Stamboul. The 


Univ 




Priscilla Dean 


Tod Browning 


2 /29 /20 


Virtuous Model 




O / 1 A 1 1 Q 


Dolores Cassinelli 


Albert Capellani 


9/28/19 




1st Nat 


11/16/19 


Constance Talmadge 


David Kirkland 


11 on /in 

11 /30 /19 


Walk-Offs, The 




1 /20 


May Allison 


Herbert Blache 


1 /25 /20 


Wall St. Mystery 


/Arrow 




No star 


Not credited 






} 






■ • • \St Rgt 










Wanted — A Husband 


FP-L 


12/28/19 


Billie Burke 


Lawrence Windom 


12/21/19 


Water, Water Everywhere 


Gwyn 




Will Rogers 


Clarence Badger 


2 /8 /20 


Web of Chance, The 


. . . . Fox 


11 2,111 


Peggy Hyland 


Alfred E. Green 


12/21/19 


Web of Deceit, The 


Pathe 


1 /18/19 


Dolores Cassinelli 


Edwin Carewe 


1 /4 /20 


Week-End, The 


Pathe 




Margarita Fisher 


Geo. L. Cox 




What Children Will Do 


Hlmark 




Edith Stockton 


Horace G. Plimpton 




What Happened to Jones 


FP-L 


8/20 


Bryant Washburn 


James Cruze 


8/15/20 


What's Your Hurry 


. . . FP-L 




Wallace Reid 


Sam Wood 


8/22/20 


What Women Love . 


1st Nat 




Annette Kellerman 


N. C. Watt 


8/15/20 


What Women Want 


. . . Pioneer 




Louise Huff 


Geo. Archainbaud 




What Every Woman Learns . . . FP-L 


11/9/19 


Enid Bennett 


Fred Niblo 


10/26/19 


What Would You Do? 


Fox 




Madlaine Traverse 


/Denison Clift 
(Edmund Lawrence 


1 1 £<j l ^o 












What's Your Husband Doing? FP-L 


1 /25 /20 


Douglas MacLean 
Doris May 


Lloyd Ingraham 


2/8/20 


When a Man Loves 


. . . .-Vita 




Earl Williams 


Chester Bennett 


1 /18 /20 


When Bearcat Went Dry 


World 




Vangie Valentine 


Ollie Sellers 




When the Clouds Roll By 


....UnArt 


12 /19 


Douglas Fairbanks 


Victor Fleming 


1 /4 /20 


Where Bonds Are Loosed 


World 


9 22/19 


Dixie and Arthur Behrens 


Unknown 




Where Is My Husband 


Pioneer 




No stars 


Geo. Edwards-Hall 











j Estelle Taylor 
\Marc McDermott J 


Charles J. Brabin 


8/1 /20 














. . . .Selzk 


5/17/20 


Elaine llammerstein 


Wm. P. S. Earle 


7 /4 /20 




. . . .Vita 




Corinne Griffith 


Geo. L. Sargent 


8/29/20 


White Circle, The 


FP-L 


8/20 


— w 

No stars 


Maurice Tourneur 


8 /29 /20 



365 



MAX LINDER 

For Season 1920-21 

FOUR PRODUCTIONS 
First Offering 

"SEVEN YEARS BAD LUCK" 

Written and Directed by MAX LINDER 



366 



Releasing Release _ 

Title Company Date Star Director Reviewed 

White Rider. The /Mstrpc 1 J Joe Moore and 1 Wm. J. Craft 8/22/20 

\St Rgt J (Eileen Sedgwick J 

White Dove, The R-C H.B.Warner Henry King 

White Lies Fox Gladys Brockwell Edwar d J. LeSaint 6/6/20 

White Moll Fox Pearl White Harry Millarde 7 /18 /20 

Wits vs. Wits Hlmark Marguerite Marsh Harry Gros sman 6 /6 / 20 

Who's Your Brother? { St" Rgt 3 Edith Taliaferro John G. Adolfi 10/19/19 

Who's Your Servant? R-C (wfflia^&ott Not credited 3/14/20 



(Thomas Meighan 

Why Change Your Wife? FP-L 4/20 Gloria Swanson Cecil B. DeMille 5/2/20 

I Bebe Daniels 



Why Smith Left Home 


FP-L 


10/19/19 


Bryant Washburn 


Donald Crisp 


11 /2 /19 


Widow By Proxy, A 


FP-L 


9/28/19 


Marguerite Clark 


Walter Edwards 


10 /5/19 


Willow Tree, The 


Metro 


1/20 


Viola Dana 


Henry Otto 


1/11/20 


Winchester Woman 


.Vita 




Alice Joyce 


Wesley Ruggles 


11/16/19 


Wings of the Morning 


Fox 


11/30/19 


William Farnum 


J. Gordon Edwards 


12/7/19 




Fox 


11/9 /19 


George Walsh 


Edward Dillon 


10 /5 /19 








Florence Billings 


Burton King 














Woman in His House 


. 1st Nat 




Mildred Harris Chaplin 


jonn ivi . otani 


8 /15 /20 


Wolves of the Street 


/Arrow 




No star 


Otis B. Thayer 






\St Rgt 


} 






Selzk 


3 /22 '20 


Zeena Keefe 


Laurence Trimble 


7/18/20 


Woman's Business 


/Jans 


\ 


Olive Tell 


B. A. Rolfe 


8 /l /20 




I St Rgt 


1 




Woman's Experience 


Hlmark 




Mary Boland 


rerry ,vi. vetcron 














Woman's Man 


I Arrow 


} 


Romaine Fielding 


Warren Gordon 


6 /13 /20 




'1 St Rgt 






Woman and the Puppet, The 


. Gwyn 




Geraldine Farrar 


Reginald Barker 


4/11/20 


Woman Game. The 


Selznk 


2 /23 /20 


Elaine Hammerstein 


William P. S. Earle 


3/14/20 


Woman Gives, The 


1st Nat 


3 /29 /20 


Norma Talmadge 


Roy Neill 


4/18/20 


Woman He Chose, The 


/ Mickey 




No star 


Not credited 


11 /23/19 




\St Rgt 




Woman in the Suitcase. The 


. FP-L 


i ia /on 


Enid Bennett 


Fred Niblo 


1 /18 /20 




. Gwyn 




Pauline Frederick 


Frank Lloyd 


4/11 /20 


Woman of Lies 


World 


10/13/19 

1U / lO / 


June Elvidge 


Gilbert Hamilton 


11 ! ,2 19 


Woman of Pleasure 


Pat he 


11/9/19 


Blanche Sweet 


Wallace Worsley 


9/14/19 


Woman Under Cover 


. Univ 


9/18 


Fritzi Brunette 


Geo. Seigman 


7/14/19 


Women Men Forget 


Un Pic 


3/21/20 


Mollie King 


John M. Stahl 


3 /14 /20 


Wonder Man, The 


R-C 




Georges Carpentier 


John G. Adolfi 


6 /6 /20 


World and His Wife, The 


FP-L 




Alma Rubens 


Robt. Vignola 


7 /18 /20 


World of Folly 


Fox 




Vivian Rich 


Frank Beal 


6/13/20 


Would You Forgive? 






Vivian Rich 


Scott Dunlap 


4/18/20 


Wreck, The 


. .Vita 




Anita Stewart 


Ralph Ince 


















Norma Talmadge 


R. Wm. Neill 


7/11/20 


Yellow Typhoon, The 


. . 1st Nat 


5/3/20 


Anita Stewart 


Edward Jose 


5/16 /20 


You Never Know Your Luck . 


.World 


11/17/19 


House Peters 


Not Credited 






FP-L 


2/20 


Ethel Clayton 


Walter Edwards 


3 /28 /20 


Youthful Folly 


Selznk 




Olive Thomas 


Alan Crosland 


4 /4 /20 



367 



PIONEER SPELLS QUALITY 

YOU ALWAYS CAN MAKE MONEY 
ON A PIONEER PICTURE 



Alma Rubens 
Emily Stevens 
Louise Huff 



PIONEER STARS 

Violet Mesereau 
Marie Doro 
Jose Collins 



Gail Kane 
Mary Anderson 
Marguerite Namara 



PIONEER PICTURES 

Alma Rubens in Daniel Carson Goodman's "Thoughtless Women." 
Emily Stevens in "Place of Honeymoons." Marie Doro in "Midnight 
Gambols" with Godfrey Tearle. Louise Huff in "What Women Want" 
Jose Collins in "Where Is My Husband?" Violet Mesereau and Edmund 
Cobb in "Out of the Depths'" Gail Kane and Thurston Hall in "Empty 
Arms." Violet Mesereau and Edmund Cobb in "Finders Keepers." "His 
Brother's Keeper" with Martha Mansfield, Rogers Lytton and Gladden 
James. E. K. Lincoln in "The Inner Voice." Mary Anderson in "Bubbles." 
Marguerite Namara in "A Moment's Madness." Gail Kane and J. Herbert 
Frank in "Idle Hands." Gail Kane and J. Herbert Frank in "A Good 
Woman." 

SHORT SUBJECTS 

Luke McLuke's Film-osophy "500 Feet of Laughter" 
Sonny Series, The Modern " Peck' s Bad Boy" Comedies. 

WHEREVER YOU GO— A PIONEER EXCHANGE 



PIONEER FILM CORPORATION 

A. E. LEFCOURT, President 
130 WEST 46th STREET NEW YORK CITY 



368 



Productions of the Year 



AMERICAN FILM CO. 
(Pathe release) 

Released 

Six Feet Four 

Eve in Exile 

The Hellion • 

The Valley of Tomorrow 

The Dangerous Talent 

Slim Bang Tim 

The Honey Bee — — — 

The Thirtieth Piece of Silver 

The House of Toys ' 

Peggy Rebels 

The Week-End 

A Live-Wire Hick 

EQUITY PICTURES CORP. 

Eyes of Youth 

Silk Husbands and Calico Wives 

The Forbidden Woman 

For the Soul of Rafael 

Keep to the Right 

Whispering Devils 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LA SKY CORP. 



Witness for the Defense 8-31-19 

Valley of the Giants 8-31-19 

Misleading Widow 9-7-19 

Market of Souls 9-7-19 

Third Kiss 9-14-19 

Miracle Man 9-14-19 

Told in the Hills 9-21-19 

Stepping Out 9-21-19 

Widow bv Proxy 9-28-19 

Egg Crate Wallop 9-28-19 

Life Line 10-5-19 

In Mizzoura 10-5-19 

The Lottery Man 10-12-19 

The Grim Game 10-12-19 

Why Smith Left Home 10-19-19 

Sadie Love 10-19-19 

His Official Fiancee 10-26-19 

Teeth of the Tiger 10-26-19 

John Petticoats 10-26-19 

Turning the Tables 11-2-19 

L'Apache 11-2-19 

Luck in Pawn 11-9-19 

Crooked Straight 11-9-19 

What Every Woman Learns 11-9-19 

Male and Female ,. 11-16-19 

2$y 2 Hours Leave 11-16-19 

Invisible Bond 11-23-19 

It Pays to Advertise 11-23-19 

Miracle of Love 11-23-19 

Counterfeit 11-30-19 

Scarlet Days 11-30-19 

An Adventure in Hearts 12-7-19 

Victory 12-7-19 

More Deadly Than the Male 12-7-19 

Cinema Murder 12-14-19 

Behind the Door 12-14-19 

His Wife's Friend 12-21-19 

Hawthorne of U. S. A 12-21-19 

A Girl Named Mary 12-21-19 

Wanted— A Husband 12-28-19 

Red Hot Dollars 12-28-19 

Everywoman 1-4-20 

The Woman in the Suitcase 1-4-20 

Too Much Johnson 1-4-20 

Thirteenth Commandment 1-11-20 

Tree of Knowledge 1-18-20 

What's Your Husband Doing 1-25-20 

Copperhead 1-25-20 

Double Speed 2-1-20 

All of a Sudden Peggy 2-1-20 

Six Best Cellars 2-8-20 

On With the Dance 2-15-20 

Marv's Ankle 2-15 20 

Black is White 2-22-20 

The Amateur Wife 2-22-20 

Huckleberry Finn 2-22-20 

Young Mrs. Winthrop 2-29-20 

Dangerous Hours 2-29-20 

Alarm Clock Andy 3-7-20 

His House in Order 3-7-20 



Released 



Jack Straw 3-14 20 

Mary Ellen Comes to Town 3-14-20 

Excuse My Dust 3-21-20 

April Folly 3-21-20 

My Lady's Garter 3-28-20 

Easy to Get 3-28-20 

Treasure Island 4-4-20 

Thou Art the Man 4-11-20 

The Cost 4-11-20 

The False Road 4-18-20 

Terror Island 4-18-20 

The Toll Gate 4-25-20 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 

Why Change Your Wife 5-2-20 

Mrs. Temple's Telegram 5-9-20 

The Sea Wolf 5-16-20 

The Dark Mirror 5-16-20 

The Dancin' Fool 5-23-20 

A Lady in Love 5-30-20 

Old Wives for New 6-6-20 

Below the Surface 6-6-20 

Paris Green 6-13-20 

Remodeling Her Husband 6-13-20 

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (re-issue) . 6-20-2O 

City of Masks 6-20-20 

Sick Abed 6-27-20 

Sand : 6-27-20 

Sins of St. Anthony 7-4-20 

Away Goes Prudence 7-4-20 

Let's Be Fashionable 7-11-20 

Ladder of Lies 7-11-20 

Homer Comes Home 7-28-20 

The Fourteenth Man 7-25-20 

The World and His Wife 7-25-20 

The Fighting Chance 8-1-20 

The Prince Chap 8-8-20 

Crooked Streets 8-8-20 

The White Circle 8-15-20 

What Happened to Jones 8-15-20 

Guilty of Love 8-22-20 

Hairpins 8-29-20 



THE FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS' 
CIRCUIT, INC. 



The Hoodlum 9-1-19 

A Temperamental Wife 9-8-19 

Her Kingdom of Dreams 9-15-19 

Burglar bv Proxy 9-22-19 

Back to God's Country 9-29-19 

The Thunderbolt 10-6-19 

In Wrong 10-20-19 

A Virtuous Vamp 11-3-19 

Heart of the Hills : 11-17-19 

Mind the Paint Girl 11-20-19 

The Beauty Market 12-1-19 

In Old Kentucky 12-15-19 

A Day's Pleasure 12-22-19 

A Twilight Baby 12-22-19 

The Greatest Question 12-29-19 

Daughter of Two Worlds 1-5-20 

Two Weeks 1-12-20 

Even as Eve 1-19-20 

The Turning Point 2-2-20 

The River's End 2-16-20 

In Search of a Sinner.... 2-23-20 

The Inferior Sex 3-3-20 

The Fighting Shepherdess 3-1-20 

The Family Honor 3-16-20 

Polly of the Storm Country 4-4-20 

Don't Ever Marry 4-11-20 

The Idol Dancer 4-23-20 

The Love Expert 4-25-20 

Passion's Playground 4-18-20 

The Woman Gives 3-29-20 

The Yellow Typhoon 5-3-20 

A Splendid Hazard 6-7-20 

Married Life 6-14-20 

Yes or No 6-28-20 

Go and Get It 7-12-20 

The Perfect Woman 7-19-20 

The Notorious Miss Lisle 8-2-20 

The Jack-Knife Man 8-16-20 

Forty-Five Minutes From Rroadway.... 8-20-20 

Good References 8-30-20 



369 



Buster Keaton h i s Director 




Now making two -reel releases for Joseph M. Schenck 
Released through Metro. 

Forthcoming Releases 

"ONE WEEK" "CONVICT 13" "The SCARECROW" 

370 



FOX FILM CORP. 

William Farnum Series 
Wolves of the Night 
The Last of the Duanes 
Wings of the Morning 
The Adventurer 
The Orphan 

The Joyous Touble Maker 
If I Were King 
Specials 
Evangeline 

Kathleen Mavourneen 

vu° U lt? H " sban d Forgive 

The White Moll 

While New York Sleeps 
Tom Mix Series 

The Feud 

The Speed Maniac 

The Dare Devil 

The Cyclone 

Desert Love 

The Terror 

Three Gold Coins 
Fox Entertainments 

The Splendid Sin 

Broken Commandments 

?u e , Merr y-Go-Round 

Ihe Winning Stroke 

i he Lost Princess 

Sacred Silence 

The Lost Princess 

Chasing Rainbows 

Eastward Ho 

Snares of Paris 

Vagabond Luck 

Thieves 

The Devil's Riddle 

The Web of Chance 

Tin Pan Alley 

The Lincoln Highwayman 

ihe Shark 

Shod With Fire * 

Flames of the Flesh 

Her Elephant Man 

The Hell Ship 

What Would You Do 

The Last Straw 

A Manhattan Knight 

Molly and I 

Black Shadows 

The Tattlers 

The Mother of His Children 

Leave it to Me 

Would You Forgive 

The Dead Line 

Love's Harvest 

Forbidden Trails 

The Spirit of Good 

Ihe Iron Heart 

White Lies 

W W ' m ° f r buffering Creek 

World of Folly 

A Sister to Salome 

Number 17 

The Square Shooter 

The Little Wanderer 

The Rose of Nome 

Ihe Man Who Dared 

Fire Brand Trevison 

Her Honor the Mayor 

GOLDWYN PICTURES CORP. 

The Girl from Outside 

Lord and Lady Algy . ,.j 

The World and Its Woman..." 

Almost a Husband 

Strictly Confidential , 

Bonds of Love 

Jinx 

The Cup of Fury 

The Gay Lord Quex ....V. 

Jubilo 

The Loves of Letty .!!!!!! 

Flame of the Desert ..!!!"" 

Toby's How 

The Street Called Straight;;.;;;;'" 

Pinto . 

Water, Water Everywhere; ' 



Released 



xi, t» i /- Released 

the 1'aliser Case a 

The Blooming Angel 

The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come.. 

The Woman in Room 13 — — 

Duds 

Partners of the Night u 

The Strange Boarder ! 

Dangerous Days ! 

The Silver Horde 

The Woman and the Puppet 

Out of the Storm 

Jes' Call Me Jim 

Dollars and Sense 

Double-Dyed Deceiver 

The Great Accident 

Scratch My Back 

The Slim Princess 

The Truth " 

Stop Thief .....! 

Cupid, the Cowpuncher 

Going Some [ 

HALLMARK PICTURES CORP. 
Famous Directors' Series 

A Dangerous Affair 

Wit Wins 

Love, Honor and ? 

The Phantom Honeymoon 

The Heart of a Gypsy 

A Woman's Experience 

High Speed 

Chains of Evidence 

Veiled Marriage 

Carmen of the North 

Specials 

The Other Man's Wife 

Wanted for Murder 

The Littlest Scout 

A House Divided 

Challenge of Chance 

False Gods 

The Discarded Woman 

Love of Money 

The Common Sin 

Plimpton Pictures 

Should a Wife Work? 

What Children Will Do 

W. W. HODKINSON CORP. 
Benj. B. Hampton — Great Authors Pictures, Inc. 

The Westerners 

The Sagelnusher 

Zane Grey Pictures, Inc. — Benj. B. Hampton and 

Eltinge F. Warner 

Desert Gold 

Riders of the Dawn 

J. Parker Read, Jr., Productions 

The Lone Wolf's Daughter 

Sex 

Love Madness ■ 

Deitrich-Beck, Inc. 

The Bandbox 

The Harvest Moon 

Dial Film Co. Productions 

King Spruce 

Artco Productions 

The Capitol 

Cynthia of the Minute 

Robert Brunton Productions 

Live Sparks 

$30,000 

The Dream Cheater 

No. 99 

The Green Flame 

Joseph Levering Productions 

His Temporary Wife 

Louis Tracy Productions, Inc. 
The Silent Barrier 

METRO PICTURES CORP. 

Lombardi, Ltd 11-19 

I'lease Get Married 11-19 

Fair and Warmer 12-19 

Should a Woman Tell? 12-19 

The Willow Tree 1-20 



371 



THIS SPACE IS TO TELL 

YOU HOW GOOD WE ARE! 

THERE IS NOT ROOM. 

Please ask any first'class 
director or cameraman 



WE WANT YOUR 
RELEASE PRINTS 

CAPACITY 35 0,0 00 WEEKLY 

GET A QUOTATION 



Released 

Stronger Than Death 1-20 

Nothing But the Truth 1-20 

The Right of Way 2-20 

The Walk Offs 2-20 

Shore Acres 3-20 

Old Lady 31 3-20 

A Modern Salome 3-20 

The Very Idea 3-20 

Alias Jimmy Valentine 4-20 

Dangerous to Men 4-20 

Burning Daylight 4-20 

Heart of a Child 4 20 

Nothing But Lies 4-20 

The Best of Luck 5-31-20 

The Cheater ■ 6-7 20 

Parlor, Bedroom and Bath 7-5-20 

The Misfit Wife 7-19-20 

Mutiny of the Elsinore 8-20 

Held in Trust 8-2-20 

The Chorus Girl's Romance 8-16-20 

PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 

Baby Marie's Round-Up 9-7-19 

The Virtuous Model 9-14-19 

The False Code 9-21-19 

The Twin Pawns 9-28-19 

Impossible Catherine 10-5-19 

A Damsel in Distress 10-12-19 

The Moonshine Trail 10-19-19 

The Gay Old Dog 11-2-19 

A Woman of Pleasure 11-9-19 

The Right to Lie 11-16-19 

Miss Gingersnap 11-23-19 

Dawn 11-30-19 

Brothers Divided 12-7-i9 

The A. B. C. of Love 12-14-19 

The Prince and Betty 12-21-19 

My Husband's Other Wife 1-4-20 

Fighting Cressy 1-11-20 

The Web of Deceit 1-18-20 

Other Men's Shoes 2-1-20 

Respectable by Proxy 2-1-20 

Smoldering Embers 2-29-20 

In Walked Mary 3-7-20 

Tarnished Reputations 3-14-20 

The Deadlier Sex 3-28-20 

Lifting Shadows 4-4-20 

The Blood Barrier 4-11-20 

Rio Grande ; 4-25-20 

Dollar for Dollar 5-2-20 

The Miracle of Money 5-9-20 

Simple Souls 5-23-20 

Sherry 5-30-20 

The Little Cafe 6-6-20 

Passers By 6-20-20 

The Broadway Cowboy . . .' 7-4-20 

Man and His Woman 7-18-20 

One Hour Before Dawn 8-1-20 

The Girl in the Web 8-15-20 

Lahoma ° 8-29-20 

Also American Film Co. Productions 

PIONEER FILM CORP. 

Thoughtless Women 

What Women Want 

Hidden Code 

Place of Honeymoons • 

Where Is My Husband? 

Midnight Gambols 

Bubbles 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 

Sins of the Children 

Atonement 

Girl from Nowhere 

Long Arm of Mannister 

The Boomerang 

Virtuous Sinners 

Redemption 

Today 

Carmen of the Klondike 

Still Alarm 

Wives of Men 

Suspicion 

Cold Deck 

Who Shall Take My Life? 

The Garden of Allah 

Accidental Honeymoon 

Struggle Everlasting 

Civilization 

Sunny Series — — 

Sleep of Cyma Roget 



REALART PICTURES CORP. 



Released 



Soldiers of Fortune 

The Mystery of the Yellow Room. 

The Luck of the Irish 

The Deep Purple 

The Law of the Yukon 

Anne of Green Gables 

Erstwhile Susan 

The Fear Market 

ludy of Rogue's Harbor 

The Stolen Kiss 

Sinners 

Nurse Marjorie 

Jenny Be Good 

Miss Hobbs 

A Cumberland Romance 

A Dark Lantern 



ROBERTSON-COLE CO. 

Dangerous Waters 

For a Woman's Honor 

House of Intrigue 

The Dragon Painter 

Kitty Kelly, M.D 

Open Door 

Poor Relations 

The Grev Wolf's Ghost 

The Broken Butterfly 

The Illustrious Prince 

The Blue Bandana 

A Fugitive from Matrimony 

Heart of Juanita 

The Tong Man 

Beckoning Roads 

The Beloved Cheater 

Haunting Shadows 

The Third Generation 

The Beggar Prince 

The Luck of Geraldine Laird 

Seeing It Through 

Who's Your Servant 

The Flame of Hellgate 

The Third Woman 

A Woman Who Understood 

The Brand of Lopez 

The White Dove 

Bright Skies 

The Bottom of the World 

The Butterfly Man 

The Devil's Claim 

The Notorious Mrs. Sands 

The Fortune Teller 

The Wonder Man 

Unchartered Channels 

Heart of Twenty 

Li Ting Lang 

Moon Madness 

Life's Twist 

An Arabian Knight 

SELZNICK ENTERPRISES 
Select Pictures 

Faith of the Strong 

A Scream in the Night 

Isle of Conquest 

The Undercurrent 

The Last of His People 

She Loves and Lies 

The Servant Question 

Seeds of Vengeance 

Selznick Pictures 

A Regular Girl 

The Country Cousin 

Sealed Hearts 

The Glorious Lady 

Picadilly Jim 

Out Yonder 

The Broken Melody 

The Woman God Sent 

Footlights and Shadows 

The Imp 

Sooner or Later 

His Wife's Money 

Greater Than Fame 

Youthful Folly 

His Word of Honor 

A Fool and His Money 

The Shadow of Rosalie Byrnes 

Out of the Snows 

The Man Who Lost Himself 

The Flapper 

Whispers 



9-7 
9-14 
9-21 

9- 28 

10- 5 
10-12 
10-19 

10- 26 

11- 2 
11-9 

11- 16 
11-23 
11-30 
11-14 
11-21 
11-28 

1-11 
1-18 

1- 25 
2-1 

2- 8 

2- 22 

2- 29 

3- 7-20 

3- 14-20 
3-21-20 

3- 28-20 

4- 4-20 

4- 11-20 

4- 18-20 

5- 2-20 

5- 9-20 

5- 16-20 

5- 30-20 

6- 6-20 

6- 20-20 

7- 4-20 

7- 18-20 

8- 1-20 

8- 15-20 



-19 
-19 
-19 
-19 
-19 

19 
-19 
-19 
-19 
-19 
-19 
-19 
-19 
-19 

19 
-19 
-20 
-20 
-20 
-20 
-20 
-20 
-20 



5-3-20 
5-10-20 
5-17-20 



373 



BRINGING OIDWORLD 
MARKETS TO NEW 
WORLD MERCHANTS 



via INTER -OCEAN 



rj'IVE years ago, the foreign 
film market, its scope and 
possibilities, were unknown to 
the American Producer. Today 
it represents a vital adjunct to 
his business. 

Inter-Ocean Film Corporation, 
acting as the medium through 
which foreign buyers were 
enabled to obtain exclusive ter- 



ritorial rights to American pro- 
ductions, has played a most 
important part in the develop- 
ment of this branch of the 
business. 

During its brief career as an 
export house, Inter-Ocean Film 
Corporation has taken over the 
problems of export distribution 
and brought the old world mar- 
ket to new world merchants. 



For further particulars, write or cable to 



INTERrQCEAN FILrfvy 

PAUL H.CROMEUN 

PRCS. Ot QEN'L.MQR, 

374 



Released 

The Valley of Doubt 5 ; 2 i'?£ 

The Desperate Hero 0 -2- 20 

The Figurehead 2" 52 

Stop That Man „"' 5 " 2 2 

The Point of View 7-12-20 

The Woman Game 

National Pictures 

Blind Youth 

Just a Wife — — . 

The Invisible Divorce 

Who Am 1? 

Marooned Hearts 

Out of the Snows 

Republic Pictures 

Trilby (re-issue) 

Girl of the Sea 

The Amazing Woman 

The Blue Pearl 

Twelve Ten 

Dad's Girl 

The Gift Supreme 

The One Way Trail 

Mothers of Men 

The Great Shadow 

The Adventuress 

Man's Plaything — 

Children Not Wanted 

The Girl Who Dared 

Romany, Where Love Runs Wild 

When Bearcat Went Dry 

UNITED ARTISTS CORP. 

His Majesty, the American 9-1-19 

Broken Blossoms 10-20-19 

When the Clouds Roll By 12-29-19 

Down On the Farm 4-25-20 

Pollyanna 1-18-20 

Romance 5-23-20 

The Mollycoddle 6-13-20 

Suds 6-27-20 

UNITED PICTURE THEATERS 

Playthings of Passion 

The Woman Under Oath 

A Man's Fight 

Her Game 

The Eternal Mother 

The Corsican Brothers 

UNIVERSAL 

The Woman Under Cover ■ 

The Sundown Trail 

Common Property 

Loot 

Bonnie, Bonnie Lassie ■ 

The Brute Breaker 

The Rider of the Law 

The Trembling Hour 

His Divorced Wife 

Under Suspicion 

Lasca 

A Gun Fighting Gentleman 

The Pointing Finger 

The Day She Paid 

The Triflers 

The Phantom Melody 

Marked Men 

Rouge and Riches \ 

The Prince of Avenue A 

The Peddler of Lies 

Blind Husbands . . 

The Devil's Pass Key 

The Forged Bride 

The Girl in Number 29 

Her Five Foot Highness . - 

Locked Lips 

Bullet Proof 

The Path She Chose 

Everything But the Truth 

A Tokio Siren 

Alias Miss Dodd 

Human Stuff 

The Red Lane ....!!'.!"!!!" 

The Girl in the Rain 

La La Lucille . 

Adorable Savage 

Under Northern Lights....! 

Blue Streak McCoy ; 

In Folly's Trail 

Jewel Productions 

rorbidden 

Paid in Advance 



Released 



The Right to Lie ^ZZZ 

Blind Husbands 

The Devil's Pass Key 

Under Crimson Skies 

VITAGRAPH 

A Master Stroke 

Bab's Candidate 

Clover's Rebellion 

Deadline at Eleven — — 

Human Collateral 

In Honor's Web 

Pegeen 

The Birth of a Soul 

The Black Gate ' 

The Combat 

The Darkest Hour ■ — • 

The Fighting Colleen 

The Flaming Clue 

The Garter Girl 

The Gauntlet — — - 

The Golden Shower 

The Gray Towers Mystery ■ 

The Juggernaut - 

The Midnight Bride 

The More Excellent Way 

The Prey 

The Purple Cipher 

The Sea Rider 

The Sins of the Mothers 

The Tower of Jewels , 

The Whisper Market ■ 

The Winchester Woman — 

The Wreck ■ 

When a Man Loves 

Specials 

Captain Swift ■ — - 

Dollars and the Woman ■ 

Slaves of Pride 

The Climbers ' 

The Courage of Marge O'Doone 

The Fortune Hunter 

The Sporting Duchess 

The Vengeance of Durand 

The Winchester Woman 

The Wolf ■ 

Trumpet Island — 

WORLD PICTURES 
(Republic Release) 

Dad's Girl 11-24-19 

Forest Rivals 9- IS- 19 

His Father's Wife 9-8-19 

Me and Captain Kidd 11-3-19 

Miss Crusoe 9-29-19 

The Arizona Catclaw 10-27-19 

The Battler 9-1-19 

The .Black Circle 10-20-19 

The Oakdale Affair 10-6-19 

The Poison Pen 11-10-19 

When Bearcat Went Dry Special 

Where Bonds Are Loosed 9-22-19 

Woman of Lies 10-13-19 

You Never Know Your Luck 11-17-19 

STATE RIGHTS FEATURES 

All Man W. H. Prod. 

Amazing Lovers A. H. Fisher 

Ashes of Desire Jacob Wilk 

Before the White Man Came Arrow 

Blind Love Bacon 

Blindness of Youth Gersten 

Broken Hearts Radin 

Bromley Case Empire State 

Chamber Mystery Arrow 

Child for Sale Graphic 

Circumstantial Evidence Arrow 

Common Level Transatlantic 

Confession, The National 

Crimson Shoals Monopol 

Dancer's Peril Wilk & Wilk 

Darkest Russia Wilk & Wilk 

Democracy Democracy Photoplav 

Desert Scorpion Empire State 

Daughter of the Don Arrow 

Divorce Game Wilk & Wilk 

Empty Arms Photoplay Library 

Everybody's Business W. H. Prod. 

Face in the Moonlight Wilk & Wilk 

Face to Face Grossman 

Fall of a Saint Graphic 

False Friends Wilk & Wilk 

Fighting Kentuckians Sterling 



375 



"BIG" JACK O'BRIEN 



Dramatic Leads 





"BRIDE 13" Fox Ser- 
ial. 

■* 

"WINGS OF PRIDE" 

B. A. Rolfe Special. 

"THE i STEALERS' ' 

W. ChristyJ Cab anne 
Special. 

"The BETTER WAY" 
with Hope Hampton. 

"BAB'S DIARY" 
with Marguerite Clark. 



376 



Fools' Gold Merit 

Friday the Uth Wilk & Wilk 

Frivolous Wives Fidelity 

Gilded Cage Wilk & Wilk 

Girl's Folly Wilk & Wilk 

Heart of Texas Merit 

Hell Hound of Alaska W. H. Prod. 

His Pajama Girl C. B. Price 

House Without Children Film Market 

Human Driftwood Wilk & Wilk 

Human Passions Wilk & Wilk 

Hungry Heart Wilk & Wilk 

Husbands and Wives Gaumont 

Inner Voice American Cinema 

Isle of Destiny Character Pictures 

It Happened in Paris Tyrad 

La Boheme Wilk & Wilk 

Land of Long Shadows Kremer 

Little Shepherd of Bargain Row Kremer 

Little Shoes Kremer 

Lone Hand Alexander 

Lost Battalion W. H. Prod. 

Love's Flame Fidelity 

Love's Protege Arrow 

Love Wins H. & H. Prod. 

Love Without Question Jans 

Madonnas and Men Jans 

Man of the Hour Wilk & Wilk 

Man There Was Radiosoul 

Man Who Forgot Wilk & Wilk 

Married Virgin Fidelity 

Miss Petticoats Wilk & Wilk 

Moral Suicide Graphic 

Mystery of Washington Square Fide!ity 

Neglected Wives Wistaria 

Nobody's Girl National 

Once to Every Man Merit 

Open Places KremT 

Open Your Eyes Warner 

Out of the Dust McCarthy 



as? w£ a ! ns 

Price Woman Pays • — 

t^'VTa^ 

Sacred Flame w H p ^ 

Satan's Pawn willT* Wilk 

Self-Made Widow Wilk, S WiK 

She Played and Pa.d Joan Fte. 

She Wolf Lesser 

!ome E Wild Oat. \ ! .' •' .'SamV Cummins 

Someone Must Pay wfit* Wilk 

Spurs of Sybil w H Prod 

Staking His L.fe • ^ |rod. 

Starvation wjii x, Wilk 

Stolen Voice W W Prod 

Straight Road W - I; * r ° t 1: 

Stream of Life r' Reprice 

Submarine U-3S wTn> *■ Wilk 

Sudden Riches W.Ik & M 

Superman ■ • • • **■ A ' j-L 

Through the Eyes of Men Radin 

Trail of the Cigarette Arrow 

Trip to Mars • • ■ J owe ' 

Unknown Ranger Aywon 

Unseen Witness £"a°Z 

Up in Mary's Attic 

Vigilanties Arrow 

Wall Street Mystery Arrow 

What Women Love L.esser 

Who's Your Brother Cur tiss 

Window Opposite Vw£l 

Witches Gold Capitol 

Wolves of the Street •■ Arrow 

Woman Alone • .Wilk & Wilk 

Woman He Chose Mickey Film Corp. 

Woman's Business ..Jans 

Woman's Love Arrow 

Woman's Man ■ . .Arrow 

Women Men Forget American Cinema 



Directors and Their Productions 

Herewith will be found a complete list of the productions from Sept. 1 , 1919 to Aug. 81, 
1920, classified and alphabetically arranged according to the name of the director. 



Ivan Abramson 

Child for Sale 

Someone Must Pay 
John G. Adolfi 

The Wonder Man 

Who's Your Brother 
Oscar Apfel 

Me and Captain Kidd 

The Oakdale Affair 

The Steel King 
George Archainbaud 

A Damsel in Distress 

In Walked Mary 

The Shadow of Rosalie Byrne 

What Women Want 
Edwin August 

The Poisen Pen 
Clarence G. Badger 

Almost A Husband 

Jes' Call Me Jim 

Jubilo 

The Strange Boarder 

Water, Water, Everywhere 

Strictly Confidential 

Cupid, the Cowpuncher 
Oliver D. Bailey 

Blind Love 
George D. Baker 

The Cinema Mmrder 

The Man Who Lost Hiauelf 
Hugo Ballin 

Trimmed in Red 
Fred Balshofer 

The Adventuress 
Reginald Barker 

Bonds of Love 

The Woman and the Puppet 

The Flame of the Desert 

Dangerous Days 



J. M. Barry 

Passion's Playground 

The Turning Point 
Frank Beal 

The Devil's Riddle 

Broken Commandments 

Thieves 

Tin Pan Alley 

A World of Folly 
Harry Beaumont 

Dollars and Sense 

Toby's Bow 

The Gay Lord Quex 

The Great Accident 

Going Some 

Stop Thief 
William Bertram 

Baby Marie's Round-Up 

Miss Gingersnap 
Chester Bennett 

When a Man Loves 
George Beranger 

A Manhattan Knight 
Raymond Tristan Bernard 

The Little Cafe 
Herbert Blache 

The Walk-Offs 

Stronger Than Death 

The Hope 
Mma. Alice Blache 

Tarnished Reputations 
J. Stuart Blackton 

The Blood Barrier 

The Moonshine Trail 

Dawn 

My Husband's Other Wife 
Respectable By Proxy 
Passers-By 

Man and His Woman 



Frank Borzage 

Humoresque 
Charles Brabin 

I. a Belle Russe 

Kathleen Mavourneen 

While New York Sleeps 
Bertram Bracken 

The Long Arm of Mannister 

The Confession 

Parted Curtains 
Robert North Bradbury 

The Faith of the Strong 

The Last of his People 
Herbert Brenon 

Twelve-Ten 
Clarence Brown 

The Great Redeemer 
Tod Browning 

The Virgin of Stamboul 

Bonnie, Bonnie, Lassie 
Kenean Buel 

The Fallen Idol 

The Veiled Marriage 
Fred J. Butler 

Fickle Women 
W. Christy Cabanne 

The Triflers 

Bu